• RandomGuy (unregistered)

    Fristh!

  • faoileag (unregistered)

    I like the fact that the frist offered language is "Step 5" - never heard of that, does anybody know where it's spoekn?

  • faoileag (unregistered) in reply to RandomGuy
    RandomGuy:
    Fristh!
    Probably the shortest pun possible with todays wtf. Congratulations, didn't think of that one!
  • Yuval (unregistered)

    You should probably know that grammar correction is nowhere on the scale of anything that you guys ever show here. It's an unbelievably difficult open problem which no algorithm gets even 90% right. In this case it's obvious what happened - Word parsed "need" as a noun rather than a verb, and attempted to fix the supposed-determiner (when in fact "these" serves as a noun). Not great, but completely within today's NLP algorithms' standard.

  • 3th (unregistered)

    It's not threeth, it's thith.

  • QJo (unregistered)

    Engish is wo' is spokeng weng you ging koo ge gengkisk ang your ngoukh is ngung.

  • QJo (unregistered) in reply to QJo
    QJo:
    Engish is wo' is spokeng weng you ging koo ge gengkisk ang your ngoukh is ngung.

    Sorry, gack shoug say: "wo' is skokeng ..."

  • JimM (cs) in reply to faoileag
    faoileag:
    RandomGuy:
    Fristh!
    Probably the shortest pun possible with todays wtf. Congratulations, didn't think of that one!

    I make "oneth" one character less, and also better in keeping with the language of the wtf! :p </pedant>

  • ThePants999 (cs)

    I accidentally the whole {0} :-(

  • tin (cs) in reply to faoileag
    faoileag:
    I like the fact that the frist offered language is "Step 5" - never heard of that, does anybody know where it's spoekn?

    I initially thought the same and was going to make a similar comment - but if you count the dropdown boxes, it's the 5th box they want you to fill in. Poor design, but I suspect the "Search For" box has "Step 1" in it, and so on.

  • Pfffft (unregistered)

    Wouldn't it be pronounced Thrith?

  • Kevin DeVoe (unregistered)

    I didn't submit that O.o

    Captcha: amet, and apparently I've typed amet in a textbox before because it auto-filled.

  • kilroo (cs) in reply to ThePants999
    ThePants999:
    I accidentally the whole {0} :-(
    Could you turn down that halo? It's blinding me.
  • QJo (unregistered)

    This is not a test TDWTF forum.

    Please create a new comment in the Sandbox environment.

  • McKay (unregistered)

    It looks like everything is up to date. No need to refresh any content ;)

  • anonymous (unregistered)

    MS Word probably doesn't recognise that "redlines" is the object of that sentence (and plural).

    If the object was "PDF", the sentence would correctly read "This needs to match the PDF..."

  • ContraCorners (cs) in reply to JimM
    JimM:
    faoileag:
    RandomGuy:
    Fristh!
    Probably the shortest pun possible with todays wtf. Congratulations, didn't think of that one!

    I make "oneth" one character less, and also better in keeping with the language of the wtf! :p </pedant>

    1rd

  • Beve Stallmer (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Penguin (unregistered) in reply to Beve Stallmer
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Qazwsx (unregistered)

    Do they speak Engish in Step 5?

  • zerothst (unregistered) in reply to anonymous
    anonymous:
    MS Word probably doesn't recognise that "redlines" is the object of that sentence (and plural).

    If the object was "PDF", the sentence would correctly read "This needs to match the PDF..."

    It thinks "need" is the subject instead of "This". Which is why the options were trying to make it a noun:

    This need ---or--- These needs

  • Valued Service (unregistered) in reply to zerothst
    zerothst:
    anonymous:
    MS Word probably doesn't recognise that "redlines" is the object of that sentence (and plural).

    If the object was "PDF", the sentence would correctly read "This needs to match the PDF..."

    It thinks "need" is the subject instead of "This". Which is why the options were trying to make it a noun:

    This need ---or--- These needs

    Yeah, and imagine what algorithms tries when you're logically missing a word. (algorithms <it> tries) That missing word changes the subject of the sentence.

  • RichP (cs) in reply to faoileag
    faoileag:
    RandomGuy:
    Fristh!
    Probably the shortest pun possible with todays wtf. Congratulations, didn't think of that one!
    {0}th
  • anonymous (unregistered) in reply to zerothst
    zerothst:
    anonymous:
    MS Word probably doesn't recognise that "redlines" is the object of that sentence (and plural).

    If the object was "PDF", the sentence would correctly read "This needs to match the PDF..."

    It thinks "need" is the subject instead of "This". Which is why the options were trying to make it a noun:

    This need ---or--- These needs

    That would make the sentence into a fragment. Who knows. Maybe it does... I still like my theory better though.
  • Simatic S5 (unregistered) in reply to faoileag
    faoileag:
    I like the fact that the frist offered language is "Step 5" - never heard of that, does anybody know where it's spoekn?

    It's spoekn in the world of Siemens. They upgraded to Step 7 though.

  • Hydragyrum (unregistered)

    IIRC

    Oneth and twoth are perfectly valid old english forms of first and second.

    Is threeth incorrect?

  • mi (unregistered) in reply to Yuval
    Yuval:
    You should probably know that grammar correction is nowhere on the scale of anything that you guys ever show here. It's an unbelievably difficult open problem which no algorithm gets even 90% right. In this case it's obvious what happened - Word parsed "need" as a noun rather than a verb, and attempted to fix the supposed-determiner (when in fact "these" serves as a noun). Not great, but completely within today's NLP algorithms' standard.
    Honestly, I don't get why they still bother; "grammar correction" has been ridiculously broken in each and every release of Office.

    I know that it's not necessarily due to incompetence on their part and comes from the fact that NLP is an extremely complex problem, but since current algorithms aren't yet up to the task, just remove this misfeature and stop wasting time with it.

  • GoatRider (cs) in reply to anonymous
    anonymous:
    That would make the sentence into a fragment. Who knows. Maybe it does... I still like my theory better though.

    Sentence fragment. Good device. Use more.

  • JimM (cs) in reply to ContraCorners
    ContraCorners:
    1rd

    I can't even start to work out how you'd pronounce that... Oo

  • ContraCorners (cs) in reply to JimM
    JimM:
    ContraCorners:
    1rd

    I can't even start to work out how you'd pronounce that... Oo

    One - erd. (or maybe like Van Gogh... One Eared)

  • anonymous (unregistered) in reply to JimM
    JimM:
    ContraCorners:
    1rd

    I can't even start to work out how you'd pronounce that... Oo

    You don't. It's unheard.

  • I had muscles once. (unregistered) in reply to Hydragyrum
    Hydragyrum:
    IIRC

    Oneth and twoth are perfectly valid old english forms of first and second.

    Is threeth incorrect?

    Oneth = once, said with a lisp Twoth = calcified structure embedded in the jaw of a vertebrate

  • da Doctah (cs) in reply to ContraCorners
    ContraCorners:
    1rd
    Once had to work with an automatic ordinal-number maker that used only the last digit of the number to set the suffix. Result: elevenst.

    (Why can't the Engish teach their chidren how to speak?)

  • chubertdev (cs)

    Held my breath for a second when I saw "Panasonic Toughbook." I've worked on one of their sites before, and it wouldn't surprise me to see it here.

  • QJo (unregistered) in reply to I had muscles once.
    I had muscles once.:
    Hydragyrum:
    IIRC

    Oneth and twoth are perfectly valid old english forms of first and second.

    Is threeth incorrect?

    Oneth = once, said with a lisp Twoth = calcified structure embedded in the jaw of a vertebrate

    Threeth: contemporary mild expletive, said with a lithp

  • AverageJon (unregistered)

    The real WTF is running for exercise. Playing in a sandbox is much more fun.

  • Calli Arcale (unregistered) in reply to Yuval
    Yuval:
    You should probably know that grammar correction is nowhere on the scale of anything that you guys ever show here. It's an unbelievably difficult open problem which no algorithm gets even 90% right. In this case it's obvious what happened - Word parsed "need" as a noun rather than a verb, and attempted to fix the supposed-determiner (when in fact "these" serves as a noun). Not great, but completely within today's NLP algorithms' standard.

    Yes, it's pretty typical performance for a grammar checker. Which means the Real WTF is expecting a grammar checker to do the work of proofreading your work for you.

  • Nagesh (unregistered)

    She showed me her {0} and asked me to do the needful.

  • KattMan (cs) in reply to Nagesh
    Nagesh:
    She showed me her {0} and asked me to do the needful.
    So was she needful and did you fully fill her need?
  • J (unregistered) in reply to anonymous
    anonymous:
    zerothst:
    anonymous:
    MS Word probably doesn't recognise that "redlines" is the object of that sentence (and plural).

    If the object was "PDF", the sentence would correctly read "This needs to match the PDF..."

    It thinks "need" is the subject instead of "This". Which is why the options were trying to make it a noun:

    This need ---or--- These needs

    That would make the sentence into a fragment.
    Not if "redlines" is the verb. In that sense, it could be rephrased as, "This need to match the PDF is redlining."
  • Pawprint (cs) in reply to GoatRider
    GoatRider:
    anonymous:
    That would make the sentence into a fragment. Who knows. Maybe it does... I still like my theory better though.

    Sentence fragment. Good device. Use more.

    The last one isn't a sentence fragment, by the way; it's an imperative.

  • Coyne (cs)

    Can someone help me refresh my {0} download content for my threeth English drivers? I needs to do that while I visits the sandbox at my DUMMY BANK.

  • Anomaly (unregistered) in reply to Coyne
    Coyne:
    Can someone help me refresh my {0} download content for my threeth Engish drivers? I needs to do that while I visits the sandbox at my DUMMY BANK.

    FTFY

    Also 1rd would be Onerd, and would sound like honored. But what would 2rd sound like?

  • quibus (unregistered) in reply to Anomaly
    Anomaly:
    Also 1rd would be Onerd, and would sound like honored. But what would 2rd sound like?
    Twoerd, pronounced like "Turd".
  • chubertdev (cs) in reply to quibus
    quibus:
    Anomaly:
    Also 1rd would be Onerd, and would sound like honored. But what would 2rd sound like?
    Twoerd, pronounced like "Turd".

    Tuth?

  • Miguel (unregistered) in reply to anonymous
    anonymous:
    zerothst:
    anonymous:
    MS Word probably doesn't recognise that "redlines" is the object of that sentence (and plural).

    If the object was "PDF", the sentence would correctly read "This needs to match the PDF..."

    It thinks "need" is the subject instead of "This". Which is why the options were trying to make it a noun:

    This need ---or--- These needs

    That would make the sentence into a fragment. Who knows. Maybe it does... I still like my theory better though.

    "These" is a terrible subject for a sentence, and is inviting an unclear antecedent issue. Word may have been suggesting that "need" was the subject because it knew better than to use an unclear pronoun without a clarifying subject.

  • anotherusername (cs) in reply to Miguel
    Miguel:
    anonymous:
    zerothst:
    anonymous:
    MS Word probably doesn't recognise that "redlines" is the object of that sentence (and plural).

    If the object was "PDF", the sentence would correctly read "This needs to match the PDF..."

    It thinks "need" is the subject instead of "This". Which is why the options were trying to make it a noun:

    This need ---or--- These needs

    That would make the sentence into a fragment. Who knows. Maybe it does... I still like my theory better though.

    "These" is a terrible subject for a sentence, and is inviting an unclear antecedent issue. Word may have been suggesting that "need" was the subject because it knew better than to use an unclear pronoun without a clarifying subject.

    "These" is a perfectly fine subject for a sentence if the antecedent is clear from the preceding sentences.

    "Need to match the PDF", on the other hand, is a horribly unwieldy subject clause. If you intend to say that the need redlines, either describe the need in the preceding sentence (it's a need to match the PDF) and then say "This need redlines", or at least put it in a parenthetical by saying "this need (to match the PDF) redlines" so that it's obvious what the subject and object are.

  • J (unregistered) in reply to anotherusername
    anotherusername:
    "Need to match the PDF", on the other hand, is a horribly unwieldy subject clause. If you intend to say that the need redlines, either describe the need in the preceding sentence (it's a need to match the PDF) and then say "This need redlines", or at least put it in a parenthetical by saying "this need (to match the PDF) redlines" so that it's obvious what the subject and object are.
    I believe the OP's intention was for the object to be "the PDF redlines." I think it is more clear if reversed: "The PDF redlines need to match these."
  • Friedrice The Great (unregistered) in reply to Yuval
    Yuval:
    You should probably know that grammar correction is nowhere on the scale of anything that you guys ever show here. It's an unbelievably difficult open problem which no algorithm gets even 90% right. In this case it's obvious what happened - Word parsed "need" as a noun rather than a verb, and attempted to fix the supposed-determiner (when in fact "these" serves as a noun). Not great, but completely within today's NLP algorithms' standard.
    When I was teaching English in college, I worked on the committee that checked into using grammar checkers to teach grammar to English-as-a-second-language students. We concluded that students already needed to know English grammar in order to learn grammar from a grammar checker.
  • chubertdev (cs) in reply to Friedrice The Great
    Friedrice The Great:
    Yuval:
    You should probably know that grammar correction is nowhere on the scale of anything that you guys ever show here. It's an unbelievably difficult open problem which no algorithm gets even 90% right. In this case it's obvious what happened - Word parsed "need" as a noun rather than a verb, and attempted to fix the supposed-determiner (when in fact "these" serves as a noun). Not great, but completely within today's NLP algorithms' standard.
    When I was teaching English in college, I worked on the committee that checked into using grammar checkers to teach grammar to English-as-a-second-language students. We concluded that students already needed to know English grammar in order to learn grammar from a grammar checker.

    Did you put grammar in their grammar so they could grammar while they grammar?

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