• Robert (unregistered) in reply to jtwine

    Java developers never cease to amaze me... :P

    This is a very insightful comment.

    Java, a language developed by a convicted pedophile (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Naughton ) encourages the worst possible practices.

    And kids who were weaned on this toy language tend to have NO IDEA how a computer works.

    We NEVER hire anything but people with real Engineering degrees (Electrical, Mechanical, Civil) or mathematics degrees to do any of our work, including softwared development.

  • Asd (unregistered) in reply to Anonymous
    Anonymous:
    Asd:
    And no you do not need to use the return value of a method call. I can not think of a single language that requires that.

    Wirthian Pascal does that. Surprisingly, Borland compilers abolished this 'feature' rather quickly.

    Whatever anti-feature you can think of, there is always at least one language that uses it :)

  • Marcin (unregistered) in reply to Zylon
    Zylon:
    Bob:
    Sgt. Preston:
    What's degrading about sending or receiving code in attachments?

    What's malicious, contains code and usually comes in attachments?

    Executable code. Source code, however, is completely harmless, and it's generally a Really Good Idea to send code as an attachment since e-mail clients are notorious for screwing up formatting.

    So I hereby nominate "As an aside, please stop sending code in attachments. It's degrading to both of us." as the designated REAL WTF of this article.

    Seconded

  • (cs) in reply to Rootbeer
    Rootbeer:
    since one does not know what sort of funky things the recipient's mail client will do to the code if sent in the body of the email, such as reformatting or attempting to compile, it should be standard practice to send code as an attached TXT file.

    It would be a WTF indeed for a mail client to do anything to a plaintext message body except display it as plain text. Seriously: "attempting to compile"???

    If you were to make an argument that attachments are better because they help distinguish between the code sample and the submitter's own commentary thereupon, though, I'd agree with you...

    Actually mail readers that will accept HTML and displayed the rendered message as such could very well "compile and execute" code attached to them thinking that it needed to be done. Just think javascript for a minute. What if someone sent one in to an HTML enabled reader. Or better yet, just an HTML example of a WTF would totally mess this up.

    Send your example as an attachment and you are not at the mercy of the reader.

  • (cs) in reply to Robert
    Robert:
    Java developers never cease to amaze me... :P

    This is a very insightful comment.

    Java, a language developed by a convicted pedophile (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Naughton ) encourages the worst possible practices.

    And kids who were weaned on this toy language tend to have NO IDEA how a computer works.

    We NEVER hire anything but people with real Engineering degrees (Electrical, Mechanical, Civil) or mathematics degrees to do any of our work, including softwared development.

    Please tell us what field you are in, because a lot of us know that the degrees in CS are mostly useless and a few years actually doing the work is better off than a degree. Now of course if your field of work is in bridge building or even something smaller like building maintenance, I can see where engineering degrees would be of utmost importance.

    Of course if the colleges and universities actually taught useful skill sets in CS courses my statement wouldn't even need to be made.

  • Also Unenlightened (unregistered) in reply to RON

    To RON, re. C#, exceptions, etc, and I should have quoted but too late now...

    And what about me, who doesn't know what he is talking about or what the OP you refer to was talking about?

  • Maciej (unregistered) in reply to KattMan
    KattMan:
    Of course if the colleges and universities actually taught useful skill sets in CS courses my statement wouldn't even need to be made.

    Most college CS courses teach things that are useful to Computer Scientists. It would be great if there was an alternate line of study for Software Engineers.

  • (cs) in reply to Maciej
    Maciej:
    KattMan:
    Of course if the colleges and universities actually taught useful skill sets in CS courses my statement wouldn't even need to be made.

    Most college CS courses teach things that are useful to Computer Scientists. It would be great if there was an alternate line of study for Software Engineers.

    I stand corrected. Yes, I think that is a more accurate assessment.

  • (cs) in reply to Maciej
    Maciej:
    KattMan:
    Of course if the colleges and universities actually taught useful skill sets in CS courses my statement wouldn't even need to be made.

    Most college CS courses teach things that are useful to Computer Scientists. It would be great if there was an alternate line of study for Software Engineers.

    Amazingly, there are institutions that teach Software Engineering (and Hardware Engineering, etc.). When I was looking at colleges, I turned down a few schools who offered scholarships if I joined their various engineering programs--because I was looking to become a Mathematics teacher. I ended up changing to a Communication degree with a minor in math and nearly a minor in Computer Science. But, long story short, there are plenty of places that teach software engineering, if that's what you want to learn. I just couldn't stomach the though of three to five years of classes on the topic.

  • (cs) in reply to Bob
    Bob:
    Sgt. Preston:
    What's degrading about sending or receiving code in attachments?

    What's malicious, contains code and usually comes in attachments?

    Yes, and ...? Just how many recorded instances are there of viruses being fired when opened in a code editor? Superstition does nothing to enhance security.

  • (cs) in reply to vertagano
    vertagano:
    Maciej:
    KattMan:
    Of course if the colleges and universities actually taught useful skill sets in CS courses my statement wouldn't even need to be made.

    Most college CS courses teach things that are useful to Computer Scientists. It would be great if there was an alternate line of study for Software Engineers.

    Amazingly, there are institutions that teach Software Engineering (and Hardware Engineering, etc.). When I was looking at colleges, I turned down a few schools who offered scholarships if I joined their various engineering programs--because I was looking to become a Mathematics teacher. I ended up changing to a Communication degree with a minor in math and nearly a minor in Computer Science. But, long story short, there are plenty of places that teach software engineering, if that's what you want to learn. I just couldn't stomach the though of three to five years of classes on the topic.

    Not saying they don't teach the course, I am saying that what they teach is not useful to a real software engineer in the real world.

  • (cs) in reply to rjnewton
    rjnewton:
    Bob:
    Sgt. Preston:
    What's degrading about sending or receiving code in attachments?

    What's malicious, contains code and usually comes in attachments?

    Yes, and ...? Just how many recorded instances are there of viruses being fired when opened in a code editor? Superstition does nothing to enhance security.

    This may not be exactly what you mean but it comes real close: http://secunia.com/advisories/22603/ Essentially the Object Broker in Visual studio is compromised so a virus can get in via the IDE.

  • rdez (unregistered) in reply to Benanov

    ehh.. wha?

    You may want to read up on CIL, specifically the castclass isinst operations. ECMA 335 will help ya there.

    The 'as' operator uses isinst which incidentally pushes null onto the stack if the class cannot be casted. Casting uses.. castclass, which will throw an exception.

  • rdez (unregistered) in reply to Benanov
    Benanov:
    I think .NET does something like this when you ask for a stack trace--it'll throw an exception, catch it, and then give you the stack trace.

    The tell-tale "first exception thrown" slowdown is what gave it away to us.

    The .NET 'as' operator in C# works the same way. It'll try the cast and if it fails, you'll see the slowdown and get null.

    ehh.. wha?

    You may want to read up on CIL, specifically the castclass isinst operations. ECMA 335 will help ya there.

    The 'as' operator uses isinst which incidentally pushes null onto the stack if the class cannot be casted. Casting uses.. castclass, which will throw an exception.

  • (cs) in reply to KattMan
    KattMan:
    Not saying they don't teach the course, I am saying that what they teach is not useful to a real software engineer in the real world.
    And I wasn't responding to your observation. Rather, I was responding to Maciej, who said that it would be nice if there was a separate line of courses for Software Engineers. My point is that there are plenty of schools that separate Computer Science from Software Engineering, and some even make further distinctions.
  • Rich (unregistered) in reply to Zylon
    Zylon:
    Executable code. Source code, however, is completely harmless, and it's generally a Really Good Idea to send code as an attachment since e-mail clients are notorious for screwing up formatting.

    Well, duh. Obviously you print it out, take a photograph on a wooden table and send it as an inline-image.

    Rich

    The real WTF is that someone has undoubtedly posted this lame attempt at humor already in the time it has taken me to write this message

  • AktiveX (unregistered) in reply to Also Unenlightened

    A little experiment. C# code using the as operator. [STAThread] private static void Main(string[] args) { FileInfo bla = new FileInfo(@"c:"); object bla2 = bla; FileInfo bla3 = bla2 as FileInfo; }

    Here is the code above compiled into IL .method private hidebysig static void Main(string[] args) cil managed { .custom instance void [mscorlib]System.STAThreadAttribute::.ctor() .entrypoint .maxstack 2 .locals init ( [0] class [mscorlib]System.IO.FileInfo bla, [1] object bla2, [2] class [mscorlib]System.IO.FileInfo bla3, ) L_0000: nop L_0001: ldstr "c:\" L_0006: newobj instance void [mscorlib]System.IO.FileInfo::.ctor(string) L_000b: stloc.0 L_000c: ldloc.0 L_000d: stloc.1 L_000e: ldloc.1 L_000f: isinst [mscorlib]System.IO.FileInfo Here is the 'as' operator. It is a native opcode of il. notice no catch around it. L_0014: stloc.2 L_0015: br.s L_0017 L_0017: ret }

    Also the 'as' operator can not be used for checking value types. If this was using the same method as an explicit cast and just hiding the exception, then the as operator should work with value types. Also just for completness the explict cast '(...}' uses the IL 'castclass'.

    Hope this helps

    CAPTCHA : dreadlocks?

  • operagost (unregistered) in reply to Robert
    Robert:
    Java developers never cease to amaze me... :P

    This is a very insightful comment.

    Java, a language developed by a convicted pedophile (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Naughton ) encourages the worst possible practices.

    "Ad Hominem" much?
  • Anonymous L0sr (unregistered) in reply to NOR
    NOR:
    RON:
    Benanov:
    I think .NET does something like this when you ask for a stack trace--it'll throw an exception, catch it, and then give you the stack trace.

    The tell-tale "first exception thrown" slowdown is what gave it away to us.

    The .NET 'as' operator in C# works the same way. It'll try the cast and if it fails, you'll see the slowdown and get null.

    Wrong. Please stop talking if you have no clue what you're talking about.

    Please stop talking if you have no intention to enlight the unenlightened.

    No. This first step is to STFU if you don't know and use the interweb to find out. This kind of post only wastes time as people read it, think about it, research to verify it, and finally explain how/that it's wrong.

  • waffles (unregistered) in reply to Asd
    Asd:
    And no you do not need to use the return value of a method call. I can not think of a single language that requires that. Here is a tip: if you have to write "I'm not sure" when discussing basic language features then you probably should not reply at all.
    VB6 will generate a warning if you ignore the return value of a function (as compared to a sub). Rather nice feature actually, as it's pretty rare that you don't want to use a function's return value. If only a function/sub difference didn't have to be enforced by the language for it to be possible.
  • (cs) in reply to waffles
    waffles:
    Asd:
    And no you do not need to use the return value of a method call. I can not think of a single language that requires that. Here is a tip: if you have to write "I'm not sure" when discussing basic language features then you probably should not reply at all.
    VB6 will generate a warning if you ignore the return value of a function (as compared to a sub). Rather nice feature actually, as it's pretty rare that you don't want to use a function's return value. If only a function/sub difference didn't have to be enforced by the language for it to be possible.

    You can get rid of the warning if you simply drop the () and give the parameters list without them. for example:

    x = Myfunct(y, "j") Myfunc y, "j"

    are both valid and don't raise a warning.

    In addition a subroutine call requires you to leave off the (). if you want to add them you need to use the Call keyword. For example:

    Mysub y, "j" Call Mysub(y, "j") are both valid.

  • sjs (unregistered) in reply to Zylon
    Zylon:
    Executable code. Source code, however, is completely harmless, and it's generally a Really Good Idea to send code as an attachment since e-mail clients are notorious for screwing up formatting.

    So I hereby nominate "As an aside, please stop sending code in attachments. It's degrading to both of us." as the designated REAL WTF of this article.

    Fail.

    (What about interpreted stuff, like VB script?)

  • (cs) in reply to operagost
    operagost:
    Robert:
    Java developers never cease to amaze me... :P

    This is a very insightful comment.

    Java, a language developed by a convicted pedophile (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Naughton ) encourages the worst possible practices.

    "Ad Hominem" much?
    I think it is closer to poisoning the well.
  • (cs) in reply to sjs
    sjs:
    Zylon:
    Executable code. Source code, however, is completely harmless, and it's generally a Really Good Idea to send code as an attachment since e-mail clients are notorious for screwing up formatting.

    So I hereby nominate "As an aside, please stop sending code in attachments. It's degrading to both of us." as the designated REAL WTF of this article.

    Fail.

    (What about interpreted stuff, like VB script?)

    Well as long as you name it with a TXT extension rather then the VBS extension you are fine. Alex would be stupid to open a VBS file without checking it first anyway.

  • Maciej (unregistered) in reply to vertagano
    vertagano:
    ...

    But, long story short, there are plenty of places that teach software engineering, if that's what you want to learn. I just couldn't stomach the though of three to five years of classes on the topic.

    That's nice to hear.

  • Name (unregistered) in reply to Sgt. Preston
    Sgt. Preston:
    What's degrading about sending or receiving code in attachments?

    It's worse than failure.

  • (cs) in reply to KattMan
    KattMan:
    rjnewton:
    Bob:
    Sgt. Preston:
    What's degrading about sending or receiving code in attachments?

    What's malicious, contains code and usually comes in attachments?

    Yes, and ...? Just how many recorded instances are there of viruses being fired when opened in a code editor? Superstition does nothing to enhance security.

    This may not be exactly what you mean but it comes real close: http://secunia.com/advisories/22603/ Essentially the Object Broker in Visual studio is compromised so a virus can get in via the IDE.

    My bad. When I was composing my reply, I debated with myself whether to specify [plain text] within the in a code editor phrase, and decided not to because it seemed too bloody obvious.

    As amends, I offer the following link: http://www.lancs.ac.uk/staff/steveb/cpaap/pfe/ built and last updated in 1998, this is, IMHO still the most useful tool for editing code in a Windows environment. It has some very useful features, such as a macro-creation facility and the option of space based tabbing [I choose three-space], auto-indent, automatic endline detection and options for saving with endlines of choice, as well as command-execution features, but it does not impose anything under the hood.

  • Steve (unregistered)

    Thanx to all who commented on my little note. Yes, I know that what I wrote was not a complete solution -- it was more of just an example of how sometimes things aren't always as obvious as the novice might like them to be.

    This is not to be taken as casting aspersions toward the Java language or novice programmers. It's just a big subject which requires a fair amount of study. With luck, you eventually come to a point where it all more or less snaps into place. Before that, it can be a bit of a struggle, producing its share of WTFs on the way, unfortunately.

    Thanks to those who posted helpful web links, as well. I'm happy to say that I've assimilated enough of the Java milieu that I can usually now frame a Google query which will give me an answer. But, please, remember, sometimes it's difficult to ask "How do I . . ." when you're not even sure what ". . ." is.

  • (cs) in reply to cconroy
    cconroy:
    Gyske:
    Steve:
    ... Yes, coding something like
    new Throwable().printStackTrace();
    is certainly nicely elegant, it isn't precisely intuitively obvious, is it?
    I agree 100%. Java just is not the most intuitive, compact or pragmatic language in the world. And after 2 years, I still regularly use Google(codesearch) when programming in Java.

    BTW searchstrings like: "How to <insert task here> in java" often work surprisingly well.

    Unless, of course, your task is "hook up a hose to a kitchen sink".

    approximately 47600 hits, including this:

    Kitchen & Housewares at MSN Shopping More handy sink adapter. Hook it up when you need it, put it away when you dont. ... kitchen, and saves you the hassle of leaving home for your cuppa java! ...

  • (cs) in reply to Steve
    Steve:
    Yes, coding something like
    new Throwable().printStackTrace();
    is certainly nicely elegant, it isn't precisely intuitively obvious, is it?
    And the award for Most Adverbs Used in a Sentence goes to... Steve!
  • (cs) in reply to Robert
    Robert:
    Java developers never cease to amaze me... :P

    This is a very insightful comment.

    Java, a language developed by a convicted pedophile (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Naughton ) encourages the worst possible practices.

    You're right! Clearly Naughton's perverse predilections influenced his software design! These two facts must be related! I think I heard that Charles Manson always used gotos. Windows ME was mostly written by Dennis Rader. Payback is actually based upon preliminary designs by Osama bin Laden.
    And kids who were weaned on this toy language tend to have NO IDEA how a computer works.
    Totally agree. I don't know how many times I've met Java developers who weren't even clear on whether their computer was powered by electricity or a hampster wheel. I mean, why can't everyone still be trained on a REAL language, like BASIC or Pascal? There are programming languages that helped you learn exactly how a computer fuctioned! Abstraction is a complete waste of processor cycles. We only get a few billion of them every second; we can't be wasting them on making life easier on the developer. No, the programmer should be interfacing directly with the hard drive to store data, it's the only way to get it done right.
    We NEVER hire anything but people with real Engineering degrees (Electrical, Mechanical, Civil) or mathematics degrees to do any of our work, including softwared development.
    I don't know how many times I've been developing software and realized that I can't go any further until I work out the moment arms for my code! Just last week I was putting together the finishing touches on a database design and I forget to take into account the Hazen-Williams equation. Boy how I wished I had a degree in real engineering!
  • (cs) in reply to joe.edwards
    joe.edwards@imaginuity.com:
    Steve:
    Yes, coding something like
    new Throwable().printStackTrace();
    is certainly nicely elegant, it isn't precisely intuitively obvious, is it?
    And the award for Most Adverbs Used in a Sentence goes to... Steve!
    I am completely and thoroughly disgusted that this extremely prestigious award was given so quickly and surreptitiously that I honestly had no time to humbly submit my rather inventive (and really quite fiendish) sentence!
  • (cs) in reply to bstorer
    bstorer:
    joe.edwards@imaginuity.com:
    Steve:
    Yes, coding something like
    new Throwable().printStackTrace();
    is certainly nicely elegant, it isn't precisely intuitively obvious, is it?
    And the award for Most Adverbs Used in a Sentence goes to... Steve!
    I am completely and thoroughly disgusted that this extremely prestigious award was given so quickly and surreptitiously that I honestly had no time to humbly submit my rather inventive (and really quite fiendish) sentence!

    Well as they postulate, defecation does occur. Alternatively, if you perchance emote in disagreement I would have to exasperate that you are ascending an unsanitary tributary without any means of locomotion.

  • rgz (unregistered) in reply to Zylon
    Zylon:
    So I hereby nominate "As an aside, please stop sending code in attachments. It's degrading to both of us." as the designated REAL WTF of this article.

    Word. --~~~

  • Andrew (unregistered) in reply to Welbog
    Welbog:
    JavaNoob:
    As a beginner in Java, I have to ask: how does this even compile?

    i.doubleValue() returns a double, but if you don't assign it to something, wouldn't this fail to compile? That is, wouldn't you have to write "double j = i.doubleValue" or something?

    It's not required to use return values in Java. I don't even think you'll get a compiler warning in this situation. At least I don't remember ever seeing such a warning.

    Java absolutely requires return values. The compiler complains when a method can reach its end without a return(). The method below will cause a compile-time error.

    int caller() { if (true) return(5); else System.err.println("No return value."); }

    Of course, Java will calculate expressions without assigning them to any variable, e.g. "i.doubleValue();". Java can't be sure that the method has no side effects; doubleValue() might change the object.

  • RON (unregistered) in reply to Andrew
    Andrew:
    Welbog:
    JavaNoob:
    As a beginner in Java, I have to ask: how does this even compile?

    i.doubleValue() returns a double, but if you don't assign it to something, wouldn't this fail to compile? That is, wouldn't you have to write "double j = i.doubleValue" or something?

    It's not required to use return values in Java. I don't even think you'll get a compiler warning in this situation. At least I don't remember ever seeing such a warning.

    Java absolutely requires return values. The compiler complains when a method can reach its end without a return(). The method below will cause a compile-time error.

    int caller() { if (true) return(5); else System.err.println("No return value."); }

    Of course, Java will calculate expressions without assigning them to any variable, e.g. "i.doubleValue();". Java can't be sure that the method has no side effects; doubleValue() might change the object.

    No, that's not what they meant. For example:

    int function DoSomething()
    {
        // does something
        return 42;
    }
    
    // later...
    void SomeFunc()
    {
        DoSomething();          // some compilers treat this as an error since you're not capturing the return value
        int i = DoSomething();  // They would instead require you to do this, even if you discard the return value.
    

    I can kind of see the reason for doing that. After all, why have a return value if you're not going to use it?

    But then real life intervenes, and you find real world cases where you might not care about the return value, and thus this instantly becomes an annoying anti-feature.

  • Lektu (unregistered) in reply to Asd
    Asd:
    [And no you do not need to use the return value of a method call. I can not think of a single language that requires that.

    Ada. And that's a feature, and a nice one.

  • rien (unregistered) in reply to Bearded Unix Guru
    Bearded Unix Guru:
    I nominate using mail clients dumb enough to reformat whitespace as the REALLY REAL WTF. Berkeley mail FTW!

    I nominate using HTML mails as the REALLY REAL WTF OF THE WHOLE WORLD. that's n00bish, please let the elite sends real email using telnet, and use your favorite pen and paper if you don't know how to do it.

  • Sgt. Preston (unregistered) in reply to Derrick Pallas
    Derrick Pallas:
    Sgt. Preston:
    That might make the practice inconvenient, but how is it "degrading"?

    For me: it degrades my triage and processing speeds.

    For you: your submission is being degraded to an F.

    My "submission" was a simple, honest question that hasn't really been answered. Is this slap at my question an example of your "good social skills"?

  • Lemming (unregistered)
    Steve:
    Yes, coding something like
    new Throwable().printStackTrace();
    is certainly nicely elegant, it isn't precisely intuitively obvious, is it?
    There's no need to create a new Throwable/Exception to do this.
    roe:
    Actually, this used to be the way to pull a stack trace in Java until 1.5 (where the Thread-object was equipped with similar functionality).. although the choice of exception is a bit unorthodox.
    And this functionality is already present since Java 1.0.

    From the Java 1.0 API:

    public static void dumpStack()
    Prints a stack trace of the current thread. Used only for debugging. See Also: printStackTrace in class Throwable.
    For newcomers it's maybe a bit strange this method can't be found on class System, but that's because each thread has his own stack.
  • Unenlightened as well (unregistered) in reply to Also Unenlightened
    Also Unenlightened:
    To RON, re. C#, exceptions, etc, and I should have quoted but too late now...

    And what about me, who doesn't know what he is talking about or what the OP you refer to was talking about?

    why consider that when it's easier to just insult someone?

  • Theo (unregistered) in reply to RON
    RON:
    I can kind of see the reason for doing that. After all, why have a return value if you're not going to use it?

    But then real life intervenes, and you find real world cases where you might not care about the return value, and thus this instantly becomes an annoying anti-feature.

    Yes indeed. A real life example that comes to mind is unit testing. If you want to test for an error case, you usually don't care about the return value of your method, you just want to check that an exception has been thrown as expected.

    e.g.

    public void testAnExceptionHasBeenThrown() { try { classUnderTest.myMethod(badParams); // here I don't care about what myMethod returns fail("Exception has not been thrown!!!); } catch (Exception expected) { // various check on the exception } }

    Captcha: cognac. Why not?

  • Jeff (unregistered) in reply to Robert
    Robert:
    Java developers never cease to amaze me... :P

    This is a very insightful comment.

    Java, a language developed by a convicted pedophile (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Naughton ) encourages the worst possible practices.

    And kids who were weaned on this toy language tend to have NO IDEA how a computer works.

    We NEVER hire anything but people with real Engineering degrees (Electrical, Mechanical, Civil) or mathematics degrees to do any of our work, including softwared development.

    So convicted pedophiles are incapable of otherwise great creations?

    Additionally, I look forward to never working for your company.

  • (cs) in reply to Bob
    Bob:
    Sgt. Preston:
    What's degrading about sending or receiving code in attachments?
    What's malicious, contains code and usually comes in attachments?
    Ummm!...Microsoft Vista.
  • (cs) in reply to RON
    RON:
    I can kind of see the reason for doing that. After all, why have a return value if you're not going to use it?

    But then real life intervenes, and you find real world cases where you might not care about the return value, and thus this instantly becomes an annoying anti-feature.

    One classic example of a function with an often useless return value is "printf" in C. It returns the total number of character printed.

  • (cs) in reply to KattMan
    KattMan:
    ... Of course if the colleges and universities actually taught useful skill sets in CS courses my statement wouldn't even need to be made.
    Skill sets? SKILL SETS? You sound like an HR drone or a headhunter.
  • Watson (unregistered) in reply to Grimoire
    Grimoire:
    operagost:
    Robert:
    Java developers never cease to amaze me... :P

    This is a very insightful comment.

    Java, a language developed by a convicted pedophile (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Naughton ) encourages the worst possible practices.

    "Ad Hominem" much?
    I think it is closer to poisoning the well.
    I think it's closer to parody.
  • Watson (unregistered) in reply to Benanov
    Benanov:
    I think .NET does something like this when you ask for a stack trace--it'll throw an exception, catch it, and then give you the stack trace.

    The tell-tale "first exception thrown" slowdown is what gave it away to us.

    The .NET 'as' operator in C# works the same way. It'll try the cast and if it fails, you'll see the slowdown and get null.

    I call troll on this one. Anyone who could compose this would be capable of thinking of (foo is thingy) ? (thingy)foo : (thingy)null;

  • (cs) in reply to Zylon
    Zylon:
    Executable code. Source code, however, is completely harmless

    You are obviously new here. We have had source code that can cause temporary blindness, nausea, even paralysis.

    Anyways, if the language is a scripting language, the source is executable.

  • Watson (unregistered) in reply to Sgt. Preston
    Sgt. Preston:
    Derrick Pallas:
    Sgt. Preston:
    That might make the practice inconvenient, but how is it "degrading"?

    For me: it degrades my triage and processing speeds.

    For you: your submission is being degraded to an F.

    My "submission" was a simple, honest question that hasn't really been answered. Is this slap at my question an example of your "good social skills"?

    Compensating for the shift in voice from passive to active:

    If you make a submission and your supplied code is included in an attachment then a) I'd have to deal with an added burden that offers no benefit; as a result b) I triage your submission down to priority F.

    Clearer?

Leave a comment on “Bringing LOGing Back”

Log In or post as a guest

Replying to comment #:

« Return to Article