• Jussi (unregistered)

    "Antii" is certainly misspelt if it is a Finnish name. Antti is correct (I'm Finnish so I know).

  • foo (unregistered) in reply to Some Lad
    Some Lad:
    Zecc:
    At least the illiterate riffraff doesn't get in.

    Illiterate riffraff huh?

    I think you meant "don't", not "doesn't".

    You illiterate riff-raff you.

    Wouldn't you say that one riffraff does not get in a place while many riffraffi do not get into a place? It has something to do with Latin plurals doesn't it?

  • Tac Eht Xilef (unregistered)

    This was SOP at a highly secure comms room in a highly secure building I used to work in.

    Of course, everybody who had a reason to go in there knew the real code was written on the wall underneath the piece of paper...

  • Elmo Allén (unregistered) in reply to Qvasi
    Qvasi:
    However I wonder how "ntt" should be pronounced..

    In Finnish, double stop consonants are pronounced by making a bit longer stop and giving more stress to them. And double stop consonants are really very common in Finnish names, e.g. Antti, Pertti, Mikko, Pekka, Jukka. There are no names I know of that would end with double i - it would sound very strange, not Finnish at all.

  • Hognoxious (unregistered) in reply to Bjorn
    Bjorn:
    I bet it's not really on the door.
    It is, but on the inside.
  • anonymous user (unregistered) in reply to digislave
    digislave:
    I've seen this before: password for a key coded door written on the door and it did its job quite well.

    The door was an exit to an "old folks" home (long term care / palliative). The door was sufficiently secure to keep any of them from escaping.

    Gotta be careful about those fires, though..... doh!

  • (cs) in reply to Zecc
    Zecc:
    At least the illiterate riffraff doesn't get in.

    Maybe if they put a math puzzle on the door the skinny software nerds would finally hit the irons.

  • Antti (unregistered) in reply to Hognoxious
    Hognoxious:
    Bjorn:
    I bet it's not really on the door.
    It is, but on the inside.

    Nope. It was on the outside of the door. As implied in the original post, the door is not accessible to the general public. The sign was vaguely amusing. What prompted the photo was the various edits over the next couple of weeks to try and fix it.

    My guess is the late additions are not approved and (hopefully) the original intent was to not deny anybody access to the gym until a new, truly secret PIN was circulated by more secure means. But as I was never a gym member I'm just guessing.

  • Symbiatch (unregistered) in reply to anonymous user
    anonymous user:
    digislave:
    I've seen this before: password for a key coded door written on the door and it did its job quite well.

    The door was an exit to an "old folks" home (long term care / palliative). The door was sufficiently secure to keep any of them from escaping.

    Gotta be careful about those fires, though..... doh!

    You know, in one place where security was important (research center) they had a nice solution for electronic doors and power outages. If the power went out, all doors were locked and nobody could open them. Including stairwell doors. So even if you got out of the lab, you couldn't get out of the building.

    Now start a nice fire there which causes the fuses to blow and...

    (They did change the functionality after there were lots of complaints about this)

  • Ron (unregistered)

    At my office, some labs have an electronic lock. The lab door has a window in it. You can clearly look into the room and read lock code on the white board disguised as a telephone number. This keeps that casual roamer from entering the labs.

  • Regulus (unregistered)

    I can still read the code! Who's idea was it to leave the sign up.

    "Stupidity should hurt"

  • Paolo G (unregistered) in reply to Josh Zerin
    Josh Zerin:
    Hey, they left off the last digit, so it's not like they gave out the WHOLE combination. I mean, there's still 10 possible codes....

    Maybe not. I've seen locks of this kind that have X, Y and Z buttons as well as the ten digits.

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