• snoofle (unregistered)

    lazy programmers - sigh

  • SomeCoder (unregistered)

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    I guess it's a bit of a WTF that they have all the digits after that, but technically, it should read 30 pounds per day, right?

    I could be wrong.

  • Thany (unregistered)

    So you see, don't let a programmer do the job of a GUI designer.

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to SomeCoder
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    No, they don't.

  • Joe (unregistered) in reply to SomeCoder
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    I guess it's a bit of a WTF that they have all the digits after that, but technically, it should read 30 pounds per day, right?

    I could be wrong.

    In all English speaking countries '.' is used.

  • SomeCoder (unregistered) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    No, they don't.

    All right then :)

  • vt_mruhlin (cs) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    No, they don't.

    Especially when you consider that there's also a .00 at the end. Translating that to 3.000,00 would really make no sense.

  • T $ (cs) in reply to SomeCoder
    SomeCoder:
    Anon:
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?
    No, they don't.
    All right then :)
    Germany is a notable country that does this (comma and period reversed by our standards).

    Link: http://www.linux.com/articles/53781

  • Dan (cs)

    It more than likely it it unchecked and they put the annual salary in the hourly rate box. You see loads of those on UK job sites.

  • Mikey Benny (unregistered)

    Ahhh ChangePoint (the first screen shot is of ChangePoint)... it sucks rocks. IE-only, completely proprietary, no integration with the desktop, not even Outlook or vCard contact export.

  • Look at me! I'm on the internets! (unregistered) in reply to Dan

    I see this type of error on real estate sites all the time.

    Monthly rent entered as a sale price, Downpayment as sale price, etc.

    It's really annoying in that all the cheap houses get pushed down about 50 spots (5 pages for my local site) because of these erroneous entries.

  • Jamie (unregistered) in reply to vt_mruhlin

    That's a comma in the first thing so it's £30,000.00 which is £30,000 and two zero's after a decimal place.

    Using a comma as a decimal point just looks so alien to me.

  • QAHatesYou (unregistered)

    As a point of order, "less" is grammatically incorrect in the validation message, too. It should be "fewer."

  • too_many_usernames (cs) in reply to Mikey Benny
    Mikey Benny:
    Ahhh ChangePoint (the first screen shot is of ChangePoint)... it sucks rocks. IE-only, completely proprietary, no integration with the desktop, not even Outlook or vCard contact export.
    ChangePoint cannot possibly be as bad as Whizible.

    Well, maybe it could be that bad, but I find that very difficult to imagine.

  • Freddy Bob (unregistered) in reply to Look at me! I'm on the internets!
    Look at me! I'm on the internets!:
    It's really annoying in that all the cheap houses get pushed down about 50 spots (5 pages for my local site) because of these erroneous entries.
    That's a good thing if you know about it and few other people do. Unless you don't want to know about cheap places with little competition for them, that is.
  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to QAHatesYou

    Point of odor, QAHatesYou smells.

  • Shadowman (unregistered) in reply to Anon

    Actually, once you get as far as the 6th of Twent-Quintember, the days are more than 50 hours long.

  • Arancaytar (cs) in reply to SomeCoder
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    No, that's us Germans. Also, three-digit separators aren't usually used after the decimal point/comma. When it says 30,000.00, it actually means thirty thousand.

    Hey, if that were a player position instead of a manager, that figure would actually make sense. :P

  • poochner (cs) in reply to QAHatesYou
    QAHatesYou:
    As a point of order, "less" is grammatically incorrect in the validation message, too. It should be "fewer."
    It's not a natural number; it's a real number. "Less" is correct. They could have put "less than 32.6 hours" and it would have been more obvious, I grant.
  • jakkle (unregistered) in reply to SomeCoder
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    I guess it's a bit of a WTF that they have all the digits after that, but technically, it should read 30 pounds per day, right?

    I could be wrong.

    you are wrong. hideously wrong. a comma denotes thousands or millions etc - used before a group of 3 digits eg: 3,000 15,000,500 1,234,567,890,098,765,432.00

    not everyone can be bothered to use it though

  • jakkle (unregistered)

    yes i came in late. please dont hate me

  • nightkhaos (unregistered) in reply to jakkle

    They should, makes figures, particularly fingures in excess of 1,000,000 easier to read. When you work in accounting you find that the thousand seperator is a godsend.

  • poochner (cs) in reply to nightkhaos

    That's one good thing about making perl readable--you can use a thousand separator in decimal literals, though it's an underscore. (1_234_567)

  • a/c (unregistered)

    Well, I guess we know how long the backlog is for submissions, 'cause the last time Cisco closed at 25.71 was February 27th.

  • Someone You Know (cs) in reply to a/c
    a/c:
    Well, I guess we know how long the backlog is for submissions, 'cause the last time Cisco closed at 25.71 was February 27th.

    Well, no, but we know when the submitter took the screenshot.

  • Matthew (unregistered) in reply to Shadowman
    Shadowman:
    Actually, once you get as far as the 6th of Twent-Quintember, the days are more than 50 hours long.
    That would probably be better written as twent-tritember, assuming we don't get any more narcissistic emperors.

    And don't knock the English date form, unless you think the time should be represented as HH:SS:MM.

  • Pap (cs)

    Right click on the images; Properties.

    Does anyone else find hope and inspiration in the fact that Alex still uses "thedailywtf.com" internally to link to images?

  • Grant D. Noir (unregistered) in reply to poochner
    poochner:
    That's one good thing about making perl readable--you can use a thousand separator in decimal literals, though it's an underscore. (1_234_567)

    A notation which is most likely stolen from Ada.

    CAPTCHA: ewww (as in perl).

  • whicker (unregistered) in reply to Grant D. Noir

    IEC61131-3 Structured Text is like that:

    2#1111_00_101_1111 for grouping related bits together,

    T#35d_22h_21m_25s_330ms for exact time delay specification,

    16#BAD_BEEF for hexadecimal, etc.

  • James Robert (unregistered)

    I like beans.

  • Pecos Bill (unregistered) in reply to vt_mruhlin
    vt_mruhlin:
    Especially when you consider that there's also a .00 at the end. Translating that to 3.000,00 would really make no sense.

    Actually, when you swap , and . to use that standard, it makes perfect sense. It still amounts to 30 thousand pounds (30.000,00) or as you wrote it above, three thousand (3.000,00). Changing standards takes some getting used to, of course. (Germany isn't the only country that swaps the meaning from ours based on my experience in the Mediterranean. Hindi, according to the Linux link, separates every two digits greater than the 100s.)

  • Fuji (unregistered) in reply to Pecos Bill
    Pecos Bill:
    vt_mruhlin:
    Especially when you consider that there's also a .00 at the end. Translating that to 3.000,00 would really make no sense.

    Actually, when you swap , and . to use that standard, it makes perfect sense. It still amounts to 30 thousand pounds (30.000,00) or as you wrote it above, three thousand (3.000,00). Changing standards takes some getting used to, of course. (Germany isn't the only country that swaps the meaning from ours based on my experience in the Mediterranean. Hindi, according to the Linux link, separates every two digits greater than the 100s.)

    And traditional Japanese counting used a comma every fourth digit (1,0000,0000.00) where the number ten-thousand (meaning 'a fullness' and pronounced 'man') is the basis for counting large numbers.

  • Bobbo (unregistered) in reply to SomeCoder
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day?

    I'm not up there earning big bucks, but I like to think I'm worth more than 30 pounds (~60 dollars) per day. I'm off to drink tea in my red phone box.

  • Disgruntled Dutchie (unregistered) in reply to jakkle
    jakkle:
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    I guess it's a bit of a WTF that they have all the digits after that, but technically, it should read 30 pounds per day, right?

    I could be wrong.

    you are wrong. hideously wrong. a comma denotes thousands or millions etc - used before a group of 3 digits eg: 3,000 15,000,500 1,234,567,890,098,765,432.00

    not everyone can be bothered to use it though

    Nice to hear that my whole country are "Hideously Wrong". Gotta love those bad-ass "On-line Attitudes" that keep popping up.

    Thumbs up!

  • Jorge (unregistered) in reply to Disgruntled Dutchie
    Disgruntled Dutchie:
    jakkle:
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    I guess it's a bit of a WTF that they have all the digits after that, but technically, it should read 30 pounds per day, right?

    I could be wrong.

    you are wrong. hideously wrong. a comma denotes thousands or millions etc - used before a group of 3 digits eg: 3,000 15,000,500 1,234,567,890,098,765,432.00

    not everyone can be bothered to use it though

    Nice to hear that my whole country are "Hideously Wrong". Gotta love those bad-ass "On-line Attitudes" that keep popping up.

    Thumbs up!

    You are lucky, is only your country, in my case is just an entire continent

  • real_aardvark (cs)

    'Kay.

    I'm tired. I'm caffeine-free. I have to start work in Bracknell tomorrow. My life is basically over.

    But have any of you idiots actually looked at the dialog box?

    This is not about money, folks. This is not an I18N issue. This is nothing to do with commas, periods (or full stops), quantity of digits between the terminals ... none of that.

    LOOK AT IT!

    35.00 > 24.00.

    Do you follow?

    Remedial math is available at cripplingly high rates. I don't promise you'll pass. I just promise it will hurt.

    But in a good way.

  • David G (unregistered) in reply to jakkle
    jakkle:
    you are wrong. hideously wrong. a comma denotes thousands or millions etc - used before a group of 3 digits eg: 3,000 15,000,500 1,234,567,890,098,765,432.00

    not everyone can be bothered to use it though

    Depends where in the world you come from. A lot of European countries use the full-stop as a thousands separator, and the comma as a decimal point (I suppose, it then becomes the decimal comma).

  • mctaz (unregistered) in reply to real_aardvark
    real_aardvark:
    'Kay.

    I'm tired. I'm caffeine-free. I have to start work in Bracknell tomorrow. My life is basically over.

    But have any of you idiots actually looked at the dialog box?

    This is not about money, folks. This is not an I18N issue. This is nothing to do with commas, periods (or full stops), quantity of digits between the terminals ... none of that.

    LOOK AT IT!

    35.00 > 24.00.

    Do you follow?

    Remedial math is available at cripplingly high rates. I don't promise you'll pass. I just promise it will hurt.

    But in a good way.

    Congrats. You figured out the first one. Now move to the second one and join the rest of us.

  • Schien Dong (unregistered) in reply to Arancaytar

    Sadly I can see how 30,000.00 got created in the first place.

    Most likely there's a database that stores hourly rate as 30 pounds per hour, in 3 decimal precision: 30.000

    The application grabs the data typeless, and probably treats it as a string. Part of the application uses system locale, and in this case, it could be German, and the string becomes "30,000". Another part of the system uses hard-coded American locale, and parse it to a number. Depend on the language, parsing "30,000" in American gives different results, but it's highly imaginable that "30,000.00" is therefore generated.

    my 2 cents captcha: pirates (yes they're cheap and make too many bugs)

  • fake armadillo (unregistered) in reply to real_aardvark

    Wow, way to be an arrogant asshole about something no one else actually misunderstood. (May I suggest a course in reading comprehension?)

  • fake armadillo (unregistered) in reply to real_aardvark

    Er, that rather aggressive post was directed towards this poster:

    real_aardvark:
    But have any of you idiots actually looked at the dialog box?

    This is not about money, folks. This is not an I18N issue. This is nothing to do with commas, periods (or full stops), quantity of digits between the terminals ... none of that.

    LOOK AT IT!

    35.00 > 24.00.

    Do you follow?

    The real WTF is the forum software, and so on, and so on.

  • Disgruntled Dutchie (unregistered) in reply to David G

    True true, I don't know how many European countries like mine (Holland) use the "wrong" system, but in Germany it is even more compilcated, since "3." means third, "4." means fourth etc.

    I was confused when I read things like "You are the 4. costumer today."

  • dkf (unregistered) in reply to fake armadillo
    fake armadillo:
    The real WTF is the forum software, and so on, and so on.
    No, the real WTF is that nobody ever got rid of the Reply button, even though it never did anything useful at all. That is, it's a site admin problem. Guess we see those rather often...
  • sas (cs) in reply to SomeCoder
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    I guess it's a bit of a WTF that they have all the digits after that, but technically, it should read 30 pounds per day, right?

    I could be wrong.

    You've already been corrected about the commas vs. the periods. (I would point out that nobody would write $30.000,00 to mean $30.) However, it clearly says 'per hour', which does not mean 'per day' in any country, regardless of language.

  • sas (cs) in reply to Matthew
    Matthew:
    Shadowman:
    Actually, once you get as far as the 6th of Twent-Quintember, the days are more than 50 hours long.
    That would probably be better written as twent-tritember, assuming we don't get any more narcissistic emperors.

    And don't knock the English date form, unless you think the time should be represented as HH:SS:MM.

    That's just silly. The English time form is MM:SS:HH.
  • Daniel Beardsmore (cs)

    The first one is obvious -- there were 120 hours in that particular day, the 31st February 1992. The submitter simply hadn't been paying attention to the calendar reforms.

    No, the Real WTF is, what was anyone doing using a Win XP lookalike in 1992? Maybe he's the clown responsible for Luna ...

  • standgale (unregistered)

    whatever happened to using ' to denote thousands? eg $30'000.00, or $1'000'000 :D

    Anyway, I'm sure that's what I learnt in school and now no one does it any more. (ps. is "learnt" a word? I was sure it was a word, but it always comes up with a red "you spelt this wrong" line underneath in anything that has a spellchecker. And so does "spelt" apparently. What's up with these spell-checkers?)

    CAPTCHA - what the hell's a vern?

  • Frymaster (unregistered) in reply to sas
    sas:
    Matthew:
    Shadowman:
    Actually, once you get as far as the 6th of Twent-Quintember, the days are more than 50 hours long.
    That would probably be better written as twent-tritember, assuming we don't get any more narcissistic emperors.

    And don't knock the English date form, unless you think the time should be represented as HH:SS:MM.

    That's just silly. The English time form is MM:SS:HH.

    Don't know about the English form, but the British form is HH:MM:SS :P

    I mean, the date would be written out as "The 25th of June, 2007" so it makes that that's how you abbreviate it as well...

  • Raggles (cs) in reply to SomeCoder
    SomeCoder:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't that second one really mean 30 pounds per day? Don't they use the ',' as we Americans use '.' ?

    I guess it's a bit of a WTF that they have all the digits after that, but technically, it should read 30 pounds per day, right?

    I could be wrong.

    Nope. Germans and Swedes do though. This one just means they're showing annual salary instead of hourly rate. I pity the foo' who gets £7.50 a year.

  • Taz (cs) in reply to standgale
    standgale:
    whatever happened to using ' to denote thousands? eg $30'000.00, or $1'000'000 :D

    Anyway, I'm sure that's what I learnt in school and now no one does it any more. (ps. is "learnt" a word? I was sure it was a word, but it always comes up with a red "you spelt this wrong" line underneath in anything that has a spellchecker. And so does "spelt" apparently. What's up with these spell-checkers?)

    As an ass backward country, Switzerland still uses ' as a thousand separator. Avoids confusion. :)

    And your spell-checkers are right. It's "learned" and "spelled". See, no red underline.

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