• Spencer (unregistered) in reply to bbum
    Anonymous:
    Seriously -- long ago, someone decided that each additional CPU added to a system should add 100 to the total amount of CPU available.  So, if you have a quad CPU system, you can see a multithreaded app use up to 400% CPU.

    Happens on most unixes, it seems.
     
    Not on Solaris.  I have to remind myself that "5%" means "100% of one CPU" on my 20-processor "enterprise" server.
     
    Nor is it true on Windows.
     
    Maybe true on Linux.  I haven't used Linux on a multi-processor platform. 
  • ssprencel (cs)
    Anonymous:
    Red5:
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Eric Golpe appreciated Washington state's new public education program: teaching the English alphabet to drivers along the I-5 ...-

    [image]

    This is a good thing. 
    Very beneficial to immigrants that don't know our language yet.

    I find this comment kind of racist....but you just publicy told everyone that and I probably don't need to point it out.

    Of course you find this comment racist.  You have no sense of humor. 

    btw, you do need to point it out because Red5 didn't tell anybody that you found the comments racist. 

  • zemoo (unregistered) in reply to GoatCheez

    It's actually worse than that -- from the looks of it they used a software package like Systran from French->English on a text which had grammatical errors to begin with.

    "Nous sommes affligés" --> we are very sorry (afflicted)
    "Nous sommes affliger" --> we are to afflict

    "est causée" --> is caused
    "est cause" --> east cause??

    Not only can't they afford a translation budget, they can't afford to hire someone with a high school diploma

  • Blah (unregistered) in reply to Saladin
    Saladin:

    Pap:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't those peanut bags say "Alergy Warning: May contain nuts" because although the peanut is not a nut, they are often processed with the same equipment that is used to process nuts at the same facility?

    There are some peanut products out there (like, say, peanut butter) that say "Warning: may contain peanuts" on them.  It's pretty astounding at how some people need the obvious stated to them (you mean I'll get fat if I eat McDonald's 3 meals per day every day?)

     

    I'm just going to assume the sarcasmSLASHhumour got lost in the post, because the idea that a peanut is not a nut troubles my entire belief system. I'm sure many anaphylactics agree...

  • ssprencel (cs) in reply to Blah
    Anonymous:
    Saladin:

    Pap:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't those peanut bags say "Alergy Warning: May contain nuts" because although the peanut is not a nut, they are often processed with the same equipment that is used to process nuts at the same facility?

    There are some peanut products out there (like, say, peanut butter) that say "Warning: may contain peanuts" on them.  It's pretty astounding at how some people need the obvious stated to them (you mean I'll get fat if I eat McDonald's 3 meals per day every day?)

     

    I'm just going to assume the sarcasmSLASHhumour got lost in the post, because the idea that a peanut is not a nut troubles my entire belief system. I'm sure many anaphylactics agree...

    Sorry for the trouble on your belief system but a peanut is a Legume.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peanut

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legume

    Up is down, left is Black, and Boolean is defined by True, False and FileNotFound.

     

  • john (unregistered) in reply to Spencer

    Not to discount all the thinking that's gone into my powerbook's (not macbook) activity monitor display, but as the submitter of the screenshot, I can verify that it was on an 800 mhz ppc TiBook, obviously single-core, one processor, not over-clocked or anything. The hard part was actually taking the screenshot, since the system had ground to somewhere between a halt and a crawl while the video was rendering. I saw it as high as 130% though. It actually happens pretty regularly with Final Cut (whenever I render a lot or export), but I haven't seen it with any other apps, even when the load average is up at 30 or so. I have no idea what Final Cut is doing to make this happen.

  • Alexis de Torquemada (cs) in reply to Blah

    Anonymous:
    the idea that a peanut is not a nut troubles my entire belief system. I'm sure many anaphylactics agree...

    Actually, many culinary nuts are actually stone fruit kernels (e.g. almonds, brazil nuts, pistachios, cashew nuts).

    Let's trouble your belief system some more...

    Which of these is a botanical berry?

    a) Raspberry

    b) Strawberry

    c) Bell pepper

    d) Blackberry

    :-p

  • hans müller (unregistered)

    "So who want's to guess what really happened when Eugene Kaganovich clicked Yes ..."

    In Germany, we call this a Deppenapostroph.

  • WIldpeaks (cs) in reply to Trinian

    Anonymous:
    The other real WTF is that signing up for the online banking service somehow requires Adobe Acrobat.  What exactly would you need Acrobat for - to print out the application form, sign it, take a picture on a wooden table, scan the picture, and then e-mail it to the bank?

    You forgot "folding the picture (twi for more security) and fax it like that".

  • WIldpeaks (cs) in reply to WIldpeaks

    I probably should have submitted this one as well:

    Hint: 5:32 is the only correct value.

    [image]

    That prooves the saying "two wrongs don't make a right" :-)

  • Anonymous (unregistered) in reply to WIldpeaks
    WIldpeaks:

    That prooves the saying "two wrongs don't make a right" :-)

    Thats because it takes 3 wrong [left turns] to make a right [turn].

  • Anonymous (unregistered) in reply to Anonymous
    Anonymous:
    WIldpeaks:

    That prooves the saying "two wrongs don't make a right" :-)

    Thats because it takes 3 wrong [left turns] to make a right [turn].

    People always forget to take their test cases beyond 2, thus never finding the point at which their test or hypothesis fails.

  • Rich (unregistered)
    Anonymous:

    I find this comment kind of racist....but you just publicy told everyone that and I probably don't need to point it out.

    I find it kind-of racist that you assume immigrants can't be WASPs.

     

    Rich 

  • Andreas Pumpkin (unregistered)
    Anonymous:

    Another one most people don't know: a pumpkin is a fruit. 

     

    Hey dude, I let you in on a secret and you out me to the whole world? WTF!

     

  • John (unregistered) in reply to Blah

    They recently added little stickers reading "Caution, Hot" to the hot water taps in Microsoft break rooms.

     I sold all my stock the other day.

     

  • I8ABug2Day (cs) in reply to GoatCheez

    Mine has four dual-core 64-bit CPU's.  (I like Super-Micro and Tyan server boards)  Depending on how I configure the view on the resource monitor, (or which switches I use on the CLI), it will show either the usage per CPU core as percentage, usage of total CPU resource as percentage, or cumulative process usage of CPU as a percentage.  Funny thing is, it seems to ignore how many CPUs there are in the last mode, and it has shown up to 740% CPU usage total.

     So it's not really a bug.  More like a lapse of judgement.
     

  • WIldpeaks (cs)

    The MP3 header in this file (assuming it's an MP3, of course) and the actual data are out of sync.

    I'm guessing something like this as well, but it's funny that it uses two different ways of finding the length (top and bottom), I would assume programming-wise that one would have been enough (whether it returns a good value or not being less relevant)  :-)

  • DaBookshah (unregistered) in reply to Rich
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:

    That's their subtle way of telling us that they're removing the letter 'Z' from the alphabet :-o 

    Zed's dead, baby.



    Lol, hitchhikers guide to the galaxy maybe?

    Captcha:WTF
  • foxyshadis (cs) in reply to john

    Anonymous:
    Not to discount all the thinking that's gone into my powerbook's (not macbook) activity monitor display, but as the submitter of the screenshot, I can verify that it was on an 800 mhz ppc TiBook, obviously single-core, one processor, not over-clocked or anything. The hard part was actually taking the screenshot, since the system had ground to somewhere between a halt and a crawl while the video was rendering. I saw it as high as 130% though. It actually happens pretty regularly with Final Cut (whenever I render a lot or export), but I haven't seen it with any other apps, even when the load average is up at 30 or so. I have no idea what Final Cut is doing to make this happen.

    On windows, this can happen if you're dumb enough to set something like that up as realtime priority, or if the application designer did it for you. Kernel threads get delayed, and if it's in the top couple priority levels even hardware interrupts are delayed or missed entirely. Usually your system either bluescreens or just plain stops responding in any way if you do that; it's like using windows 3.1 all over again! I know you can do the same thing if you run something as root on linux, and I'm pretty sure you can on unixes, I'm just not sure how.

  • movie lover (unregistered) in reply to DaBookshah

    Pulp Fiction!

  • Drum D. (unregistered)

    Ah hell, I'm too lazy to log in.

     

    Top 2 of this Potpury:

    1. O-H-O, man that is chemistry. They should go for  the nobel price.

    2. Washington electronic street sign. Nice alphabet, but lost the Z. No teaching immigranz wizout it.
     

  • Bellinghman (cs) in reply to WIldpeaks
    WIldpeaks:

    The MP3 header in this file (assuming it's an MP3, of course) and the actual data are out of sync.

    I'm guessing something like this as well, but it's funny that it uses two different ways of finding the length (top and bottom), I would assume programming-wise that one would have been enough (whether it returns a good value or not being less relevant)  :-)



    The problem being that you want the fast one (read the header) when displaying the track listing, but when actually playing, you display the real one ("how long have I been doing this"). It might take an appreciable proportion of the track's actual playing time to find out how long it really takes to play it.

    Yeah, it's funny. But inconsistent data often looks stupid.
  • ender (cs) in reply to WIldpeaks
    WIldpeaks:

    [image]

    That prooves the saying "two wrongs don't make a right" :-)

    Was the song encoded with Fraunhofer MP3 encoder? That one doesn't add the Xing VBR header, so WinAmp guesses the song length from the first frame and file length.
    Speaking of VBR MP3 WTFs, long ago when I tried playing a VBR MP3 in an old version of WinDVD, the progress bar and played time in player went completely nuts, jumping all over the place. The song did play fine though.

  • Yetiheh (unregistered) in reply to GoatCheez

    I see it very often on pentiums.

     captcha: random (yes, it's not every time)
     

  • Loren Pechtel (unregistered) in reply to Saladin
    Saladin:

    Pap:
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't those peanut bags say "Alergy Warning: May contain nuts" because although the peanut is not a nut, they are often processed with the same equipment that is used to process nuts at the same facility?

    There are some peanut products out there (like, say, peanut butter) that say "Warning: may contain peanuts" on them.  It's pretty astounding at how some people need the obvious stated to them (you mean I'll get fat if I eat McDonald's 3 meals per day every day?)

     

    Or how about the may contain fish or shellfish warning at Long John Silver's?  I admit you can buy chicken there but what do you expect in a fish place?!

     

    However, the board seems to agree with the warning.  Captcha: clueless
     

  • Loren Pechtel (unregistered)
    Anonymous:
    Red5:

    This is a good thing. 
    Very beneficial to immigrants that don't know our language yet.

    I find this comment kind of racist....but you just publicy told everyone that and I probably don't need to point it out.

    What's racist about admitting some immigrants come here not knowing English?  It took my wife a long time to learn to alphabetize as her native language has no such concept.

  • NancyBoy (unregistered) in reply to Rich
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:

    I find this comment kind of racist....but you just publicy told everyone that and I probably don't need to point it out.

    I find it kind-of racist that you assume immigrants can't be WASPs.

     

    Rich 

    I find it kind of obnoxious that humorless PC nags get rankled by totally innocuous statements, and then post here to display their ignorance of the meanings of words like "racist".

    (And no one assumed immigrants can't be WASPs, they only assumed that they could be, say, from India, China, Mexico, or other places where many people don't speak English.  Not only are you pedantic, you're wrong in your pedantry.)

    Captcha:  clueless (how appropriate)

  • Andreas Pumpkin (unregistered) in reply to NancyBoy
    Anonymous:

    I find it kind of obnoxious that humorless PC nags get rankled by totally innocuous statements, and then post here to display their ignorance of the meanings of words like "racist".

    (And no one assumed immigrants can't be WASPs, they only assumed that they could be, say, from India, China, Mexico, or other places where many people don't speak English.  Not only are you pedantic, you're wrong in your pedantry.)

    Captcha:  clueless (how appropriate)

    nancyboy: I was criticizing the criticizer. In saying that the comment about immigrants was racist, he was himself making racial assumptions.

    Rich 

  • codeman38 (cs)
    Anonymous:

    "spreading the hot good"

    I love it!  


    Personally, I rather like the "characteristicseses".  Was this translated by Gollum or something?
  • diGriz (cs)
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Not only it's H2O (instead of HO2), it also ain't the chemical equation (as claimed in the original), but the chemical formula of water.

     

    Aw heck, and while we're on the subject of driving, John Lenz discovered one of the few intersections in the United States where a "rolling stop" is actually required ...

    [image]

    I actually had to google for this, because I've never seen it before. Does "No stopping any time" mean "don't stop even if someone else has the right of way"?

  • Quinnum (cs) in reply to quamaretto
    quamaretto:
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Eric Golpe appreciated Washington state's new public education program: teaching the English alphabet to drivers along the I-5 ...-

    [image]

     

    No no no, this is the Alphabet Alert System, to let us know when an alphabet has been kidnapped. Are you a bad enough dude to rescure the Alphabet?

    Now that it's gone, of course, there's really no way of knowing when we'll run out of lette

     

    Of course, by the time it's Christmas, there will be no 'L' 

     

  • Cratig (cs) in reply to Trinian

    Anonymous:
    The other real WTF is that signing up for the online banking service somehow requires Adobe Acrobat.  What exactly would you need Acrobat for - to print out the application form, sign it, take a picture on a wooden table, scan the picture, and then e-mail it to the bank?

     

    +10 points for you!!

     

    A very well structured and thoughtout use of the wooden table saga!

  • Philip (unregistered)

    The 101% CPU usage on the Macbook is nothing special: The machine has two CPU (cores). If an application uses both cores, the usage can in theory grow up to 200% in theory.

     

    Philip 

  • Irrelevant (cs)
    Anonymous:

    diGriz:
    I actually had to google for this, because I've never seen it before. Does "No stopping any time" mean "don't stop even if someone else has the right of way"?

    There's multiple meanings to "stop" when it comes to traffic law.  (Of course.)  The obvious meaning is coming to a stop at a stop sign.

    The second meaning is essentially parking without turning the engine off.  In a "no stopping" zone, you can't stop and leave the car running while picking up people or loading the car or anything like that.

    Stopping in that sense is generally legal in a "no parking" zone, since the driver can move the car should the need arise (as the car's still running and the driver is still in the driver's seat).  However, in some areas, stopping in that sense is not allowed - those are "no stopping" zones.

    You're always allowed to stop the car for stop signs (duh) and for emergency reasons (someone running in front of the car, another car stopping, and on).

    However, in some places, you aren't allowed to stop as if to park.

    Googling for "no stopping zone" gives a bunch of pages that sort of explain the difference, but the best appears to be Vancouver's page on stopping vs parking.

    In Britain, we call parking with the engine running "loading", 'cos presumably you're transferring something/someone in/out of the car. Clears up the ambiguity, altho I still had to ask WTF "loading" was.
  • Ray Magini (unregistered)

    we don't know what their Box Office Fee is...

  • pl (unregistered) in reply to GoatCheez
    GoatCheez:
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    The CPU at 105% isn't a bug, it is a feature!

    Seriously -- long ago, someone decided that each additional CPU added to a system should add 100 to the total amount of CPU available.  So, if you have a quad CPU system, you can see a multithreaded app use up to 400% CPU. 

    Neat, huh?

    Happens on most unixes, it seems.

    I'm not saying it is a terribly good design decision, but it was a purposeful decision, none-the-less.

    Any relation to overclocking?

    NO. Definitely not. they'd have to read the processor's ID to know what it's default clock is, and then they'd have to figure out the current clock to come up with the new max... So, NO, definitely not.

     So does that happen on linux? I've never noticed cpu usage > 100% on my dual core ...
     

    I do get the same result on linux so its a unix feature

  • Marc (unregistered)

    ... that the site famous-quote.com is STILL not fixed, a year and a half later.

  • madjo (cs)
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:

    [image]

    The 'O' in H2O is a letter, not a number

     Uhh... Tell me again how this is related to the particular wtf? Sure in H2O the H and O are letters which stand for hydrogen and oxygen, and obviously 2 is a number, but in the picture the molecule structure appears to be O-H-O, when it should be H-O-H, two Hydrogen atoms, one Oxygen atom make one H2O molecule. So the AD failed chemistry, big deal... Not crap, craptastic!
     

    ...Please note the filename of the screenshot...

  • madjo (cs)
    Anonymous:
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Aw heck, and while we're on the subject of driving, John Lenz discovered one of the few intersections in the United States where a "rolling stop" is actually required ...

    [image]

     

    Actually, this tell the driver to "stop to give way" but not "stop the car (i.e.: turn off engine)" here.

    The meaning of "STOP" sign is clearly stated in the traffic sign guide. It's not really a WTF.

    For you maybe, but for non-native english speakers, this is definitely a puzzler. Stop is stop, right?.
    So you are not allowed to stop at any time, while you have to stop to give way.
    The little sign clearly states that under no circumstance you may stop there, but you have to stop to give way. This could be a way for the county to rake in the money from traffic-violations, because there is no way that you can adhere to both rules. :)

    Now if it said 'no parking any time', it would have been more clear (though there is indeed a difference between stopping and parking, this difference IMO is not really warranted, but that is another story) :)

  • madjo (cs)

    WTF does being a "non-native english speaker" have to do with knowing how to drive? 

    This is a traffic sign.  The meaning of the sign is defined by statute- not by Webster's

    Yes, the large STOP sign, I know that one from our own traffic-rules too...  (I'm dutch)
    but the second (smaller) one is too ambiguous.
    I, myself, would most certainly say WTF if I would encounter them 'in the wild'. And will probably not understand immediately what was meant with that sign.

    I used the wrong word in my initial post.. I actually meant "someone who did not originally come from America" (or wherever that photo was taken) (Sorry, I'm not a native english speaking person, I'm only Dutch)

  • VirtudyneEmployeeNumber423290123 (unregistered) in reply to madjo
    madjo:

    WTF does being a "non-native english speaker" have to do with knowing how to drive? 

    This is a traffic sign.  The meaning of the sign is defined by statute- not by Webster's

    Yes, the large STOP sign, I know that one from our own traffic-rules too...  (I'm dutch)
    but the second (smaller) one is too ambiguous.
    I, myself, would most certainly say WTF if I would encounter them 'in the wild'. And will probably not understand immediately what was meant with that sign.

    I used the wrong word in my initial post.. I actually meant "someone who did not originally come from America" (or wherever that photo was taken) (Sorry, I'm not a native english speaking person, I'm only Dutch)

     

    And this is why nobody can drive properly.   The rules of the road aren't always the same everywhere (even from state to state here in the USA, let alone different countries).  Nobody should drive anywhere for any reason without knowing the local rules.


    I live in southern Texas, and there are some of the worst drivers in the world here.  Does anyone really need to be driving F-350 at 90 miles an hour in a school zone while talking on a cell phone and making an illegal blind left turn into the far lane?  And don't get me started on yellow lights, they don't mean "Hurry up, here comes red! (and the three seconds after the light turns red where you are apparently still allowed to enter the intersection)".    {road rage subsiding.... deep breath.... }
     

     (Coming soon, TheDailyDrivingWTF.com [tm] )

     

  • It's a Feature (cs) in reply to Trinian

    Anonymous:
    The other real WTF is that signing up for the online banking service somehow requires Adobe Acrobat.  What exactly would you need Acrobat for - to print out the application form, sign it, take a picture on a wooden table, scan the picture, and then e-mail it to the bank?

     LOL!  This is a credit union--the credit union is simply making it easy for the user to get the application form ahead of time and print it out at home, where the user will complete it with a pen, sign it, then mail it in, or more likely, hand deliver it.  The credit union is most likely located right at the place most users would work, anyhow (kinda the nature of credit unions).

  • It's a Feature (cs)
    Anonymous:
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    You can really have a lot of fun with "4 consecutive invalid logins will disable your account" if you know someone's user id...or even if you don't, you could have fun guessing. That's really going to inconvience the hacker scripts a lot.

     

     

    Yep, that's the point.  You don't find too many hackers playing around trying to actually disable someone's id just for the fun of it.  If it happened too often, the user would just change userids.  Try randomly hitting a valid userid--when there are only a couple of thousand valid userids and valid characters are any character, with any length userid.

  • anonymous (unregistered) in reply to It's a Feature

    It's a Feature:
    You don't find too many hackers playing around trying to actually disable someone's id just for the fun of it.  If it happened too often, the user would just change userids.  Try randomly hitting a valid userid--when there are only a couple of thousand valid userids and valid characters are any character, with any length userid.

     Well.  "Candy" can make fun of "John" with that feature. Dropping his ability to log-in to make fun of him.
     

     

     

  • It's a Feature (cs)
    Anonymous:
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    The real WTF is why they're using a web application that breaks the "Back" button... 

     Actually, I'm not sure it really does break anything. 

    There's a pretty simple explanation:

     The original programmer may or may not have uncovered a problem with clicking "back" at inconvenient times, so threw the warning message out there just to scare users from using the back button.

     The current programmer supporting the application (me), never bothered to put the warning message to the test.  The code has changed a lot and so the original reason for the message may or may not still exist.  I've tried playing with it a couple of times and haven't found anything.  I think it's more a scare tactic than anything (WTF?).

     

    And if you're wondering about the maintenance window, I can explain that, but it'll lose it's WTF fun.  Looks hilarious when you don't know the details.  But basically, the credit union was merging with an altogether different credit union--I needed to get site to come down at 5 pm on 9/28 and have it stay down forever.  I could have posted a message that said something along those lines, but that took too much work.  The maintenance window message was easy to have come up--basically enter the datetime when the system comes down and the number of hours (it calculates the time back up from the number of hours), and these figures are stored in a database.  So I just put the 9/28/2006 5 pm date and entered 10,000 hours.  I know it's the lazy solution, but WTF?  The Credit Union never complained, and now they don't exist, anyhow...

  • It's a Feature (cs) in reply to anonymous
    Anonymous:

    It's a Feature:
    You don't find too many hackers playing around trying to actually disable someone's id just for the fun of it.  If it happened too often, the user would just change userids.  Try randomly hitting a valid userid--when there are only a couple of thousand valid userids and valid characters are any character, with any length userid.

     Well.  "Candy" can make fun of "John" with that feature. Dropping his ability to log-in to make fun of him.
     

     

     

    Yes--until "John" gets smart and changes his userid, assuming "Candy" knew his userid in the first place (which is generally not public knowledge on a banking site).

  • RangerNS (unregistered) in reply to Trinian

    Well, just last week, signing some financing "papers" at a car dealership, one of them was electronic, using Acrobat and one of those signature pad thingers. Of course, you cant expect any joe out on the interweb to have on of those at their PC.

     

    But in any event, some places can be fairly anal about their paperwork; the easiest way to produce an online form exactly like the paper one is to use Acrobat and have it submit the values back. It may be the case of: fill this out and we will start processing it now; print it out, sign it, mail it in, as a signature is required for completion of the process. The partial processing would be a step up from not being able to electronicly submit it at all...

  • llwang (unregistered) in reply to bbum
    Anonymous:
    The CPU at 105% isn't a bug, it is a feature!

    Seriously -- long ago, someone decided that each additional CPU added to a system should add 100 to the total amount of CPU available.  So, if you have a quad CPU system, you can see a multithreaded app use up to 400% CPU. 

    Neat, huh?

    Happens on most unixes, it seems.

    I'm not saying it is a terribly good design decision, but it was a purposeful decision, none-the-less.

    A friend of mine's box reports this:

      PID USERNAME   THR PRI NICE   SIZE    RES STATE  C   TIME   WCPU COMMAND
    64045 www          1  83    0 76136K 75544K select 2 618:41 7518.75% lighttpd
    40097 nobody       1   4    0   265M   264M kqread 2  17:21 7518.75% memcached
    39970 in2          1   4    0  6768K  6096K kqread 2   6:06 3358.64% perl5.8.8
    72336 www          1   4    0 42236K 13032K accept 3   0:07 67.63% php
    72344 www          1  82    0 41428K 12244K select 3   0:06 64.65% php

    It must be very costly with that many cpu's.

  • Anonymous (unregistered) in reply to A/C gal
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:
    The CPU at 105% isn't a bug, it is a feature!

    Seriously -- long ago, someone decided that each additional CPU added to a system should add 100 to the total amount of CPU available.  So, if you have a quad CPU system, you can see a multithreaded app use up to 400% CPU. 

    Neat, huh?

    Happens on most unixes, it seems.

    I'm not saying it is a terribly good design decision, but it was a purposeful decision, none-the-less.

    Any relation to overclocking?

    NO...did he say anything at all about over clocking? MULTIPLE PROCESSORS that has nothing to do with over clocking

    Why don't people listen before they speak?

    BTW my CAPTCHA is Craptastic... how appropriate

  • uep (unregistered) in reply to Rich
    Anonymous:
    Anonymous:

    That's their subtle way of telling us that they're removing the letter 'Z' from the alphabet :-o 

    Zed's dead, baby.

     

    Rich 

    That's one of my favorite lines from Pulp Fiction.  I also like Christopher Walken's monologue...

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