• aa (unregistered)

    That question mark icon is sooo awesome!

  • GUI (unregistered)

    The Confirm dialog is well designed. It offers alternatives for the handicapped and for the rest in case either their mouse or keyboard is broken.

    If you click OK you close.

    If you press OK you continue.

    So, where's the problem?

    BTW...</irony>

  • aremmes (unregistered)

    "Enhance your programming"? How about THEY enhance their programming?!

  • Zemyla (unregistered)

    Character 8260 is the fraction slash. The form is saying that the distance is 1 1/2" away.

  • That Troper (unregistered)
    1. Do A BARREL ROLL!

    Seriously, why can't they just say something like:

    Do: 1. 2. 3.

    Do NOT: 4. 5. 6.

    "Do add a comment" sounds stupid.

  • Ethan Qix (unregistered) in reply to Zemyla
    Zemyla:
    Character 8260 is the fraction slash. The form is saying that the distance is 1 1/2" away.

    You know that, we know that, but the stardard user doesn't speak HTML as fluently as we do :)

  • TwelveBaud (cs)

    The problem with the website dialog one is that the website is ultra-narcissistic. It assumes that you trying to close/navigate away from its awesomeness is an error, and that you really want to continue using it, rather than closing it. "Continue" in their text means "continue using I'm Too Awesome To Let You Leave."

    Safari, on the other hand, assumes you wanted to, you know, do what you were trying to do. "Continue" in its text means "continue leaving I'm Too Awesome To Let You Leave."

    Personally, I blame Awesome's marketing department.

  • jspenguin (cs)

    It's possible the browser adds the second line of instructions by itself. I'm not sure what browser it is though. It could also be a web app framework that is adding the extra line.

    When you look at it in context, both lines are saying the same thing. The first line is saying 'click Cancel to continue'. The second line says 'click OK to continue closing.'

    Still confusing, though.

  • Shmork (unregistered)

    Is there a reason that browsers don't let you override javascript alerts or confirms? They seem to be used for evil 90% of the time; it would be great if there was a button them that in effect did a "close this confirm/alert, and stop all further javascript execution on this page, because it is evil."

  • Someone You Know (cs) in reply to jspenguin
    jspenguin:
    It's possible the browser adds the second line of instructions by itself. I'm not sure what browser it is though. It could also be a web app framework that is adding the extra line.

    When you look at it in context, both lines are saying the same thing. The first line is saying 'click Cancel to continue'. The second line says 'click OK to continue closing.'

    Still confusing, though.

    In most browsers, if you return some string from an onbeforeunload() function, the browser will generate that confirmation dialog with your return value in the middle paragraph. In this case the return value was "Click OK to close, or Cancel to continue."

  • TarquinWJ (cs)

    Peter D's one just looks like someone putting a silly message into the event.returnValue of a JavaScript beforeunload event, intentionally the opposite of the default message that also appears there. You could whip one of them up in 2 seconds just for fun - probably what already happened.

    That Troper:
    Seriously, why can't they just say something like:

    Do not:

    1. <do something really bad>

    2.

    Because idiots^Wusers rarely read. They would not see the "do not" and instead would just see the bullet point "<do something really bad>", which they would then do, even though they weren't supposed to.

  • TarquinWJ (cs) in reply to Shmork
    Shmork:
    Is there a reason that browsers don't let you override javascript alerts or confirms? They seem to be used for evil 90% of the time; it would be great if there was a button them that in effect did a "close this confirm/alert, and stop all further javascript execution on this page, because it is evil."

    Opera does this.

  • Infi (unregistered)

    The line in the middle of the confirm dialog box is provided by the webpage, not the browser. The intention being to allow the page to provide a reason why you might not want to close it - for example "There are unsaved changes on this page - if you close now you will lose these changes". Instead, this web developer chose to use it to write some manic ramblings about OK and Cancel buttons.

  • Maurits (cs)

    &8260; is a slash, of course: http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/2044/index.htm

    That's what you get for using them fancy characters.

  • Jay (unregistered) in reply to Ethan Qix
    Ethan Qix:
    Zemyla:
    Character 8260 is the fraction slash. The form is saying that the distance is 1 1/2" away.

    You know that, we know that, but the stardard user doesn't speak HTML as fluently as we do :)

    Even for those "in the know", the effect is not necessarily the same. I could give you a list of the hex values of pixel colors from a beautiful painting -- #091A24 #091B24 #091B22 etc. It would be the same information as the painting, but I don't think it would have the same esthetic value.

  • Anonymoose (unregistered) in reply to aremmes

    Bell actually allows you to login & change what channels you have on your own , it's pretty nifty..when it works

  • Natalie B (unregistered) in reply to Jay
    Jay:
    Ethan Qix:
    Zemyla:
    Character 8260 is the fraction slash. The form is saying that the distance is 1 1/2" away.

    You know that, we know that, but the stardard user doesn't speak HTML as fluently as we do :)

    Even for those "in the know", the effect is not necessarily the same. I could give you a list of the hex values of pixel colors from a beautiful painting -- #091A24 #091B24 #091B22 etc. It would be the same information as the painting, but I don't think it would have the same esthetic value.

    Aesthetic? Colored ASCII art would have the same aesthetic value, although the file size would be quite large compared to the original...

  • lolwtf (cs)

    The confirm prompt is poorly worded (as the browser adds the first and last lines, and whoever designed it failed to account for that), but if you consider that the first and third lines go together and the second is out of place, it works. The first one says "click OK to close the page, or cancel to continue using it." The second says "click OK to continue navigating away from this page, or cancel to stay on it."

    A WTF for sure, but there is sense to be made.

  • xtremezone (cs)

    I like how if you give somebody else permission to abuse your credit card you aren't necessarily liable. ;D Probably, but not necessarily.

  • moz (unregistered) in reply to xtremezone
    xtremezone:
    I like how if you give somebody else permission to abuse your credit card you aren't necessarily liable. ;D Probably, but not necessarily.
    If the other person has a knife, they may let you off. Or, for that matter, if one of you has some decent blackmail material on an MBNA executive.
  • Carnildo (cs) in reply to Shmork
    Shmork:
    Is there a reason that browsers don't let you override javascript alerts or confirms? They seem to be used for evil 90% of the time; it would be great if there was a button them that in effect did a "close this confirm/alert, and stop all further javascript execution on this page, because it is evil."

    Opera does that.

  • Nobody (unregistered)

    legalize != legalese

  • David (unregistered)

    Every time I write JavaScript, I want to stab the person who decided that 'OK' and 'Cancel' were the only buttons you would ever need in a dialog. Arghhh.

  • Mr.'; Drop Database -- (unregistered) in reply to TarquinWJ
    TarquinWJ:
    Shmork:
    Is there a reason that browsers don't let you override javascript alerts or confirms? They seem to be used for evil 90% of the time; it would be great if there was a button them that in effect did a "close this confirm/alert, and stop all further javascript execution on this page, because it is evil."
    Opera does this.
    It also ignores the unload event, bypassing this particular evil altogether.
  • darkmage0707077 (unregistered)

    This comment is false.

  • Arancaytar (cs)

    The error message is particularly funny if you will remember that most error messages today might as well have an implicit "Get your kid to fix your computer." appended to it.

  • www.learn-english-online.org (unregistered) in reply to Nobody
    Nobody:
    legalize != legalese
    Yes, I came here to post the same thing.

    I don't expect the people who submit to this site to be fluent in English, but I at least expect it of the person posting the articles on the site.

  • Stop with the "first" posting. (unregistered) in reply to Shmork
    Comment held for moderation.
  • JAck (unregistered) in reply to www.learn-english-online.org
    www.learn-english-online.org:
    Nobody:
    legalize != legalese
    Yes, I came here to post the same thing.

    I don't expect the people who submit to this site to be fluent in English, but I at least expect it of the person posting the articles on the site.

    I see I'm not the only one who was wondering what we were actually leaglising....

  • hsk (unregistered) in reply to Shmork
    Shmork:
    Is there a reason that browsers don't let you override javascript alerts or confirms? They seem to be used for evil 90% of the time; it would be great if there was a button them that in effect did a "close this confirm/alert, and stop all further javascript execution on this page, because it is evil."

    Its called NoScript.

  • Wyrd-Mr.CantTellJokeFromSeriousToday (unregistered)

    lol

    That's a legalese wtf, that's what that is. funny.

    -- Furry cows moo and decompress.

  • Dick Riculous (unregistered)

    That's intentionally confusing. The top and bottom lines are automatically displayed by the browser. The middle line is added by the JavaScript to get you to click the wrong button and thus avoid leaving the page.

  • aion kina (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • runescape money (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • silkroad gold (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.

Leave a comment on “Serious Self-Service”

Log In or post as a guest

Replying to comment #:

« Return to Article