• Jon (unregistered)

    Wow.... just wow

  • Mike (unregistered)

    Wonderful...

  • Cody (unregistered)

    The real WTF is that he wasn't greeted as the hero he is.

  • mbvlist (cs)

    That is plane awesome. I would probably just look for another job at that point, and in the meanwhile do just what they ask me to do. But hey, i'm kind of stupid and stubborn at that point.

     

    At my company, things aren't very good, but at least positive input is considered... 

  • oranda (unregistered)

    The director paid good money for those seven pages! Think of how gypped he would have been if those consultants had only provided him with 2-3 pages :)

     

  • Monday (unregistered) in reply to oranda

    Change the font size and you've almost doubled your output!

  • Tuldas (unregistered) in reply to oranda

    Seven feet of buggy code, not seven pages.

  • unklegwar (cs) in reply to mbvlist
    mbvlist:

    That is plane awesome.

    Nah, it's train awesome. Maybe even automobile awesome.

    Plane awesome would just be too plain.

     

     

  • Kodi (cs)

    Daren you are my hero! Those things must be the size of grapefruits !

  • unklegwar (cs) in reply to Tuldas

    Anonymous:
    Seven feet of buggy code, not seven pages.

    I can't wait. Next review I'm promoting that I wrote a good 731 yards of code.

    This is just like measuring distance in units of time: "How far is it to your house from here?" "Oh, about 20 minutes"

     

     

  • Dwayne (unregistered)
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Daren printed out the Page_Load() method using a half-spaced six-point font with two "screens" per page. He highlighted the buggy and incorrect code, spliced the pages together, and went back to The Director's office. In a move that may not have been the wisest career choice, Daren held the first page in the air above his head and let the other taped-together pages cascade to the floor. With over seven-feet of highlighted code in hand, Daren said: "this is what's wrong with the code."

    YES.  This was the correct response, career-limiting or not.  I would pay good money to see the look on the Director's face at that point.

  • shadowman (cs) in reply to Tuldas

    Anonymous:
    Seven feet of buggy code, not seven pages.

     

    So actually 7.63 pages, using 8.5x11" paper.

    Unless you don't count the margins...
     

  • Tel Janin (unregistered) in reply to shadowman
    shadowman:

    Anonymous:
    Seven feet of buggy code, not seven pages.

    So actually 7.63 pages, using 8.5x11" paper.

    Unless you don't count the margins...

    He said it was printed 2 pages per sheet, so it was most likely printed 2 portrait shaped pages, side by side, lanscaped on the paper.  So, really 9.88 sheets...

     

    captha: knowhutimean 

  • Kiasyn (unregistered) in reply to Cody

    amen!

  • Kiasyn (unregistered) in reply to Kiasyn

    that was to the ' The real WTF is that he wasn't greeted as the hero he is.' quote >_>

  • BA (unregistered) in reply to shadowman

    Seven feet of 6 point half-spaced code. With two "screens" per page.

    You're looking at over 1000 lines of bad code.

    Captcha: quality, not to be confused with quantity
     

  • mbvlist (cs) in reply to unklegwar

    yeah, sorry. I'm not using my English enough lately :(

     

    WTF! Why can't I repair a typo after 10 minutes? The Biggest WTF (tm) is this forum :(
     

  • Anonymous (unregistered) in reply to shadowman

    If the printout had two screens per page, then they presumably were printed landscape, so the number of pages would be 9.88.

  • kuroshin (cs)
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Daren printed out the Page_Load() method using a half-spaced six-point font with two "screens" per page. He highlighted the buggy and incorrect code, spliced the pages together, and went back to The Director's office. In a move that may not have been the wisest career choice, Daren held the first page in the air above his head and let the other taped-together pages cascade to the floor. With over seven-feet of highlighted code in hand, Daren said: "this is what's wrong with the code."

    Oh wait, did you say that only the Page_Load() method was seven feet long ? 

    *shudders* 

  • Rob (unregistered) in reply to mbvlist

    It's fly

  • mare (unregistered) in reply to Anonymous

    Who would use feet to measure length anyway?

  • shadowman (cs) in reply to Tel Janin
    Anonymous:
    shadowman:

    Anonymous:
    Seven feet of buggy code, not seven pages.

    So actually 7.63 pages, using 8.5x11" paper.

    Unless you don't count the margins...

    He said it was printed 2 pages per sheet, so it was most likely printed 2 portrait shaped pages, side by side, lanscaped on the paper.  So, really 9.88 sheets...

    Well, lets assume 1" margins on all sides and 7 feet of actual code, so close to 13 pages, really.

  • Anonymous (unregistered) in reply to Cody
    Comment held for moderation.
  • ASG Refuge (unregistered)

    Personally, I would have used a 12 point font, and regular spacing. That would have given him 14+ feet of highlighted code. The door might not have hit him on the way out.

    Career suicide  can be awe inspiring it you are standing far enough back not to get hit by the flying body parts (and blame). I once got to see a neophyte programmer do it by trying to suck up to the company owner. The owner had just finished tearing the entier programming staff a new orifice; and the neo's final words were ".... you must have kissed the blarney stone". The neo was never heard from again.

  • tekiegreg (unregistered)

    Hey if he's looking for a job, lives in Orange County, CA and is as honest as claimed in the post, I have a job for him. Reply to thread w/email if interested...

  • WhiteEcho (unregistered) in reply to Anonymous
    Comment held for moderation.
  • MrData (cs) in reply to ASG Refuge

    Anonymous:

    ...and the neo's final words were ".... you must have kissed the blarney stone". The neo was never heard from again.

     See?  Now THAT'S how the Matrix sequels should have been written!
     

  • Karl von L. (unregistered)

    The real WTF is that he had to tape the pages together manually to get the desired cascade effect. Back in the good old days of perforated sprocket-fed dot matrix paper he would have gotten the effect for free.

  • R.Flowers (cs) in reply to mare

    Anonymous:
    Who would use feet to measure length anyway?

    I use my hands, and a tape measure. 

  • Vector (cs) in reply to mare

    Anonymous:
    Who would use feet to measure length anyway?

    Well duh, all you have to do is go around to a few neighbourhood houses and chop a few off while everyone's sleeping. A bit of chloroform helps too. You just keep them in a fridge. =)

    At least, that's what I do...

     

    <<

     

    >>

     

  • OneMHz (cs) in reply to kuroshin
    kuroshin:
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    Daren printed out the Page_Load() method using a half-spaced six-point font with two "screens" per page. He highlighted the buggy and incorrect code, spliced the pages together, and went back to The Director's office. In a move that may not have been the wisest career choice, Daren held the first page in the air above his head and let the other taped-together pages cascade to the floor. With over seven-feet of highlighted code in hand, Daren said: "this is what's wrong with the code."

    Oh wait, did you say that only the Page_Load() method was seven feet long ? 

    *shudders* 

     It's simple refactoring to fix... Page_Load() calls LoadPage(), and LoadPage() is 7 feet of bad code.  All better.
     

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to Tuldas

    Anonymous:
    Seven feet of buggy code, not seven pages.

     so how many pages is that , assuming standard 'letter' sized paper (8.5x11).

  • Oob (unregistered) in reply to Anonymous
    Comment held for moderation.
  • rmr (cs)

    step 1: Get Fired.

    step 2: Twist the tale of your firing until it was your bosses legendary stupidity that resulted in your firing.

    step 3: Impress prospective employers with your tale.

    step 4: Get hired in a new job. 

    step 5: Profit.

  • bip (unregistered) in reply to Anonymous

    Not entirely sure if you were joking, I hope so... 

    With all the work-arounds and manual interventions listed, one could hardly say it was working...

     

     

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to Anonymous
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Anonymous (unregistered) in reply to shadowman
    shadowman:
    Anonymous:
    shadowman:

    Anonymous:
    Seven feet of buggy code, not seven pages.

    So actually 7.63 pages, using 8.5x11" paper.

    Unless you don't count the margins...

    He said it was printed 2 pages per sheet, so it was most likely printed 2 portrait shaped pages, side by side, lanscaped on the paper.  So, really 9.88 sheets...

    Well, lets assume 1" margins on all sides and 7 feet of actual code, so close to 13 pages, really.

    12 .. that last page is just the trailing whitespace :P 

  • Albert Pascual (unregistered)

    What happened to Daren?

  • Daren's Coworker (unregistered) in reply to rmr

    I worked with Daren at the time, and I assure you it is all true.  Every bit. I wish you guys could have seen the Visio mentioned in the story.  It is literally 14 manual steps that had to be performed each month.  And I saw the 7 foot long print out with my own eyes.  I was cracking up at the time.

     And Daren did not get fired... nor does he work there anymore.
     

  • JamesCurran (cs) in reply to Tel Janin

    Anonymous:
    He said it was printed 2 pages per sheet, so it was most likely printed 2 portrait shaped pages, side by side, lanscaped on the paper. 

    Actually, as a computer screen is wider than it is long, I'd assume that he'd put two of them, top-to-bottom, on a page printed portrait.

    I'd further assume that he was doing screen prints (ie, it was 'with two "screens" per page') taping them together, and highlighting parts, to visually demostrate how contorted & silly the report process was. 

  • gl (unregistered) in reply to unklegwar

    unklegwar:

    <snip>

    This is just like measuring distance in units of time: "How far is it to your house from here?" "Oh, about 20 minutes"

     

    You could always express the distance to your house in fractions of light-years. 

     186,000 miles per second, it's not just a good idea, it's the law!

  • Charlie (unregistered) in reply to mare

    Anonymous:
    Who would use feet to measure length anyway?


    Only an American or British, as every other country use SI units.  7 feet would be 2 meters or so.  Yes those two countries should convert to SI system, but why USA/UK would care of the rest of the World.  My 2 cents.

  • EvanED (cs) in reply to Anonymous
    Anonymous:
    shadowman:

    Well, lets assume 1" margins on all sides and 7 feet of actual code, so close to 13 pages, really.

    12 .. that last page is just the trailing whitespace :P 

    Well, to be honest, there's also the final curly brace on there.

     

    (I *know* I'm not the only one that happens to sometimes seemingly every single time I print code...)
     

  • jim (unregistered) in reply to Anon
    Comment held for moderation.
  • mdb0251 (unregistered) in reply to Anon

    Likewise, a company can take their clients to McDonald's and it will satisfy their hunger, but they shell out more money to go some place fancy. Something finely crafted will always be appreciated more than something that just gets the job done.

     
    Yes, but as my dad always said: "This is not the Olympics.  There are no points awarded for difficulty." 

  • Mikademus (cs)
    Alex Papadimoulis:

    In a move that may not have been the wisest career choice, Daren held the first page in the air above his head and let the other taped-together pages cascade to the floor. With over seven-feet of highlighted code in hand, Daren said: "this is what's wrong with the code."

    So he openly challenged the directors' judgement, technical know-how and budget spending. Of course a status-and-prestige-oriented personality would go for him after having ostensibly proved being a clear and present danger to his tenure.

  • jim (unregistered) in reply to gl
    Anonymous:

    unklegwar:

    <snip>

    This is just like measuring distance in units of time: "How far is it to your house from here?" "Oh, about 20 minutes"

     

    You could always express the distance to your house in fractions of light-years. 

     186,000 miles per second, it's not just a good idea, it's the law!

    Hmmm. I'd love to see speed signs of 6.7204301075268817204301075268817e-8 mph except in school zones when children are present. Then it's 2.986857825567502986857825567503e-8 mph.

    Man, my LS speedometer never moves off the left side! It must mean we need more power!

  • Anonymous (unregistered) in reply to Charlie
    Anonymous:

    Anonymous:
    Who would use feet to measure length anyway?


    Only an American or British, as every other country use SI units.  7 feet would be 2 meters or so.  Yes those two countries should convert to SI system, but why USA/UK would care of the rest of the World.  My 2 cents.

    Why should we convert? The imperial system came before SI! Sometimes, it is just better ot use an already existing (and functional) system rather than consuming resources (time, energy, money) developing a new system and then trying to convince everyone that yours is better. SI is no more a golden hammer than COBOL is. :P

    Plus, measuring temperature in centigrade is just plain dumb. 

  • Yes, I'm "Daren" (unregistered) in reply to Daren's Coworker

    Thanks J!  I appreciate the validation; I wouldn't believe this story either if someone had told me it.

    Alex did a good job anonymizing the story, but all the pertinent facts are as he described them.  And yes, Page_Load was indeed a couple thousand lines of spaghetti code. 

    One of the original authors of this was the same person who implemented a web service which accepted a serialized "object" as parameter.  His approach was to de-serialize the XML from the SOAP stream into a C# object, then reserialize it into XML with a different schema (I've no idea why), then access the "properties" through XPath queries, rather than just accessing the properties of the C# object.
     

     

  • jo42 (cs)

    Note to Daren S (for future reference :) :

    People don't like to be told they are stupid and forked up...

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