• Sad Bug Killer (cs)

    Trash comment Please remove

  • Hatshepsut (cs)

    You've never seen Australian currency before either, I take it?

    [BTW, How do blind people deal with US currency, other than the Ray Charles approach? ("Singles.")]

    Addendum (2008-09-26 09:20): Oh shit I just re-read this and it's one of those sniffy know-all posts that I really hate.

    Sorry all. I'll get me coat...

  • amischiefr (cs)

    You have to love any currency with the word Dong in it. "Here, take 10,000 Dongs and be happy with them!!!"

  • Hobson (cs)

    And whole that crapton of candies is not even in half as tasty as one crapgram of Polish candies.

  • gabba (cs)

    I can't really criticize Jere's Opera t-shirt offering, but he had a tough act to follow, what with the mountains of candy.

    Bearded dude == Ho Chi Minh, I'm guessing.

  • LightStyx (cs)

    Now I know where to send my crappy Magic Card commons!

  • Spud (unregistered)

    "I wanna take you to a gay bar!"

  • tchang (unregistered)

    the money comes from Vietname and yes the bearded dude is uncle Ho. With 173,000 VND you have approximatively 10.5 USD

  • th30519 (cs)

    I love that Alex has a wooden and faux-brick wall behind him. Presumably, the picture of the candy is on the infamous wooden table, but there's so much candy you can't see it.

    Note from Alex: Real brick! We're in a historic building (circa 1860) and have fun features like that.

  • ThomsonsPier (cs)

    Aha! Now we know what you look like!

    Is that a metric or imperial crapton?

  • KenW (cs) in reply to tchang
    tchang:
    the money comes from Vietname

    Did you figure that out from the fact that every single bill has the word "Viet Nam" on it in plain view?

    I would have thought you could at least look at it long enough to get the spelling right, but I guess not.

  • MRAB (unregistered) in reply to ThomsonsPier

    Imperial is "crapton", metric is "craptonne".

    Anyway, I'm assuming it's a short crapton (US), not a long crapton (UK).

  • tchang (unregistered) in reply to KenW
    KenW:
    tchang:
    the money comes from Vietname

    Did you figure that out from the fact that every single bill has the word "Viet Nam" on it in plain view?

    I would have thought you could at least look at it long enough to get the spelling right, but I guess not.

    Actually I didn't have a close look to the bills. Viêt Nam is actually spelled in one word in french and I'm use to write it like this (with no ending e I agree, but I only noticed the mistake after posting my comment).

    Anyway, that still makes two valuables information out of three...

  • jimmySixNuts (unregistered)

    you can buy that radioactive warning tape on the internet, how cool is that? as soon as my order arrives i'm going on a spree, people around town will be terrified

  • Joe (unregistered) in reply to amischiefr
    amischiefr:
    You have to love any currency with the word Dong in it. "Here, take 10,000 Dongs and be happy with them!!!"

    But it's even better! For a little over 60 USD, you can be a Vietnamese millionaire, which gives you the right to say "Yes, I have a mega-dong!"

    Unfortunately, it doesn't look like there's that much there, and "kilo-dong" just doesn't have the appeal...

  • dev3 (cs)

    How many people actually downloaded that Zipp file, and found it funny??

  • Zecc (cs)

    So Aspose read the TDWTF and still are willing to sponsor it?

  • Yanman.be (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • DoctorFriday (cs)
    Alex:
    As for the USB drive, it's a whopping 16MB

    I wonder if Vista could use something that small for Speed Boost

  • Yep (unregistered)

    Holy crap!

    Did Mark Cottman-Fields really send you an MTG card? Maan, must resist urge to quit my job and go play card games.

  • Tephlon (unregistered) in reply to amischiefr
    amischiefr :
    You have to love any currency with the word Dong in it. "Here, take 10,000 Dongs and be happy with them!!!"

    Didn't Oprah fall for that one?

  • Meh (unregistered) in reply to Tephlon
    Tephlon:
    amischiefr :
    You have to love any currency with the word Dong in it. "Here, take 10,000 Dongs and be happy with them!!!"

    Didn't Oprah fall for that one?

    Over 9000 dongs: 9001 dongs. Trolling Oprah on national television: Priceless.

  • DaveAronson (cs)

    If the thin mousepads have the usual grippy rubber backing, they could still be useful as jar openers....

  • TopCod3r (cs) in reply to DoctorFriday
    DoctorFriday:
    Alex:
    As for the USB drive, it's a whopping 16MB

    I wonder if Vista could use something that small for Speed Boost

    Sure, why not? After all Speed Boost (Ready Boost) operates on the principle of the placebo effect, right?

    I thank Microsoft for that. One of the tricks I use when some of my software is running slow is to hand out a really cheap USB stick to the user and tell him or her to plug it into their computer and that it boosts performance of my application by up to 20%. It works especially well on salespeople and executives.

    I keep a jar of USB drives on my desk in case this happens. I just counted and I have 12 of them in my jar right now. I bought 20 of them from MicroCenter last month, so that tells you how useful they are... at $5 a pop (I expense them).

  • WhiskeyJack (cs)

    Tim Horton's! Canadian Tire Money!

    The stuff of my day-to-day grind. I bet every Canadian reader of TDWTF has at least 50 cents worth of Canadian Tire money in their wallet.

  • Paul (unregistered) in reply to th30519
    th30519:
    Note from Alex: Real brick! We're in a historic building (circa 1860) and have fun features like that.

    Is 1860 'historic' now???? Where I live (in rural England), any building newer than about 1860 is 'modern'... However, we can afford plaster! :) (Anyway, who has bricks, 2 foot thick solid stone walls FTW!)

  • operagost (cs) in reply to KenW
    KenW:
    tchang:
    the money comes from Vietname

    Did you figure that out from the fact that every single bill has the word "Viet Nam" on it in plain view?

    I would have thought you could at least look at it long enough to get the spelling right, but I guess not.

    Should be "Uncle Chi" too (Ho was his [assumed] family name).

  • tmountjr (cs)

    I will buy you lunch if you walk all the way to my neck of the woods in Upstate SC. Great place to be...unless you've just walked off a crapton of candy.

  • operagost (cs) in reply to DoctorFriday
    DoctorFriday:
    Alex:
    As for the USB drive, it's a whopping 16MB

    I wonder if Vista could use something that small for Speed Boost

    No, they have to meet certain specifications, and I guarantee that an ancient 16 MB flash drive precedes those specs.

  • MrsPost (cs)

    OK - the analyis of the the 'crapton' just made my day. The map with the route to walk off the calories was the crowning touch.

    My hat is off to you, sir.

  • Craig F (unregistered)

    Where did the Canadian get those D&D cards...? I need some..:)

  • Spectre (cs)

    Aha!

    (Wooden-tables the pic of Alex, and hangs it on the wall.)

  • Harrow (unregistered) in reply to operagost
    operagost:
    Should be "Uncle Chi" too (Ho was his [assumed] family name).
    He is still referred to as "Uncle Hồ" in Vietnam.

    -Harrow.

  • Osno (unregistered) in reply to TopCod3r
    TopCod3r:
    DoctorFriday:
    Alex:
    As for the USB drive, it's a whopping 16MB

    I wonder if Vista could use something that small for Speed Boost

    Sure, why not? After all Speed Boost (Ready Boost) operates on the principle of the placebo effect, right?

    I thank Microsoft for that. One of the tricks I use when some of my software is running slow is to hand out a really cheap USB stick to the user and tell him or her to plug it into their computer and that it boosts performance of my application by up to 20%. It works especially well on salespeople and executives.

    I keep a jar of USB drives on my desk in case this happens. I just counted and I have 12 of them in my jar right now. I bought 20 of them from MicroCenter last month, so that tells you how useful they are... at $5 a pop (I expense them).

    So ud is running slow these days?

  • Matt J (unregistered) in reply to Paul
    Paul:
    th30519:
    Note from Alex: Real brick! We're in a historic building (circa 1860) and have fun features like that.

    Is 1860 'historic' now???? Where I live (in rural England), any building newer than about 1860 is 'modern'... However, we can afford plaster! :) (Anyway, who has bricks, 2 foot thick solid stone walls FTW!)

    Those poor Americans have very few old buildings. It probably doesn't help that they have a fondness for using wood for the main structure of their buildings. In my village, there are probably several buildings older than 99.99% of all buildings in the USA.
  • snoofle (cs)

    Alex,

    According to my wife, calories don't count if you eat junk food while under stress, so unless your life is uber-calm, you should be ok ;)

  • Daniel (unregistered)

    I've seen circular things about the same width and seemingly of the same material as those cheap mouse pads being given out during career fairs, marketed as "jar openers, coasters... all sorts of things!" Just because it doesn't work as a mouse pad doesn't mean you can't figure something out with it.

  • Code Dependent (cs) in reply to Matt J
    Matt J:
    Paul:
    th30519:
    Note from Alex: Real brick! We're in a historic building (circa 1860) and have fun features like that.
    Is 1860 'historic' now???? Where I live (in rural England), any building newer than about 1860 is 'modern'... However, we can afford plaster! :) (Anyway, who has bricks, 2 foot thick solid stone walls FTW!)
    Those poor Americans have very few old buildings. It probably doesn't help that they have a fondness for using wood for the main structure of their buildings. In my village, there are probably several buildings older than 99.99% of all buildings in the USA.
    Original native American housing was mostly knock-down, portable. It wasn't until some of your forebears realized there was a better place to live that we got permanent structures here. It doesn't take a math whiz to know who would have the older buildings and why. Obviously, since you've figured it out.
  • sf (unregistered)

    What's with Hồ Chí Minh's non-symmetrical beard? It's offset to the right side of his face. Did he trim it himself in the car on the way to the engraver?

  • Hydragyrum (unregistered) in reply to WhiskeyJack

    I got 80 cents in mine!

    Can't say I'm as enthusiastic for Tim Horton's as most English Canadians though...

  • garlicknitter (unregistered) in reply to Matt J
    Matt J:
    Paul:
    th30519:
    Note from Alex: Real brick! We're in a historic building (circa 1860) and have fun features like that.

    Is 1860 'historic' now???? Where I live (in rural England), any building newer than about 1860 is 'modern'... However, we can afford plaster! :) (Anyway, who has bricks, 2 foot thick solid stone walls FTW!)

    Those poor Americans have very few old buildings. It probably doesn't help that they have a fondness for using wood for the main structure of their buildings. In my village, there are probably several buildings older than 99.99% of all buildings in the USA.

    The difference between the British and Americans: To an American, 100 years is a long time. To a British person, 100 miles is a long distance.

  • Matt J (unregistered) in reply to garlicknitter
    garlicknitter:
    Matt J:
    Paul:
    th30519:
    Note from Alex: Real brick! We're in a historic building (circa 1860) and have fun features like that.

    Is 1860 'historic' now???? Where I live (in rural England), any building newer than about 1860 is 'modern'... However, we can afford plaster! :) (Anyway, who has bricks, 2 foot thick solid stone walls FTW!)

    Those poor Americans have very few old buildings. It probably doesn't help that they have a fondness for using wood for the main structure of their buildings. In my village, there are probably several buildings older than 99.99% of all buildings in the USA.

    The difference between the British and Americans: To an American, 100 years is a long time. To a British person, 100 miles is a long distance.

    Entirely true! The other thing about us, we talk about the weather more than anyone else, but we don't have any of it. We get 4 cm of snow and the entire country grinds to a halt.

    Code Dependent:
    Original native American housing was mostly knock-down, portable. It wasn't until some of your forebears realized there was a better place to live that we got permanent structures here. It doesn't take a math whiz to know who would have the older buildings and why. Obviously, since you've figured it out.

    Why the snideness? Do you make a habit of casually insulting people?

  • moshbox (unregistered) in reply to WhiskeyJack
    WhiskeyJack:
    Tim Horton's! Canadian Tire Money!

    The stuff of my day-to-day grind. I bet every Canadian reader of TDWTF has at least 50 cents worth of Canadian Tire money in their wallet.

    I cleaned out my truck last month and wound up with a brick sized wad of stuff. Naturally I headed straight to Crappy Tire for some big ticket item I really didn't need. After watching the poor girl spend 15 minutes sorting and counting it, I got a whopping $5 knocked off. Seemed kinda pointless in the end.

  • Mike (unregistered) in reply to Matt J

    [quote user="Matt J"] The difference between the British and Americans: To an American, 100 years is a long time. To a British person, 100 miles is a long distance.[/quote] Entirely true! The other thing about us, we talk about the weather more than anyone else, but we don't have any of it. We get 4 cm of snow and the entire country grinds to a halt. [/quote]

    It is always interesting watching European countries shut down under a hit of snow when we sit here under feet of it at times in Michigan.

    On the other hand Michiganders seems to run for the hills (or more likely the storm shelters I hope...) when a tornado watch shows up and the Florida people are laughing at us...

  • Mike (unregistered) in reply to Mike

    <blink> The automatically added quote code doesn't work? Weird.

    (Unless I'm just being dyslexic today)

  • Code Dependent (cs) in reply to Mike
    Mike:
    <blink> The automatically added quote code doesn't work? Weird.

    (Unless I'm just being dyslexic today)

    You left two closing quote tags to one opening. The "Preview" button is handy for spotting stuff like that.

  • Someone You Know (cs) in reply to Mike
    Mike:
    <blink> The automatically added quote code doesn't work? Weird.

    (Unless I'm just being dyslexic today)

    An unmatched closing quote tag causes the whole quote tree of a post to fall apart, it seems.

  • Sutherlands (unregistered) in reply to Craig F
    Craig F:
    Where did the Canadian get those D&D cards...? I need some..:)
    Indeed. PAUL! Give us teh codez!
  • Matt J (unregistered) in reply to Mike
    Mike:
    Matt J:
    The difference between the British and Americans: To an American, 100 years is a long time. To a British person, 100 miles is a long distance. Entirely true! The other thing about us, we talk about the weather more than anyone else, but we don't have any of it. We get 4 cm of snow and the entire country grinds to a halt.

    It is always interesting watching European countries shut down under a hit of snow when we sit here under feet of it at times in Michigan.

    On the other hand Michiganders seems to run for the hills (or more likely the storm shelters I hope...) when a tornado watch shows up and the Florida people are laughing at us...

    It's mainly England that has the issues. We don't get snow with any regularity, unlike the alpine countries. Even Scotland handles it better than us.

  • Code Dependent (cs) in reply to Matt J
    Matt J:
    Why the snideness? Do you make a habit of casually insulting people?
    "Poor" Americans? There is in your choice of adjective the implication of superiority on your part. While I'm impressed by old or ancient buildings, especially if they're still in practical everyday use, I'm not clear on why having fewer makes us "poor". As for building with wood, houses of wood were built in areas where wood was plentiful. In areas with different resources, those resources were used. The main advantage I can see in living in an old house of stone is that you get to admire the electrical and plumbing fixtures that were bolted to the wall at some later time, rather than being hidden inside the wall as with wood.

    I don't casually insult people, no; but I do occasionally return like for like.

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