• GiantPanda (unregistered) in reply to smxlong
    Bob:
    What happens to you if you break this rule? Say you just don't show up for work. Do you go to jail? Do you get your ass sued off?

    Most likely it will show up in the letter of reference. Employers want to see these for all your previous jobs (at least a few years back) as part of a job application (together with the CV). Makes them much less likely to hire you in the future.

    You also might (probably not, but...) get sued for damages.

  • The real deal (unregistered) in reply to Lysis

    Whining crap like this makes me want to go and offshore more work....I'm sick of whining technical staff....either do the work your paid to do; (and get it done right the first time, not after 3 re-works) or find someplace else you "like" to work...

    In 6 months, you'll be bored there, too.

    Get ready, India, China....here it comes.

  • JimM (unregistered) in reply to GiantPanda

    [quote user="GiantPandaMost likely it will show up in the letter of reference.[/quote] Depends on the employment law of the country. UK law keeps getting stricter and stricter over what you can and can't say in references now (you are only allowed to make factual statements, so you can't say "doesn't turn up on time", you have to say "had 10 late arrivals in the last 6 months") and even then there are risks that former employees will complain about the reference. A lot of companies now only give references that say "I confirm that JimM worked here between May 2006 and July 2007 as a Technical Project Officer" (seriously, I had one of those, fortunately to a very understanding employer who showed me it and suggested I might not want to use that company as a reference anymore). The most damaging thing a former employer could do is probably to refuse to give a reference. No future employer is going to take that well... ;^)

  • NeoMojo (unregistered)

    My Particular contract made me double take: I have to give one month's notice, but I must not go to the office during my notice period. Sounds to me like a free month's holiday.

  • (cs) in reply to EPE
    EPE:
    Technical Recruiter:
    European Companies often don't have to worry about a 2 week notice. Legally, most European nations have legislation that are biased towards companies. This gives the Employer protection. The Employees must give a notice much longer than 2 weeks..It is usually tied to the Tenure of the Employee. The longer they have been with the company, the greater the notice you must give...in most cases you are talking months!

    So the companies are less likely to write those types of NDA's etc because of the laws already in place.

    Can you imagine having to give a 4 month notice at your present employer...and then HAVE TO WORK THERE FOR THE NEXT 4 MONTHS!!

    I do not know where in Europe you live, but here in Spain things are quite different. Both the employee and the employer must give a two week notice. When someone is fired, it is common practice to leave the office immediately, but he will be paid for the remaining two weeks.
    The UK legal minimum is one week if you have worked between one month and 2 years. After two years one week notice for each year of employment, with a maximum of 12 weeks notice. Unless the contract says otherwise. For example if you have been at the company for 14 years and you want a 12 week notice period the employer has to give it to you and vice versa.

    It is standard to have a 1 month notice period after completing the first three months of employment, though if you sign a contract that differs then you are expected in the eyes of the law to honour your contract, as long as the contract does not violate your rights (e.g. less than the legal minimum working period)

    It is also standard when leaving you either take any remaining paid holiday (e.g. if you have 2 weeks paid leave, and 4 week notice period, you will work 2 weeks but be paid the 4), or you work your notice period and are reimbursed any remaining days (in this case you will be paid 6 weeks of pay). How you take your paid holiday all depends on your contract (most contracts specify a 4 week’ notice period for a 1-2 weeks of, and 3month for 3+ weeks, with one week notice for a couple of days). It is expected that management / HR management will specify how this goes when you hand in your notice. (i.e you formally hand your notice in by writing, and a representative of the company will reply with the actual end date, holiday due etc)

    In the case of being fired you will leave immediately, unless for gross misconduct you will normally be paid your notice. Redundancy depends on the company and its charter. Most medium sized businesses will pay you to the end of the month, and then pay you your notice period + any remaining paid holiday. Larger companies will often have various redundancy schemes in place (A friend managed to walk out with almost an entire years salary from taking up voluntary redundancy at Cable & Wireless.) In large companies, it often depends on how powerful the union is.

    A ‘mean’ company will make you redundant, make you work your notice period and take any remaining holiday.

    If you are a contractor, then it all depends on your contract. For tax reasons you want the contract to be based on your company supplying services for a specified order of works. Contracts that treat you like an employee / temporary employee are bad as you get caught under some legislation called IR35 which means you can’t take all the tax breaks you can for being a company director, such as paying yourself dividends at a lower rate of tax, claiming all manner of expenses etc, But you do get employment

  • s. (unregistered) in reply to Mark B
    I've actually been made redundant and then contracted out but the same company on the same job after my notice.

    I had bothered I could have taken them to an employment thingie but it just wasn't worth it.

    Let me guess, the contractor work paid better?

  • Hognoxious (unregistered) in reply to ParkinT
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Hognoxious (unregistered) in reply to A Gould
    A Gould:
    What I found amusing is that the boss assumes he'll be working as a consultant after his departure.
    I don't think that's what it means, it means it's cheaper to employ him than it would be to get a consultant in to do the same job.

    But the phrasing is such a WTF it's difficult to be sure.

  • (cs) in reply to Jay
    Jay:
    I once saw a classified ad for a small computer that, along with how much RAM and disk space and so forth, said this computer had "65 CO2 chips".

    Obviously they were using dry ice for cooling...

  • shana (unregistered) in reply to Ken B
    "You can't quit, you're fired! Starting in three weeks."

    Stupidly enough, I've had this happen to me, back in '98 when I was doing a Kiosk app for a certain world expo that year. The company I worked for had all 11 of us, project manager included, cooped up in a little square room with no windows, and even before I got sent to "the room" there were jokes flying around that they would have to start putting up shelf space for the second layer of programmers (since all the "ground floor space" was full already :p).

    Needless to say, tension was high, productivity was low, i.e., we spent most of our days trying to talk ourselves into working and ended up mostly playing racing games. Of course, when the expo opening date came up, the software was about as ready as it would ever be (hey, it worked, it didn't crash, it was actually very qa'd), so the company started looking into dumping some extra baggage it had accumulated during it.

    Since I had said "no" to the dev director when he had asked me to do a tiny little adjustment to the application so that an event could happen on multiple venues, this request of his coming a full day before the expo opening, I was included on the bunch of people who had become redundant.

    I mean, imagine the dev director and his boss coming over to my little corner of the room, smiling. Gave me chills just looking at them heading my way. Then, very nicely and smiley, a day before the launch, the dev director's boss tells me they need a change in the application. Something simple like changing a one-to-one into a one-to-many relationship in the database.

    This was after I'd told the project manager exactly how and why I wouldn't do it, since I had specifically requested a meeting 4 months prior to this to decide how events were tied to venues, and made sure everyone was aware of the implications of deciding to do one to one vs one to many. Anyone familiar with databases will know just how far-reaching the consequences are when you choose one type of relationship over another, not only in terms of the model and queries, but also the entire GUI, backends, ble bla.

    They must have thought that by getting two directors to talk to me, I would quit being stubborn or something. I remember saying a rather clear "NO", but people tell me they heard it all the way down the corridor, so I guess I was a little stressed out ;)

    At this point I was having a breakdown and seriously considering quitting, but then I got summoned to a meeting with the dev director, where he politely goes more or less like this:

    him: "Well, you know, we've noticed that you've been very tired lately, and you're not doing all that well."

    me: "Yes, I've been feeling that, this work has become very frustrating."

    him: "Yes, we don't think you fit the team right anymore, so we've decided to let you go."

    me: "Really? Interesting, I was going to say I can't do this anymore so I'm quitting, glad we see things the same way. Since the software is done, there's no need for me to be here anymore, so I'll just pass things over to whoever you want and I'll be off at the end of this week."

    him: "Well, but we still need you"

    me: "You do...?"

    him: "So we're firing you, but that's only effective 3 months from now"

    me: "3 months from now..."

    him: "Because, as you know, you're the only one who fully knows the database and the queries and how the backend software works, and the expo is going to last for 3 months, so we really need to be here to support that. No one else can do your work because they are all being sent to new projects"

    me: "right..."

    him: "Glad we could have this chat."

    It should be said that I did not have a contract with them, they worked with everyone through green receipts (supposedly so they could avoid half the taxes and fire anyone they wanted at any point - this type of work doesn't impose firing conditions to either party :p)

    It should also be said that everyone that became "redundant" didn't get the bonus that was promised at the beginning of the project for anyone who would be willing to join it (yes, it came to that, the dev director having to beg people to join the team, such was this project's reputation)

    That same day (thursday) I scheduled a job interview for the next day, the next Monday I was working on a new job. Months later when I visited my old pals (who were still in "the room"), they told me I should be discreet and not let myself be seen by the director. Apparently, he spent a lot of time going through the corridors cursing my name, the poor fellow.

  • (cs) in reply to Ryan
    Ryan:
    WhiskeyJack:

    Seems they'd "forgotten" to tell me to come in to pick up my final pay.

    Why did they have to tell you that you were owed money? If you knew you worked the week, didn't you know you were supposed to get paid?

    I don't know if this is just a Canadian thing, but most companies here pay on direct deposit, yet insist on cutting a cheque for final payments. I have no idea why.

    If O.P. had received a graduate student grant, he may have had a largish balance, and not noticed that the final pay hadn't been deposited.

  • (cs) in reply to ChiefCrazyTalk
    ChiefCrazyTalk:
    unholyguy:
    This is also not true in California http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_Vacation.htm <snip>

    Companies have found a way around that as well, however - if the PTO is not accrued weekly but rather granted all at once, they are not responsible for having to pay you "unused" time when you leave.

    In Ontario, it is mandated by law that you accumulate vacation earnings at a rate of 4%. For waged employees, this is typically banked and paid when the time off actually occurs. For salaried employees, it's typically given as 2 weeks vacation.

    This money is considered to be part of the wage, and held in trust. (In the event of bankruptcy, it would have the same status as unpaid wages, but not as high as tax withheld but not paid to the government.)

    I suppose they could dick around with senior employees getting 5 weeks, and only paying them the mandated 2, but there is a strict 4% rule to fall back on.

  • gisTimmy (unregistered) in reply to Lars Vargas
    Lars Vargas:
    That first ad was text messaged from a bathroom. They were apparently in the middle of a vowel movement and got carried away.

    "Vowel movement"... :)

  • (cs)

    Another reason for companies to escort you out immediately is that you don't stick around bad-mouthing everyone and everything and ruining company morale. Also, there is a chance you talk other employees into quitting.

  • Exick (unregistered)

    I'm calling BS on the newspaper ad. Either that or the person in charge of classifieds should be fired. Typically, newspapers have a list of approved abbreviations for ads that are charged per line (like classifieds are) because otherwise every job listing in the paper would look like this wtf.

  • (cs) in reply to abitslow
    abitslow:
    Yes well if I was looking for a government to look after me, i wouldn't choose the us.
    I forceyou to choose the "us." I force you!

    Yes, well, what was your point again?

  • (cs) in reply to s.
    s.:
    smxlong:
    In those countries/locales where you are "required" to give X amount of notice before quitting, I have a question: What happens to you if you break this rule? Say you just don't show up for work. Do you go to jail? Do you get your ass sued off?

    Sounds pretty psychotic to me.

    You may get your ass sued off (up to the resulting damage) if your not showing up caused any damage (say, they needed to recall someone from vacation, it costs lots here - the person gets ALL of the interrupted vacation period back).

    If your not showing to work without notice caused death or injury, you may go to jail.

    It's not psychotic, it's about civil responsibility.

    Also, you lose all leaving benefits like getting paid for all remaining vacation, 2 extra days of vacation just for seeking new job, right to unemployment, salary for the notice period etc.

    Would you, by any chance, have pointy hair?

    And have you bathed in the blood of the Lamb?

    Just asking.

    (Incidentally, that would be "civic" responsibility, not "civil." Best to get your legal terms right, really.)

  • red (unregistered) in reply to Thief^
    Thief^:
    JimM:
    On the other hand, the adverts that amuse me in the Uk are the ones that ask for Experience of "Apache, php, perl, ASP, VB, C#, .NET, MySQL, SQL, Oracle, IIS, Linux..." - it's highly unlikely that any job is ever going to want all of those skills, and if they do it suggests the managers are too incompetent to choose a single architecture to work with and you don't want to wrok there anyway!
    This could be because of some UK law that means that they have to place an advert even if they want someone's relative to take the job. So they place an advert so specific that only one person fits... (guess who)

    Or maybe the more common tought that HR writes the advert. And when IT needs someone they just ask what tools do you use. In most cases HR doesn't have a clue what IT needs, so they name all tools, languages that are used.

  • Josh (unregistered)

    I've seen ads like that in the paper. The one that sticks in my mind was WTFy because they wanted CV/resumes mailed to them. I've even heard a radio ad for a employment agency that makes fun of "nd rpt ft bl"-type newspaper ads like this.

    CAPTCHA: praesent

  • (david) (unregistered) in reply to mightybaldking
    mightybaldking:
    Ryan:
    WhiskeyJack:

    Seems they'd "forgotten" to tell me to come in to pick up my final pay.

    Why did they have to tell you that you were owed money? If you knew you worked the week, didn't you know you were supposed to get paid?

    I don't know if this is just a Canadian thing, but most companies here pay on direct deposit, yet insist on cutting a cheque for final payments. I have no idea why.

    Because after they delete your employee record and network access, they no longer have your address?

    I once had money with a bank that couldn't handle account closures...

  • (cs) in reply to ObiWayneKenobi

    Atalcluy, you can cnhgae cretcahas oerdr, epcext for the emxetre oens, and polpee wlil raed it jsut fnie.

  • (cs) in reply to charlieman
    charlieman:
    Atalcluy, you can cnhgae cretcahas oerdr, epcext for the emxetre oens, and polpee wlil raed it jsut fnie.
    Sorry. Could you repeat that?
  • (cs) in reply to af31
    af31:
    Last job I found a new job, and not only gave 2 weeks notice, but helpfully added a list of the projects I currently had open. I pointed out that as the only person in my department, it was not possible to complete all the projectsin two weeks, but if they would let me know the priority of each, I'd gladly do my best to get as much wrapped up as possible before my last day.

    A week and a half pass. Then the VP Marketoid, right handof the CEO stops by to talk to me about the projects. I say sure, which ones are critical to finish? He gives me a smarmy smile and says, "All of them."

    I laughed in his face. Not out of spite but genuine shock and amusement. Still laughing, I told him no, it wasn't going to happen. My new position was in another state, I still was in the process of moving, and was not planning on working overtime simply because he waited too long to get back to me. He left and didn't speak to me for the remaining 3 days.

    The last day a guy showed up to work in the department - he had been let go shortly before I started, and apparently they rehired him to take over. I spent the day trying to show him where everything was, what was in progress, etc. and he barely paid attention. Annoying and odd, but in 8 hours it wasn't my problem. At the end of the day I said, "Well, good luck. Here is a list of where all the files are." He blinked and clearly didn't understand. Then I got it. I asked, "They...did tell you this is my last day...right?" No. No they didn't. He looked like a deer in the headlights.

    I laughed all the way to my car.

    For some reason, this is one of the funniest comments I've ever read on this site!

  • (cs) in reply to inventoryboy
    inventoryboy:
    .... He came back a few minutes after meeting with the company president and replied "We've accepted your resignation." I wanted to say "I'm so honored!!!!!" but I bit my lip.

    WHY? Were you afraid they may fire you?

  • I M PZZLD (unregistered)

    In response to the confusing advert:

    O RLY?

  • Paolo G (unregistered) in reply to Harry
    Harry:
    In the US in most states you can be fired at any time with no reason (unless you are in a group protected by discrimination laws)

    WTF? So are you saying that an employer can fire someone who is (say) white with no reason, but needs a reason to fire someone who is black? Now, that's discrimination.

    In the UK (and in other European countries) anti-discrimination laws protect all groups, not just the groups that are most subject to discrimination. So, anti-racism laws protect white people too, anti-sexism laws protect men too, etc.

    CAPTCHA: eros - yes, spread some love...

  • macson_g (unregistered)

    His lucky enough. Here, in Poland, we have 1 month notice, and if you work for your current employer more than three years, you have 3 months notice!

  • jhyu (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Zinder (unregistered) in reply to themagni

    This is very standard legal language. It is indicating that a remedy at law (that is, financial damages) would be insufficient, and you are more-or-less agreeing that a remedy at equity (such as an injunction to prevent you from operating a business/accepting a position that would use your NDA-ed knowledge to harm the company).

    Read up on the history of Courts of Equity vs Courts of Law.

  • Sanjana (unregistered) in reply to Grovesy
    Grovesy:
    EPE:
    Technical Recruiter:
    European Companies often don't have to worry about a 2 week notice. Legally, most European nations have legislation that are biased towards companies. This gives the Employer protection. The Employees must give a notice much longer than 2 weeks..It is usually tied to the Tenure of the Employee. The longer they have been with the company, the greater the notice you must give...in most cases you are talking months!

    So the companies are less likely to write those types of NDA's etc because of the laws already in place.

    Can you imagine having to give a 4 month notice at your present employer...and then HAVE TO WORK THERE FOR THE NEXT 4 MONTHS!!

    I do not know where in Europe you live, but here in Spain things are quite different. Both the employee and the employer must give a two week notice. When someone is fired, it is common practice to leave the office immediately, but he will be paid for the remaining two weeks.
    The UK legal minimum is one week if you have worked between one month and 2 years. After two years one week notice for each year of employment, with a maximum of 12 weeks notice. Unless the contract says otherwise. For example if you have been at the company for 14 years and you want a 12 week notice period the employer has to give it to you and vice versa.

    It is standard to have a 1 month notice period after completing the first three months of employment, though if you sign a contract that differs then you are expected in the eyes of the law to honour your contract, as long as the contract does not violate your rights (e.g. less than the legal minimum working period)

    It is also standard when leaving you either take any remaining paid holiday (e.g. if you have 2 weeks paid leave, and 4 week notice period, you will work 2 weeks but be paid the 4), or you work your notice period and are reimbursed any remaining days (in this case you will be paid 6 weeks of pay). How you take your paid holiday all depends on your contract (most contracts specify a 4 week’ notice period for a 1-2 weeks of, and 3month for 3+ weeks, with one week notice for a couple of days). It is expected that management / HR management will specify how this goes when you hand in your notice. (i.e you formally hand your notice in by writing, and a representative of the company will reply with the actual end date, holiday due etc)

    In the case of being fired you will leave immediately, unless for gross misconduct you will normally be paid your notice. Redundancy depends on the company and its charter. Most medium sized businesses will pay you to the end of the month, and then pay you your notice period + any remaining paid holiday. Larger companies will often have various redundancy schemes in place (A friend managed to walk out with almost an entire years salary from taking up voluntary redundancy at Cable & Wireless.) In large companies, it often depends on how powerful the union is.

    A ‘mean’ company will make you redundant, make you work your notice period and take any remaining holiday.

    If you are a contractor, then it all depends on your contract. For tax reasons you want the contract to be based on your company supplying services for a specified order of works. Contracts that treat you like an employee / temporary employee are bad as you get caught under some legislation called IR35 which means you can’t take all the tax breaks you can for being a company director, such as paying yourself dividends at a lower rate of tax, claiming all manner of expenses etc, But you do get employment

  • Sanjana (unregistered) in reply to Grovesy
    Grovesy:
    EPE:
    Technical Recruiter:
    European Companies often don't have to worry about a 2 week notice. Legally, most European nations have legislation that are biased towards companies. This gives the Employer protection. The Employees must give a notice much longer than 2 weeks..It is usually tied to the Tenure of the Employee. The longer they have been with the company, the greater the notice you must give...in most cases you are talking months!

    So the companies are less likely to write those types of NDA's etc because of the laws already in place.

    Can you imagine having to give a 4 month notice at your present employer...and then HAVE TO WORK THERE FOR THE NEXT 4 MONTHS!!

    I do not know where in Europe you live, but here in Spain things are quite different. Both the employee and the employer must give a two week notice. When someone is fired, it is common practice to leave the office immediately, but he will be paid for the remaining two weeks.
    The UK legal minimum is one week if you have worked between one month and 2 years. After two years one week notice for each year of employment, with a maximum of 12 weeks notice. Unless the contract says otherwise. For example if you have been at the company for 14 years and you want a 12 week notice period the employer has to give it to you and vice versa.

    It is standard to have a 1 month notice period after completing the first three months of employment, though if you sign a contract that differs then you are expected in the eyes of the law to honour your contract, as long as the contract does not violate your rights (e.g. less than the legal minimum working period)

    It is also standard when leaving you either take any remaining paid holiday (e.g. if you have 2 weeks paid leave, and 4 week notice period, you will work 2 weeks but be paid the 4), or you work your notice period and are reimbursed any remaining days (in this case you will be paid 6 weeks of pay). How you take your paid holiday all depends on your contract (most contracts specify a 4 week’ notice period for a 1-2 weeks of, and 3month for 3+ weeks, with one week notice for a couple of days). It is expected that management / HR management will specify how this goes when you hand in your notice. (i.e you formally hand your notice in by writing, and a representative of the company will reply with the actual end date, holiday due etc)

    In the case of being fired you will leave immediately, unless for gross misconduct you will normally be paid your notice. Redundancy depends on the company and its charter. Most medium sized businesses will pay you to the end of the month, and then pay you your notice period + any remaining paid holiday. Larger companies will often have various redundancy schemes in place (A friend managed to walk out with almost an entire years salary from taking up voluntary redundancy at Cable & Wireless.) In large companies, it often depends on how powerful the union is.

    A ‘mean’ company will make you redundant, make you work your notice period and take any remaining holiday.

    If you are a contractor, then it all depends on your contract. For tax reasons you want the contract to be based on your company supplying services for a specified order of works. Contracts that treat you like an employee / temporary employee are bad as you get caught under some legislation called IR35 which means you can’t take all the tax breaks you can for being a company director, such as paying yourself dividends at a lower rate of tax, claiming all manner of expenses etc, But you do get employment

  • Sanjana (unregistered) in reply to Grovesy
    Grovesy:
    EPE:
    Technical Recruiter:
    European Companies often don't have to worry about a 2 week notice. Legally, most European nations have legislation that are biased towards companies. This gives the Employer protection. The Employees must give a notice much longer than 2 weeks..It is usually tied to the Tenure of the Employee. The longer they have been with the company, the greater the notice you must give...in most cases you are talking months!

    So the companies are less likely to write those types of NDA's etc because of the laws already in place.

    Can you imagine having to give a 4 month notice at your present employer...and then HAVE TO WORK THERE FOR THE NEXT 4 MONTHS!!

    I do not know where in Europe you live, but here in Spain things are quite different. Both the employee and the employer must give a two week notice. When someone is fired, it is common practice to leave the office immediately, but he will be paid for the remaining two weeks.
    The UK legal minimum is one week if you have worked between one month and 2 years. After two years one week notice for each year of employment, with a maximum of 12 weeks notice. Unless the contract says otherwise. For example if you have been at the company for 14 years and you want a 12 week notice period the employer has to give it to you and vice versa.

    It is standard to have a 1 month notice period after completing the first three months of employment, though if you sign a contract that differs then you are expected in the eyes of the law to honour your contract, as long as the contract does not violate your rights (e.g. less than the legal minimum working period)

    It is also standard when leaving you either take any remaining paid holiday (e.g. if you have 2 weeks paid leave, and 4 week notice period, you will work 2 weeks but be paid the 4), or you work your notice period and are reimbursed any remaining days (in this case you will be paid 6 weeks of pay). How you take your paid holiday all depends on your contract (most contracts specify a 4 week’ notice period for a 1-2 weeks of, and 3month for 3+ weeks, with one week notice for a couple of days). It is expected that management / HR management will specify how this goes when you hand in your notice. (i.e you formally hand your notice in by writing, and a representative of the company will reply with the actual end date, holiday due etc)

    In the case of being fired you will leave immediately, unless for gross misconduct you will normally be paid your notice. Redundancy depends on the company and its charter. Most medium sized businesses will pay you to the end of the month, and then pay you your notice period + any remaining paid holiday. Larger companies will often have various redundancy schemes in place (A friend managed to walk out with almost an entire years salary from taking up voluntary redundancy at Cable & Wireless.) In large companies, it often depends on how powerful the union is.

    A ‘mean’ company will make you redundant, make you work your notice period and take any remaining holiday.

    If you are a contractor, then it all depends on your contract. For tax reasons you want the contract to be based on your company supplying services for a specified order of works. Contracts that treat you like an employee / temporary employee are bad as you get caught under some legislation called IR35 which means you can’t take all the tax breaks you can for being a company director, such as paying yourself dividends at a lower rate of tax, claiming all manner of expenses etc, But you do get employment

  • Ptorq (unregistered) in reply to mightybaldking
    mightybaldking:
    I don't know if this is just a Canadian thing, but most companies here pay on direct deposit, yet insist on cutting a cheque for final payments. I have no idea why.

    My wife had a job as an office manager a couple of years ago, and part of her duties involved dealing with this.

    Apparently in California at least it's because state law requires that you be paid out in full on your last day of work under most circumstances*; depending on exactly how things are set up, it's somewhere between "major PITA" and "literally impossible" to get a direct deposit to happen outside of the normal payroll schedule, whereas in most businesses it's relatively easy to cut a check even on fairly short notice.

    • The circumstances under which it's not are a WTF in themselves, mainly having to do with the fact that a law ostensibly to protect certain people against discrimination has the net result that those people don't get paid out as quickly.

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