• Anonymouse (unregistered) in reply to Opie
    Opie:
    You Apache people think IIS can't do everything your beloved Apache can... Think again...
    Can IIS come with the source code so I can study it and adapt it to my own needs?
  • Worf (unregistered) in reply to Anonymouse
    Anonymouse:
    Opie:
    You Apache people think IIS can't do everything your beloved Apache can... Think again...
    Can IIS come with the source code so I can study it and adapt it to my own needs?

    Better yet... can IIS run on non-x86 platforms? Or anything not running Windows? (I have had apache running on an ARM platform, running Linux. 32MB of RAM, 16MB of flash. Can IIS run on that?).

    Though, I've switched to thttpd... and the platform has been upgraded to 32MB of flash and 64MB of RAM...

  • DavidTC (unregistered) in reply to soo true

    It's astonishing how many 'web designers' think that query strings represent actual pages.

    I understand it going the other way. I've seen people thinking that all /filename.html URLs were actual files, not realizing that someone did some SEO stuff and those were actually being pulled from a DB. I've had to sit and patiently explain that URLs are sometimes not files even when they look like them, and there is no filename.html to edit, that when you ask a website for a URL it can literally return anything it wants, from an actual file to something it just made up, and different sites do different things.

    But thinking query strings are actual pages is just...mindboggling. Why the hell would anyone voluntarily name pages like that?

    And actually doing a site that way, of course, is even worse. The question is, did the designer do it because they think it's some sort of crazy standard, or were they trying to fool someone?

  • Andrew (unregistered) in reply to vertagano
    vertagano:
    brazzy:
    Besides, what we're looking at is not necessarity a WTF. I remember doing something quite similar in order to host a DB-backed site on my university account that didn't support PHP - I had a PHP app running at home and with a little fiddling made it spit out static pages which I'd then upload to the university account.

    Maybe the actual code is running somewhere else?

    Either you're WaC, or this is a much more common practice than I would have imagined.

    Even if there's a reason to create a static page mirror of a site, why have a *.aspx suffix? Use an *.html or other static suffix in case your mirror later ends-up on a site with an ASP handler (note: I've never set-up an MS webserver or ASP, but I know Apache modules well.).

    I think this consultant defrauded the customer. It looks like a sham to make the customer think there were ASP dynamic pages.

  • Hal (unregistered) in reply to Opie

    arg! Iam so tired of the apache/IIS wars... yeah I have a bunch of sites that are reporting as Apache, thats what happens when you run an Apache firewall. So what? Did you guys really think Apache was all that and a bag-o-chips?

  • Ken (unregistered) in reply to wtf

    Actually, he's right. It's not a WTF. It's what others mentioned above as wget caching. Nothing exciting to look at here...move on...

  • Ken (unregistered) in reply to wtf
    wtf:
    It is by no means WTF.
    Nope. It just means you're one of those morons we're making fun of here.

    Actually, he's right. It's not a WTF. It's what others mentioned above as wget caching. Nothing exciting to look at here...move on...

  • Pingmaster (cs) in reply to James
    James:
    Jamie:
    Mike:
    Wow......just wow.

    You can only imagine what the inside of each of those pages looks like. Probably the exact same content, with a database search parameter changed.

    what makes u so sure there is a database behind the scenes....?! :-)

    Ye an XML file would be better :-)

    I could just see that... /xml/1.xml /xml/2.xml /xml/3.xml ... /xml/15.xml /xml/16.xml /xml/17.xml

  • Mr Steve (unregistered) in reply to nowtf
    nowtf:
    It is by no means WTF. I've done that to develop sites for deployment on constrained servers - no DB, no scripts. You do this to ease your part of developement - use master page, DB, all locally. After that you wget --mirror site locally and - if properly created - you have fully functional, yet static website. I consider it normal practice in situations where it suits.

    I can appreciate what you're saying, but, can you even begin to imagine what maintaining this beast would be like for somebody else?

    That sort of approach is only cool if you either a) the client specified they will never update their website with new pages / products b) you are a sociopath, you bill your client then run like hell

  • Enzee (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Enzee (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Opie (cs) in reply to Anonymouse

    Better yet...You can just write an ISAPI plugin and be done with it. Next please. If you /really/ honestly need to modify the source of your web server, then have at it.

    Somehow I doubt you or 99.99% of other users of apache have touched the source code at all. If you have, then congratulations...You're one of the .01%. Yay?

  • Ian (unregistered)

    While I'm starting to believe that this was a cached template, it makes me wonder why they didn't just use static templates in Dreamweaver. I guess maybe they knew ASP.NET more than they knew Dreamweaver or something.

  • stiggy (unregistered) in reply to APH
    APH:
    YourMoFoFriend:
    JOHN:
    savar:
    A) You don't know how to use quote tags. B) The point that John was making is that while managed runtimes like VB.net are intended to increase developer productivity, they have the perverse side effect of lowering the bar for becoming a programmer. Then a company hires Philip Q. Shitforbrains instead of you or me because he has "tons" of VB.net experience and will work for 20% less.

    Just because you know/use/love VB.net doesn't make you an idiot. But VB.net does allow people who don't know what they're doing to get by anyway. If this project had been written in C++, the dumbass "consultant" who did this job would have never made the cut.

    At the same time, it would have taken more lines of code and more man hours to write it in C++. I think we all understand this. We just like to pick on VB because so many WTFs arise from it.

    Thank you, this was my point exactly. Languages like Visual Basic make computer languages "less scary" to the average person. I can't tell you how many times people tell me they can't figure out C# because it's too confusing "with all those symbols", and they prefer VB instead. Look, Computer Programming is a mathematics and engineering field. If you're afraid of "all those symbols", you really have no business making software.

    Software is used for important things. Your banks use it. Your cars use it. Your company uses it. Your airplanes use it. Your trains use it. Your hospital uses it. Your insurance company uses it.

    Do you really want to trust these critical systems to people who are afraid of learning what a curly bracket does?

    By that logic all good programmers write in assembly only and the really good ones in "1"-s and "0"-s directly. The idea that you can scare bad developers away by not having languages like VB is just wrong. Now, it is partially true that influx of poorly trained VB developers drove average salary down, but if it wasn't the VB it would've been another language all those people would've used. There was a huge demand for developers and marked filled the gap, regardless of the language chosen. I also happen to know for a fact that a ton of people found Java programming gigs after a week long course in Java. But sure, VB is the real WTF there... :)

    "1"-s and "0"-s? Real programmers wire up the vacuum tubes by hand!

    Luxury! We used to dream of having fancy-pants vacuum tubes.

    When I were a lad we had to cut cogs for that Mr. Babbage's difference engine with nowt but our teeth.

  • Richard (unregistered) in reply to Ken

    I'm probably going to get a WTF for not reading others talking about this, bit it's something I've done back in the days when static hosting was far far cheaper than dynamic and, although "dynamic" the page is effectively static as it doesn't change much. You build a dynamic site then use wget to get it and upload the wgotted files to the static hosting company.

    • Richard

    [Captha is Pinball - what ever happened to all the pinball machines you used to get to play on everywhere.]

  • Richard (unregistered)

    I think the likes of Visual Studio are fine for simple rapid development projects that aren't expected to stand up to heavy maintenance, but if the project is non-trivial proper software design soon pays for itself again and again in the maintenance phase, robustness to change, all sorts!

  • YourMoFoFriend (unregistered) in reply to Richard
    Richard:
    I think the likes of Visual Studio are fine for simple rapid development projects that aren't expected to stand up to heavy maintenance, but if the project is non-trivial proper software design soon pays for itself again and again in the maintenance phase, robustness to change, all sorts!
    I fail to see how a development tool, i.e. Visual Studio can stand on the way of a proper software design process?
  • misha (unregistered) in reply to YourMoFoFriend
    YourMoFoFriend:
    JOHN:
    The REAL WTF is Visual Basic. I wish people would stop trying to make it easier for idiots to program. They lower salaries and increase costs, but corporations never realize this, due to the myth that workers * hours = productivity.
    JOHN, you're a retard. Every time I see someone going "The REAL WTF is Visual Basic" it's a retard like you with overinflated ego thinking he is smarter then everyone else just because he isn't using VB. There is a million different reasons why VB (and .NET in general) is used, and quiet successfully I might add, but you wouldn't understand them anyway because you are a retard. And finally, this crap could've been just as easily done in any of the other 30 or so CLR compatible languages including C++, it's the programmer, not the language.

    YourMoFoFriend is of course right and the troll is a troll, but there is some benefit, at least to me, in having easy to pickup languages. My first language was QBasic (not even QuickBasic, the demo version you used to get with DOS).

    I saw some kids at school playing around with it, and they showed me IF THEN ELSE, GOTO, LET, PRINT and INPUT. I read the help file and was very happy writing text adventure games for a few months.

    After a while, I realised how limiting the language was and decided to learn some "proper" languages. Prior to this I had no interest in programming, and I suspect if the first language I tried had been C++ or perl this would still be the case today.

    For every (hundred) accountants who learn VBA, there's one who becomes a decent coder.

  • Anonymous Coward (unregistered) in reply to Enzee
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Jim (unregistered) in reply to rumpelstiltskin

    TROLL !

  • Foo (unregistered)

    You know what happened here! They hired a bunch of consultants to design the web site, who used a content-management system, and provided an e-commerce service. They parted company with them acrimoniously, and so had to hastily get the site up again on a new server. So they wget'ed the whole thing, and uploaded it.

  • bull (unregistered)

    C'mon people, this is the best method to counter SQL-Injection LOL Captcha: muhahaha . Muhahaha

  • kingpin (unregistered) in reply to bull
    bull:
    C'mon people, this is the best method to counter SQL-Injection LOL Captcha: muhahaha . Muhahaha
    You're funny

    Yes, we will make hackers cry and we will also cry. Imagine hundreds or even thousands of products.

    Rofl

  • omg (unregistered)

    OH-MY-GOD this is too much for me

  • i4_fan (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.

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