• freelancer (cs)

    That's just wrong on oh so many levels. (first! edit sorry!)

  • Lummox (unregistered)

    Fist!

    I always get dopey suggestions like that

  • Zylon (cs)

    People who think Google is some kind of natural-language parser make baby robo-Jesus cry.

  • zqfm (unregistered)

    note: the search with 'hose' yeilds 259k results, while with 'horse' it yeilds 517k..

  • Troy Mclure (unregistered)

    Now if it suggested "How to hook up a whore to a kitchen sink" I would be all over that.

  • tmh (unregistered)

    Actually, being the dirty old man that I am, I just HAD to try this in google image search.

    I was quite disappointed.

  • captain gaping (unregistered)

    should've quoted.

  • Jules (unregistered)

    My mom had a lot of horses. The property had a lot of mango trees. The two didn't always mix. Horses will eat stuff which gives them the bloat or stomach cramps, and then lay down and start rolling. When they do this, they can twist their intestines around and get a blockage. This is fatal in a relatively short time. The solution to this is sometimes to jam a big needle into their side, all the way into their gut, to release the gas. Sometimes you have to irrigate their colon to try to help unblock something.

    My mom had to do this and I remember her inserting a garden hose, sans metal end, into the horses rectum. That's pretty close to hooking one up to the kitchen sink.

  • CantLeadAHorse (unregistered)

    Funny, when I tried it, google suggested:

    how to hook a house to a kitchen sink

  • KattMan (cs) in reply to Jules
    Jules:
    My mom had a lot of horses. The property had a lot of mango trees. The two didn't always mix. Horses will eat stuff which gives them the bloat or stomach cramps, and then lay down and start rolling. When they do this, they can twist their intestines around and get a blockage. This is fatal in a relatively short time. The solution to this is sometimes to jam a big needle into their side, all the way into their gut, to release the gas. Sometimes you have to irrigate their colon to try to help unblock something.

    My mom had to do this and I remember her inserting a garden hose, sans metal end, into the horses rectum. That's pretty close to hooking one up to the kitchen sink.

    Maybe Nitro was Christian K's horse and he had all that part figured out and now, since he had no spigots, needed to figure out how to hook the hose up to the kitchen sink.

    In this scenario, Google made the correct suggestion.

  • Mystified (unregistered)

    Those of us who had a non-sissified up-bringing (:P) know that if you unscrew the aerator cap on the faucet, there is threading that you can screw the hose onto. Of course, most faucets these days use the tighter threading found on bathroom faucets, so you need to go to the hardware store and get a simple adapter to convert from the aerator threading to the hose threading.

  • Pon (unregistered)

    I really don't see the WTF, or the error at all.

  • Sgt. Preston (unregistered) in reply to Mystified
    Mystified:
    Those of us who had a non-sissified up-bringing (:P) know that if you unscrew the aerator cap on the faucet, there is threading that you can screw the hose onto. Of course, most faucets these days use the tighter threading found on bathroom faucets, so you need to go to the hardware store and get a simple adapter to convert from the aerator threading to the hose threading.
    Clearly Christian shouldn't have consulted Google; he should have asked the clever folks at Worse Than Failure.
  • Farmer Bob (unregistered) in reply to Mystified
    Mystified:
    Those of us who had a non-sissified up-bringing (:P) know that if you unscrew the aerator cap on the faucet, there is threading that you can screw the hose onto. Of course, most faucets these days use the tighter threading found on bathroom faucets, so you need to go to the hardware store and get a simple adapter to convert from the aerator threading to the hose threading.

    That's interesting, what country (or part of) are you from? I grew up on farms in Kentucky, living in 3 different generations of farm houses, and I've done plumbing, electrical, and construction on the side for 25 years and I've never seen a kitchen faucet that you could directly screw a hose to.

  • Jno (unregistered) in reply to Jules
    Jules:
    My mom had a lot of horses. ... Sometimes you have to irrigate their colon to try to help unblock something.

    My mom had to do this and I remember her inserting a garden hose, sans metal end, into the horses rectum. That's pretty close to hooking one up to the kitchen sink.

    Urgggh. I hope there was a non-return valve in the hose connection somewhere; horse-sh!t in your water supply is baaaaad.

    If I told you that the apposite captcha was 'stinky' would I die in flames?

  • George Nacht (unregistered) in reply to Jno

    Shame on you! Colonel Sherman Potter would have a word with you for placing the insignificant pollution of water source above the stomach problems of those noble animals!

    By the way, my c4ptch4 was ,,tastey"

  • George Nacht (unregistered) in reply to KattMan

    Damn, you just beat me to this horse name suggestion. But Nitro seems to be too short for horse name. What about ,,Cornwall Nitro"? Or "Lucky Number Nitro"?

  • poochner (cs) in reply to Jno
    Jno:
    I hope there was a non-return valve in the hose connection somewhere; horse-sh!t in your water supply is baaaaad.

    No, horse-shit in your water is just disgusting. Sheep-shit in your water is baaaaaaaaad! :-)

  • Troy Mclure (unregistered) in reply to Farmer Bob
    Farmer Bob:
    Mystified:
    Those of us who had a non-sissified up-bringing (:P) know that if you unscrew the aerator cap on the faucet, there is threading that you can screw the hose onto. Of course, most faucets these days use the tighter threading found on bathroom faucets, so you need to go to the hardware store and get a simple adapter to convert from the aerator threading to the hose threading.

    That's interesting, what country (or part of) are you from? I grew up on farms in Kentucky, living in 3 different generations of farm houses, and I've done plumbing, electrical, and construction on the side for 25 years and I've never seen a kitchen faucet that you could directly screw a hose to.

    I used to do carpet cleaning in my off-time during college and we would often have to hook the water up to the kitchen sink if they did not have an outside water source. Many sinks have a part on the bottom you just unscrew and plug in a universal part that has threads for a hose. I dont know if sinks today have that anymore - plus most have the pullout faucets

    I'm from New England if that matters.

  • LLP (unregistered)

    ...but if you want to make it drink, hooking it up to the mains water supply should do the job.

  • Simple Solution (unregistered)

    Two words....Duct Tape! Of course you will have that nasty adhesive residue left behind on your kitchen faucet, but at least you will have a clean car.

  • ssprencel (cs) in reply to Farmer Bob
    Farmer Bob:
    Mystified:
    Those of us who had a non-sissified up-bringing (:P) know that if you unscrew the aerator cap on the faucet, there is threading that you can screw the hose onto. Of course, most faucets these days use the tighter threading found on bathroom faucets, so you need to go to the hardware store and get a simple adapter to convert from the aerator threading to the hose threading.

    That's interesting, what country (or part of) are you from? I grew up on farms in Kentucky, living in 3 different generations of farm houses, and I've done plumbing, electrical, and construction on the side for 25 years and I've never seen a kitchen faucet that you could directly screw a hose to.

    No, not directly to, you have to get an adapter. here I used to see this often in trailers when I used to install kitchen appliances.

  • PS (unregistered)

    You can hook up a horse to the kitchen sink, you just can't make it drink the soapy water.

    captcha: tastey (not!!)

  • Steve G (unregistered)

    Certainly, that would quiet the neigh-sayers.

  • Garion (unregistered)

    Guess no one here has ever filled a waterbed..

    Any place that sells waterbed stuff (Walmart, target included) will also carry the adapters to hook up a standard garden hose to your normal house facets.

  • bstorer (cs) in reply to ssprencel
    ssprencel:
    Farmer Bob:
    Mystified:
    Those of us who had a non-sissified up-bringing (:P) know that if you unscrew the aerator cap on the faucet, there is threading that you can screw the hose onto. Of course, most faucets these days use the tighter threading found on bathroom faucets, so you need to go to the hardware store and get a simple adapter to convert from the aerator threading to the hose threading.

    That's interesting, what country (or part of) are you from? I grew up on farms in Kentucky, living in 3 different generations of farm houses, and I've done plumbing, electrical, and construction on the side for 25 years and I've never seen a kitchen faucet that you could directly screw a hose to.

    No, not directly to, you have to get an adapter. here I used to see this often in trailers when I used to install kitchen appliances.

    Agreed. I've never seen a kitchen faucet threaded such that a hose can be directly attached. Hose bibs are typically 3/4" hose thread, whereas a faucet can be any of a number of sizes. For example, it could be 13/16", 15/16", or even the mind-numbing 55/64".

  • BiggBru (cs) in reply to Troy Mclure
    Troy Mclure:
    Now if it suggested "How to hook up a whore to a kitchen sink" I would be all over that.

    I believe there is an instructional video out there called "Black Snake Moan".

  • Rolf (unregistered)

    That's not really that big a wtf.

    Horse IS close to hose in spelling and automated services knows nothing about reality. :P

  • James (unregistered)

    Heh, that's funny. Suppose I have a word, and I'm not sure which one of two ways it's spelled... whichever wins a GoogleFight is probably right. I call it "collaborative spellcheck".

    Apparently not so good for whole sentences, though.

  • Carnildo (cs) in reply to Jno
    Jno:
    Jules:
    My mom had a lot of horses. ... Sometimes you have to irrigate their colon to try to help unblock something.

    My mom had to do this and I remember her inserting a garden hose, sans metal end, into the horses rectum. That's pretty close to hooking one up to the kitchen sink.

    Urgggh. I hope there was a non-return valve in the hose connection somewhere; horse-sh!t in your water supply is baaaaad.

    IIRC, building codes in most parts of the US mandate non-return valves be installed inline with any outdoor spigots.

  • boolean (cs) in reply to Zylon
    Zylon:
    People who think Google is some kind of natural-language parser make baby robo-Jesus cry.
    Google isn't a natural language parser, but the millions of pages it searches are written in natural language. If simple keyword searches aren't specific enough for what I need, I'll type in the entire phrase of what I'm trying to do, and usually there's a forum post or article about how to do it.
  • hose (unregistered) in reply to zqfm
    zqfm:
    note: the search with 'hose' yeilds 259k results, while with 'horse' it yeilds 517k..

    Worse than failure!? Now that's strange...

  • Nex (unregistered) in reply to Jules

    Remind me to never get horses....

  • MichaelWojcik (cs) in reply to bstorer
    bstorer:
    Agreed. I've never seen a kitchen faucet threaded such that a hose can be directly attached. Hose bibs are typically 3/4" hose thread, whereas a faucet can be any of a number of sizes. For example, it could be 13/16", 15/16", or even the mind-numbing 55/64".

    On the other hand, you can get aerators for hose bibs. I have a set tub in my basement with a hose bib for a faucet, and it has such an aerator, as the overly-enthusiastic unaerated stream tended to splash out of the tub.

    If your kitchen sink were supplied with hose bibs rather than proper kitchen faucets, then you could unscrew an aerator and attach a hose. And I imagine that if you had that sort of kitchen sink, you'd probably have plenty of reasons for doing so. [Insert Jeff Foxworthy-style "humorous" reference to the doings of the unsophisticated classes here.]

  • Abscissa (unregistered) in reply to poochner
    poochner:
    Jno:
    I hope there was a non-return valve in the hose connection somewhere; horse-sh!t in your water supply is baaaaad.

    No, horse-shit in your water is just disgusting. Sheep-shit in your water is baaaaaaaaad! :-)

    Sheep puns are baaaaaaaaad. ;)

  • newfweiler (cs) in reply to zqfm
    zqfm:
    note: the search with 'hose' yeilds 259k results, while with 'horse' it yeilds 517k..
    Many of the results with 'hose' appear to address the question. None of the results with 'horse' do.
  • No one important (unregistered) in reply to bstorer
    bstorer:
    Agreed. I've never seen a kitchen faucet threaded such that a hose can be directly attached. Hose bibs are typically 3/4" hose thread, whereas a faucet can be any of a number of sizes. For example, it could be 13/16", 15/16", or even the mind-numbing 55/64".

    but have you ever seen a kitchen faucet that can be directly attached to a horse?

  • Hubert Farnsworth (cs)

    Hey hey, here's a delight from German Google:

    [image]

    Conclusion? A horse, that's nothing ...

  • sb (unregistered)
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  • Mystified (unregistered) in reply to Farmer Bob

    I grew up in upstate New York. Just to make sure I wasn't crazy, I talked to a couple of my siblings, and they also remember the kitchen sinks (and the set tub in the garage, though that's probably less surprising) in all of our houses (we moved a lot) being hose-ready.

    It's probably one of those regional things. Certainly down here in Texas I've never seen a kitchen faucet like that. Again, though, you can get an adaptor.

  • bstorer (cs) in reply to Mystified
    Mystified:
    I grew up in upstate New York. Just to make sure I wasn't crazy, I talked to a couple of my siblings, and they also remember the kitchen sinks (and the set tub in the garage, though that's probably less surprising) in all of our houses (we moved a lot) being hose-ready.

    It's probably one of those regional things. Certainly down here in Texas I've never seen a kitchen faucet like that. Again, though, you can get an adaptor.

    It's not uncommon for laundry tub faucets to use hose thread. Por ejemplo. If you had a laundry tub faucet in your kitchen, then it's probably hose thread. Older homes in rural areas are more likely to have such a setup. Further, if your home's faucet were on, say, FDNY or Chicago Fire threading (or something similar), then a garden hose may attach. But, I've never seen or heard of an FDNY or Chicago threaded faucet. Come to think of it, I've never seen FDNY or Chicago threads in 3/4", though my pipe book insists they exist. Still, I suppose it's possible.

  • Mike Daniels (unregistered)

    Solving the age-old problem of how to get the horse to drink.

  • SteveF (unregistered)

    Years ago I used a water bed sink adapter to hookup a hose to the sink.

  • Fintux (unregistered)

    Funny thing, I read the original search saying "horse" without having a glance to the google suggestion. Maybe I should go to sleep already...

  • Bob (unregistered)

    Reminds me of some other google search results or suggested alternatives.

    "French Military Victories"

    used to return with a suggestion

    Did you mean " French Military Defeats"

    A search for "weapons of massdestruction" (yes without the space. Has been archived on a site to display what originally came up, what looked like an error page, but with some interesting text replaced.

  • RobertB (cs) in reply to Nex
    Nex:
    Remind me to never get horses....
    I have horses... and trust me, the poster with the extreme veterinary advice is only scratching the surface. There is a very, very good chance that you should NOT google "horse sheath care".
  • nwbrown (cs) in reply to Simple Solution
    Simple Solution:
    Two words....Duct Tape! Of course you will have that nasty adhesive residue left behind on your kitchen faucet, but at least you will have a clean car.

    Yeah, I tried something like that once. It didn't exactly work that well. Turns out tape isn't very waterproof. And it doesn't hold up to water pressure. It did help me mop the kitchen floor though...

  • Rofa (unregistered)

    Sometimes it just seems like Google's mind's in the gutter.

    A friend of mine did a search on Google Finland for the swedish word "lövsågning" = "jigsawing". Apparently bored by the subject, Google merrily suggested "avsugning" = "blowjob".

  • seconddevil (unregistered)
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