• (nodebb)

    So the cancel/cancel thing is just "Do you want to continue cancelling the thing or do you want to cancel cancelling the thing?"...

  • bvs23bkv33 (unregistered)

    So I just closed the browser and pushed power button for sure

  • not a robot (unregistered)

    Does HTML 503 error mean you have 503 errors in your markup?

  • (nodebb)

    I love the exuberance in Paul V.'s submission!

  • (nodebb)

    "When news breaks, we fix it!" (thanks to Kilborn in the early years of The Daily Show)

  • Kleyguerth (github)

    I see no WTF in the calendar one. They used a lib that limits the max date at 2699, so what? IT is the same category of WTF as the list of languages from some Error'ds ago: devs doing it right.

  • sizer99 (google) in reply to Kleyguerth

    The WTF is that it's 700 years worth of future pulldown options for a /past/ date field. Since the syntax is '<option value = "2500">2500</option>', that's 40 * 700 = 28KB worth of completely useless crap sent every page. Okay, that's not much compared to today's bloated web pages, but who knows what Firefox and Chrome will further bloat that up into for memory use, probably 28 MB. Oh but you want to future proof the page so nobody will ever have to touch it ever again (hah, as if). Fine, make it 100 years. The page will not survive 100 years without being modified - it's still huge overkill but at least not completely ridiculous.

    Is it a giant WTF? No. But it is a small one.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Kleyguerth

    I suppose it makes sense if you're recording that part of your educational history that lies in the future.

  • Boris Lenikov (unregistered) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic

    Contrary to what a lot of UI "experts" think, YES and NO are valid answers to a yes-no question!

  • (nodebb) in reply to Boris Lenikov

    Agreed. I would have phrased it as:

    Are you sure you want to cancel ${operation}? [Yes] [No]

  • Olivier (unregistered)

    As per the picture, only flights delivering luggage on belt 6 are from Singapore and Denpasar. Such error are not uncommon in Thai airports. Many eons ago, before smartphone existed, when Don Muang was still Bangkok international airport, I once saw an IP conflict message on such a screen.

  • (nodebb)

    I'd love to know who makes these giant bespoke dot matrix LED displays which seem to exclusively accept video input from a windows PC. I've worked with lots of these LED displays before (never that big, but close) and they all use some non-standardized esoteric ASCII based protocol full of weird escape sequences (and invariably no error checking or even the notion of an "Ack"). Is there an advantage to displaying the output of a PC's desktop, aside from the chance of embarrassing moments opportunities to publicly display your ineptitude via the presence of BSODs, C++ Run-time failure dialogs, windows update messages, or "This copy of windows is not genuine" messages?

    Addendum 2019-11-04 04:49: And just as a side note. I've never seen anyone post a pic of one crashed out to a Gnome desktop (not that it would be any better, and for anything media related, Windows is probably more reliable). Perhaps it's some bespoke interface hardware that only has drivers for Windows... but it's still weird.

  • (nodebb)

    I'd love to know who makes these giant bespoke dot matrix LED displays which seem to exclusively accept video input from a windows PC. I've worked with lots of these LED displays before (never that big, but close) and they all use some non-standardized esoteric ASCII based protocol full of weird escape sequences (and invariably no error checking or even the notion of an "Ack"). Is there an advantage to displaying the output of a PC's desktop, aside from the chance of embarrassing moments opportunities to publicly display your ineptitude via the presence of BSODs, C++ Run-time failure dialogs, windows update messages, or "This copy of windows is not genuine" messages?

  • Kleyguerth (github) in reply to Watson

    It might be some cultural difference, but where I live you can look for a job while still studying and you should input what's the expected date for the end of your graduation. In these cases the end is in the future.

    But even if it doesn't work like that over there, it still isn't a WTF. The lib shows those dates, great, it might not have a limit attribute, just validate it to be in the past when submitting the form.

  • Angela Anuszewski (google) in reply to jkshapiro

    That's kind of a niche thing, but those little blue penguin thingies are from the Disgaea video game series and are called prinnies. They are basically souls of evil humans bound to those bodies and forced to serve demons as servants as penance. So, that's probably more exasperation than exuberance, dood. (Oh, and they end every sentence they say with 'dood', dood...)

  • Olivier (unregistered) in reply to idzy

    I don't think that the display only work with PC, actually, the one shown on the picture seems to be working with a monitor output, being VGA or HDMI or whatever. I have even seen some connected to video out, like the output of a camcoder. But the companies that develop the software to display on these arrival screens are working only in windows for some reason.

    Now, talking about the scrolling display that uses serial connection with strange ASCII sequences, I once connected one to some Unix box to display the network usage during a show. But I had to read the manual, understand how it worked and develop the thing myself, I could not simply punch the text to display.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Olivier

    Yeah, but the clock still works, and the DPI changes at the lower part of the display. I really don't get it. Yes, all those horrible bespoke protocols are annoying, but somewhat make sense. A display output, to decode VGA or HDMI and map it to a dot matrix array, without full color, and be pixel perfect. Certainly an engineering achievement, but WHY?

  • (nodebb) in reply to Olivier

    Yeah, but the clock still works, and the DPI changes at the lower part of the display. I really don't get it. Yes, all those horrible bespoke protocols are annoying, but somewhat make sense. A display output, to decode VGA or HDMI and map it to a dot matrix array, without full color, and be pixel perfect. Certainly an engineering achievement, but WHY?

  • (nodebb) in reply to Kleyguerth

    So there are two options if they use a 3rd party lib:

    a) The lib allows configuring the end year but they didn't bother to do that. b) The lib doesn't allow configuring the end year, which is hard-coded to 2699.

    Both are 100% WTFs. And the problem is not that somebody can enter future dates, but

    1. It is possible to enter completely ridiculous years like 2450, far outside the life expectancy of a human being. Arguably, it is unclear what exact limit would be best, but consider:
    2. A drop down box with hundreds of entries is simply always a terrible idea for a UI.

    And don't try to argue defensive programming. There is a difference between defensive programming and clinical paranoia.

  • Laharl (unregistered) in reply to Angela Anuszewski

    I once saw an error page on a game related site, which had a picture of a Prinny (the blue penguin), and a message stating "404 error. Last time we let Prinnies do the job."

    Note for those who haven't played Disgaea: the Prinnies are considered horribly inefficient labor in-game. They explain it as something like having 23 hour work days, no lunch or coffee breaks, no weekends, and a bonus of one lollipop per week. Also, if you lift and throw them, they explode. So they are frequently seen skimping work and revolting.

  • corky (unregistered) in reply to sizer99
    Comment held for moderation.
  • corky (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.

Leave a comment on “Airport via TCP”

Log In or post as a guest

Replying to comment #:

« Return to Article