• Tsaukpaetra (disco)

    Sequential user story made code?

  • dkf (disco)

    Oh well, at least those large uploads won't be failing any more!

  • The_Dark_Lord (disco)

    It all depends on whether size is computed in imperial or metric bytes.

  • Steve_The_Cynic (disco)

    First sentence of the article: "Code changes over time."

    Wrong.

    Programmers change code. If they leave it alone, it doesn't change.

    What maintenance programmers do is not actually maintenance, or at least not in the way that is meant by that word when we talk about maintenance of a car or a central heating boiler. Maintenance programmers are more like the guys who change the bogus part of your car when there's a factory recall and/or the guys who fit aftermarket 'pimp my ride' parts.

    There, I'll leave you with that thought on a sunny Monday afternoon. (In my timezone it's afternoon, and where I'm at, it's sunny. But it's Monday and I'm in the office instead of out there somewhere learning how to use my skates. :cry: )

  • dkf (disco) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic
    Steve_The_Cynic:
    Programmers change code. If they leave it alone, it doesn't change.

    But environments and expectations do change over time.

  • Jaloopa (disco) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic

    An application that interfacdes with a web service will need maintenence in the more traditional sense if the web service changes or the original version is obsoleted. I'm sure there are other cases where maintenence isn't all pimp my ride

  • RFoxmich (disco) in reply to The_Dark_Lord

    At first I thought this was a joke then I realized that in typical metric/imperial style:

    • 1Kbytes = 1000 metric bytes
    • 1Kbytes = 1024 imperial bytes
  • Rhywden (disco) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic
    Comment held for moderation.
  • martin (disco)

    Commented out unused code is a code smell. Always!

    But this is PHP. It smells as a whole so you are unable to identify code smell.

  • Jaloopa (disco) in reply to martin
    martin:
    Commented out unused code is a code smell. Always!

    In a previous job, I came across a few hundred line #region commented out code in a C# application.

  • boomzilla (disco) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic
    Steve_The_Cynic:
    ``` // In my timezone it's afternoon, and where I'm at, it's sunny. ```
    ``` It's morning and it's raining here. :crying_cat_face: ```
  • kjordan2001 (disco)

    Well, at least it's ensuring that the file hasn't gotten any bigger. I suppose that could be some sort of primitive virus check to make sure it hasn't been rewritten.

  • Protoman (disco)

    Dana inherited some pretty awful PHP

    All PHP is awful, but some PHP is more awful than others.

  • Yazeran (disco) in reply to kjordan2001

    OK, just to make sure, I have no PHP experience, but I would be surprised if a virus rewrite of a file (on disk or on the users system) could in any way change the value of $_FILES['userfile']['size'] which I assume is set upon file upload (by the OS) and not recalculated whenever the value is actually used (if so then I guess PHP is even MORE bad than I have been led to believe).

    For me it looks like a hash of hashes ($_FILES is a hash of all files uploaded in current http request and ['userfile'] points to a hash containing info on the file associated with the file-field named 'userfile').

  • Steve_The_Cynic (disco) in reply to dkf
    dkf:
    Steve_The_Cynic:
    Programmers change code. If they leave it alone, it doesn't change.

    But environments and expectations do change over time.

    Indeed, which is (one reason) why programmers change the code.
  • Steve_The_Cynic (disco) in reply to Jaloopa
    Jaloopa:
    An application that interfacdes with a web service will need maintenence in the more traditional sense if the web service changes or the original version is obsoleted. I'm sure there are other cases where maintenence isn't all pimp my ride
    No, that's not traditional maintenance, in the sense of verifying that parts haven't worn out and replacing the ones that have. That's the third branch of modifications (the one I forgot about), where things external to the program change and the program must be changed to adapt to them. It can include changes to some external API (it's rather broader than just web services, too), but also adapting to changes in regulatory environments such as tax codes.

    The real-world analogue of that is what you must do to an engine to adapt it to a mandated switch to a new fuel mix. I wouldn't call that maintenance. (OK, maybe now we are arguing about definitions...)

  • Slapout (disco)

    I think I'm going to make my own programming language that's compatible with C. Only, it will ignore the comment markers and run all lines of code -- even if they are commented out. I'll call it "Chaos".

  • JustChecking (unregistered)

    [image]<SCRIPT>Hello</SCRIPT> Just checking because it uses HTML.Raw()

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