• bvs23bkv33 (unregistered)

    frist can not be casted to java.lang.double

  • Athanasius (unregistered)
    1. Also, what's up with the Starting Price / Savings / Final Price on that mouse and keyboard?

    2. The 13/100 = 12% might be a combination of binary representation and truncating (rather than 'half-rounding') the result.

  • David Jackson (unregistered)

    Presumably the website knows you want to have steak for your tea. I like steak and chips for tea.

  • that other guy (unregistered) in reply to David Jackson

    Do Americans use the term "tea" to mean dinner? Either way, point taken; can't argue with a good steak for tea.

  • someone (unregistered)

    So "solar" is a TLD now? Where does it end? (It doesn't, I know)

    I've experienced that same percentage error with Win 7. Another thing it does it is floor the result, so e.g. 236/300 is presented as 78%.

  • RLB (unregistered)

    Stopping jokers from trying to register with <current president>'s name is reasonable, but spare a thought for people who really do share a famous politician's name... can't be fun being called Theresa May and living in Scotland.

    As for the Disney one, it might just be a typo. Or it might not.

  • Whocares? (unregistered)

    Can't spell steak without tea. Yeah, it's a deep one.

  • brian (unregistered)

    Everyone knows there is tea in steak I don't get the first one about SQL. Not obvious at all at a glance The price savings don't add up (or in this case get subtracted out)

  • (nodebb)

    TEA matched sTEAk, I guess.

  • David Jackson (unregistered) in reply to that other guy

    I don't know about Americans, but here in Cheshire (and most of the northern part of the UK), the evening meal is called tea, unless you are very posh of course in which case it would be dinner. I'll probably be having fish and chips for tea tonight, but steak takes some beating.

  • Adam (unregistered)

    Can someone ELI5 the first one? Is it the double-quote in the word "Disney''s"? To me that could have been just a typo in the title...

  • stuartd (unregistered) in reply to Athanasius

    Looks like money laundering to me.

  • Reginald P. Smithington (unregistered) in reply to David Jackson

    No one "takes tea" here or calls a meal "tea". "Tea" refers exclusively to the beverage.

  • Brian Boorman (google) in reply to Adam

    Especially since ' and " are on the same key on the keyboard. Someone just bumped the shift key. TRWTF is that this was conflated to a SQL thing and became the whole basis for the title of today"s article.

  • (nodebb)

    With the money you save on that keyboard and mouse, you could buy a sweet gaming system to go with it.

  • Perri Nelson (unregistered)

    18 - 4 != 16 except for either very large values of 18 or very small values of 4.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Brian Boorman

    Especially since ' and " are on the same key on the keyboard

    No they're not. " is unshifted 3, and ' is unshifted 4.

    Addendum 2018-09-21 11:10: Unless you have some weird foreign keyboard.

  • (nodebb)

    Too bad none of those pieces of meat were Tea-bone steaks. My guess is that the tea in the catalogue is listed as "Earl Grey leaves-loose", "Orange Pekoe leaves in bag" or something like that.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic

    On my US-Standard keyboard, # is shifted-3 and $ is shifted-4. The quotes are on the same key over by the big Enter key.

  • Benjamin (unregistered)

    Wow, hot new rounding errors from 2012! The Daily WTF really has it's finger on the pulse of bleeding edge information technology mishaps. I bet those silly Microsoft employees, who surely still have the same jobs, are feeling properly chastened right now.

  • MB (unregistered) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic

    On my UK keyboard, " is shifted 2 and £ is shifted 3. Strangely, unshifted 2 is 2 and unshifted 3 is 3...

  • Well (unregistered)

    Here we are in 2018 and IT professionals are still surprised that different countries have different keyboard layouts. # or £, which one's the pound symbol?

    hint: it's shift-3 /ducks

  • o11c (unregistered)

    For single-precision floats, 13/100 = 0.1299999952

    For double-precision floats, 13/100 = 0.1300000000000000044

    This is why if you're going to show a percentage, multiply by 100 first.

  • Free Bird (unregistered) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic

    Apparently you're the one with the weird foreign keyboard. On an IBM Model M keyboard, which is obviously the one and only reference keyboard for all eternity, ' and " occupy the same key.

    Ergo, you must be British.

  • (nodebb)

    Sorry brits, Al Gore invented the internet, so US keyboard is the correct one.

  • WTFGuy (unregistered) in reply to RLB

    Ref RLB's >> Stopping jokers from trying to register with <current president>'s name is reasonable, but spare a thought for people who really do share a famous politician's name... can't be fun being called Theresa May and living in Scotland.

    At my first legit IT job back in Ye Olden Tymes my manager was named "Ronald McDonald". He was about 6 years old when the hamburger clown was invented. He must've had a rough life as a kid after that.

    I bet it's been years since he's been allowed to register on random websites under his own name. He's probably on the TSA no fly list too as an obvious alias.

    Poor guy.

  • Zom-B (unregistered) in reply to Athanasius

    floor(0.13D) = 13, floor(0.13F) == 12

    http://www.binaryconvert.com/result_float.html?decimal=048046049051

  • DCL (unregistered) in reply to tahir_ahmadov

    Computer keyboards were around before the internet as you certainly know...

  • bobcat (unregistered) in reply to that other guy

    We do not have a tradition of teatime, no. The word 'tea' refers exclusively to the beverage. If you need to reference it to Americans, one should say 'afternoon tea' to differentiate it from just a cup therof.

    While we're at it, American meals are 'breakfast', 'lunch', and 'dinner'. 'Supper' is almost never used, 'luncheon' is often a more formal meal, and 'brunch' is a light meal in between breakfast and lunch, ostensibly because someone is missing one or the other due to plans.

    My favorite meal name is 'midrats', which is short for 'midnight rations', as on a Navy vessel (especially submarines) there needs to be something for the late shift to eat in the middle of the night. It's often unusual bits of leftovers or whatever is convenient.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Free Bird

    Ergo, you must be British.

    The conclusion is correct, but the reasoning behind it is faulty. My keyboard has 3 as the shifted version of " and 4 as the shifted version of ', and that's actually a French layout (AZERTY), with the main-keyboard numbers all requiring shift.

  • (nodebb) in reply to bobcat

    While we're at it, American meals are 'breakfast', 'lunch', and 'dinner'. 'Supper' is almost never used, 'luncheon' is often a more formal meal, and 'brunch' is a light meal in between breakfast and lunch, ostensibly because someone is missing one or the other due to plans.

    I've heard plenty of Americans refer to the evening meal as "supper", which confused me endlessly because in Britain, "supper" is an bedtime light snack. It might be one of those things that depends on where in the country you live.

    And most uses of "brunch" that I've heard in America suggested a relatively large meal at the same sort of time as lunch, but structured as a sort of breakfast-lunch fusion. Another regional thing?

  • David Jackson (unregistered) in reply to bobcat

    In the UK, it varies depending on where you are. Here in the northern half of the UK, the meals are usually breakfast, dinner and tea, with supper as a light snack before going to bed. In the south, it's more likely to be breakfast, lunch and dinner with supper the same as in the north. There's a lot of variation though and you can't say for certain that that's what someone in a particular place with say. That dinner is a different meal in different places can cause confusion. Tea in the south is (apart from a drink) usually afternoon tea; a light snack of cakes etc, whereas in the north, tea is the main evening meal when getting home from work. It's not as clear cut as that of course and it depends a lot on background and many other factors. It's not uncommon for dinner to be used for the evening meal in the north, but rarer (if it happens at all) for the evening meal to be called tea in the south.

  • Free Bird (unregistered) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic

    I figured your command of the English language was too good for you to be French. ;)

  • Jeffrey Chadwell (google) in reply to bobcat

    "Dinner" refers to the largest meal of the day. In much of the U.S., that means "supper." But in the Southeast U.S., you'll find many people who use "dinner" to mean "lunch," because that's traditionally been the largest meal of the day there.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Well

    I can't find the ducks key on my keyboard

  • I dunno LOL ¯\(°_o)/¯ (unregistered) in reply to bobcat

    Usually in the US, "supper" means the third meal, aka == "dinner". There is also a somewhat archaic US usage (maybe in the Southern states?) of "supper" being the second meal, and "dinner" being the third meal, but it can also be the other way around, with "dinner" being the second meal. I think it has to do with religious interpretation of the phrase "The Last Supper".

    Also, "brunch" : "breakfast + brunch" can lead to an ironical construct of "linner" : "lunch + dinner". It is generally used in a silly context.

    But basically, breakfast=1, brunch=1.5, lunch=2, dinner=3, supper=3 is the ANSI standard.

  • (nodebb)

    http://howmanyofme.com/people/Donald_Trump/ (There are 21 in the US alone)

  • (nodebb)

    It is utterly amazing how many bugs are in Microsoft's card games

  • Friedrice the Great (unregistered) in reply to WTFGuy

    One of my friends in high school was named Benjamin Franklin. He had a car. Whenever the cops stopped him, their first words were, "Yeah, what's your real name?"

  • Friedrice the Great (unregistered) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic

    "Supper" is the evening meal in the American South.

  • RLB (unregistered) in reply to MB

    On a civilised keyboard, " is symbol shift P and ' is symbol shift 7, and there's an end to it.

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