• Brian Boorman (google)

    Looks to me like the offer is good until September 5th. That's still another 10 days.

  • Prime Mover (unregistered)

    Perhaps we could send our unwelcome migrants to Bouvet Island. That would take the heat off of Rwanda.

  • Darren (unregistered)

    Can anyone see what's the 'wtf' on the last screenshot? Just looks like some AWS config page.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Darren

    I think the point is that the submitter sent the wrong image, i.e. a PEBCAK.

  • (nodebb)

    I didn't think this was the kind of site that made fun of contributors?

    Just because the person accidentally sent the wrong screenshot doesn't invalidate the reported error.

  • Darren (unregistered) in reply to Athanasius

    Ah, I see. Seems a little bit unfair on the submitter.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Darren

    I wonder a little at the arn:aws:s3:::budgets-console-assets-preprod-iad-budgets-logging at the top, but if that's normal, then OK.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Brian Boorman

    Clearly the WTF there is that Blizzard didn't customize the message for European gamers. /s

    More likely it's that the European gamer likes to point fingers at the stupid American company.

  • Foo AKA Fooo (unregistered)

    Every denizen of Bouvet Island is entitled to worldwide free shipping!

    This statement is actually true -- vacuously true (the best kind of true).

  • I'm not a robot (unregistered) in reply to Darren
    Can anyone see what's the 'wtf' on the last screenshot? Just looks like some AWS config page.
    Using AWS *is* the WTF.
  • Tim (unregistered)

    I notice 9,233,372,... is approx 2^63 so I'm guessing the drive somehow reported 0 bytes total disk size, thus resulting in a negative number for bytes free, which was stored in a 64 bit value and incorrectly formatted as if it was unsigned

  • OldCoder (unregistered) in reply to Tim

    It looks like a Windows drive... 'nuff said.

  • Anonymous') OR 1=1; DROP TABLE wtf; -- (unregistered)

    First is probably an Amazon Elastic File System volume. EFS always reports the disk size as (2^64 - 4 KiB) = 9223372036854771712.

  • tbo (unregistered) in reply to I'm not a robot

    Why?

  • Anonymous') OR 1=1; DROP TABLE wtf; -- (unregistered) in reply to Anonymous') OR 1=1; DROP TABLE wtf; --

    Correction: (2^63 - 4 KiB) = 9223372036854771712. 63rd power, not 64th power

  • (nodebb) in reply to Brian Boorman

    I remember when Europeans would make fun of us Americans for not having any knowledge of things outside our borders.

    Europeans seem to have worked hard to catch up with us in this regard. Not sure they should be proud of this.

  • Your Name (unregistered) in reply to Bim Zively

    I'm clearly one of the Europeans who caught up: I thought the American way of writing a date is with slashes. So for example 1/2/22 is the second January 2022. European way is to use dots and use the order day.month.year (2.1.22 for the same date). And then there is the ISO style with dashes and year first 2022-01-02 (which is great if you sort something alphanumerical).

    Is there really a commonly used variant of writing the American date order of month/day/year together with dots?

  • (author) in reply to Darren

    It's just funny that the submission IS the error in this case. All submissions are semi-anonymous so nobody's really being dragged hard. You can also find some previous columns which include errors by me or the website, and there are likely to be more such.

  • (nodebb)

    I found the same image in a European language, delimited with SLASHES as 05/09/2022 https://adrenaline.com.br/uploads/2022/08/23/78152/Blizzard_copias_gratuitas_World_of_Warcraft_Shadowlands_-_01.jpg

    If slashes are really uncommon in Europe then I guess Blizzard has multiple WTFs in the image on the article -- using US date order, with dots, delivered to a European gamer.

  • Angela (unregistered) in reply to Your Name

    I don't think there's a "standard separator". Typically most people would use "/" but slashes, dashes, and dots all work. When I see Blizzard using dots, I think they are being acceptable but a bit pretentious.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Tim

    I once managed to create a file with a length of -1 on an Apollo Domain workstation. It failed to boot on initial disk validation, as the file was a bit larger than the 200 megabyte hard drive, with a 32 bit file system.

    Fortunately all I had to do was toggle the Root/User mode switch on the back panel of the box, hit reset, enter a cryptic superuser shell and delete the file.. and the sysops never knew.

    Another WTF was the time I kicked a SCSI cable out of the back of the machine I was using, not realising it was also one of the file servers. ..

  • I'm not a robot (unregistered) in reply to tbo

    Because it's utterly shite.

  • (author) in reply to Your Name

    Using dots as separators is a euro-affectation in the States, e.g. in telephone numbers and dates. So it is entirely possible that someone might mix dot-separation and US ordering, just to make things more horribly confusing. But the bottom line is this: it is hereby declared that the One True Error'd Date Format shall be ISO 8601! All transgressors will be, hm. Snidely chided, in doggerel and/or pun. That should be terrifying.

  • Your Name (unregistered) in reply to Lyle Seaman

    Thanks for the explanation @Angela and @Lyle Seaman. I thought dots are unusual for the US ordering. Thanks for correcting me there.

    By the way: Normally phone numbers in Germany are not separated using dots. Usually people group them using spaces. Sometimes slashes or dashes. But dots are very rare.

  • (nodebb)

    By the way: Normally phone numbers in Germany are not separated using dots. Usually people group them using spaces. Sometimes slashes or dashes. But dots are very rare.

    Same in France, except that it's almost always spaces, and almost never dashes. You'll usually see: 03 28 54 72 56 (and you'll know it's Kim's friend's number), or 0328547256 in most "enter your telephone number here" web forms, but not 03-28-54-72-56.

  • markm (unregistered)

    The website uses US date order above ("August 23") so I'd assume that it's also used when the month is a number. OTOH, the dot separators are unusual in US dates. I recall seeing this only in telephone numbers, as written by "Euro-pretentious" Americans. If you're going to use dots in a date, you ought to use the day-first format - if these are normal even in Europe.

    And a company that intends to market internationally ought to be aware that 9/5/2022 is ambiguous and either localize the format or use a format that distinguishes the month and day.

  • WTFGuy (unregistered)

    In addition to Euro-pretension, some of motivation for using dots as separators in US phone numbers, dates, etc., is tech-pretension.

    Back in the early internet days when ordinary biz-people were first getting introduced to dotted-octet IP addresses, lots of marketers decided the latest coolness required the same dots in phone numbers. That was how you signaled that your company was "internet-savvy" and fully aimed at the limitless future of e-commerce. Or some such shite.

    Double-plus-good bonus points if your business was in IT. Dotted phone numbers became practically de rigeur in that milieu. And many have stayed that way 20+ years later.

    The nice part about standards is how many there are to choose from: https://xkcd.com/927/

  • Angela (unregistered) in reply to WTFGuy

    I was briefly in an IEEE working group trying to come up with a universal "wall wart" standard when someone in the meeting blurts out, "Doesn't USB-C do all this already?" The working group promptly disbanded.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Brian Boorman

    Clearly 9.5.2022 means the 2022nd of May in the year 9.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Your Name

    European way is to use dots What European way is that? Down here in my littie corner of Europe that format is extremely unusual. Dashes are mostly used, and occasionally slashes. Never dots.

    Using dots as separators is a euro-affectation in the States, e.g. in telephone numbers and dates. Dots in phone numbers? Again, in what European country is that normal, because I hardly ever see that. Spaces yes, a dash after the country- and area-codes, sure. But no dots.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Angela

    I was briefly in an IEEE working group trying to come up with a universal "wall wart" standard when someone in the meeting blurts out, "Doesn't USB-C do all this already?" The working group promptly disbanded.

    This restores my faith in humanity.

  • Your Name (unregistered) in reply to nerd4sale

    Yes, I have clearly generalized too much here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_format_by_country

    Some European countries use that format with dots but it seems to be mixed.

  • (nodebb) in reply to Athanasius

    PEBCAK

    I was going to mock you for your error, but I realised it works both ways. The article has "PEBKAC".

  • phone code archeologist (unregistered) in reply to Steve_The_Cynic
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Bonehead (unregistered)

    Yeah, we use dd.mm.yyyy. I would never use dd/mm/yyyy. Seems werid. Phone numbers are grouped ddd dd ddd if youre old, and dd dd dd dd if you're young, depending on if you learned to use the phone before or after the introduction of the cellphone, and we stopped caring about area codes and direction numbers.

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