• ObiWayneKenobi (cs)

    At least the interviewer was able to out the crook, or this would have been another Paula Bean like story. Although it makes you wonder, if the guy was project lead at his old company, COULD he actually code? Was he just some incompetent nitwit who was trying to BS his way into a better job, or something else?

  • Geoff (unregistered) in reply to ObiWayneKenobi

    Most likely he had actually delivered some project put together with duct tape, bailing wire, some bubble gum, and tons of copy/paste code from whatever Google results produced.

    He managed to twist the arms of the folks doing the code review; or gave them said puppy dog eyes and sob story about how he really needs this one but there have been problems at home and he'll get it fixed in the next deployment cycle really...

    Management is/was happy enough for the moment but he knew if he hung around much longer was going to be exposed.

  • Dogsworth (cs)

    Fred sounds like some of the contractors we get.

  • Quango (cs)

    ALWAYS test candidates' coding ability. Jeff Attwood's article http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2007/02/why-cant-programmers-program.html is six years old and still holds.

    I interviewed one guy who spent over an hour trying to write a FizzBuzz routine. He had a masters degree in CS.

  • Michael (unregistered)

    That's why economists call it "market for lemons".

  • Kuli (unregistered)

    One can make a comment with

    <!--<a href="/">My comment</a> -->

    But it is visible in the page source code in browser.

    (Note: This comment was copied from Stackoverflow)

  • Remy Porter (cs) in reply to Quango

    My initial instinct was to say, "a fizzbuzz algorithm is way too easy for a coding test," but y'know what? Apparently I'm wrong.

    It's almost a one-liner in a number of different languages.

  • It'sMeMario (unregistered)

    TRWTF was that he made it that far into the interview. He doesn't know what a URL is, and just read out the internet.

  • Don (unregistered) in reply to Quango
    Comment held for moderation.
  • henke37 (cs)

    Now I want to know what the question he plagiarized was.

  • ZoomST (unregistered)

    I was about to say something about how unpolite is to hang the phone without thanking him for its time, but I didn't found any example in Stack Overflow. So I'm going to post the question there and put the UML of the answer here. Or is it the YRL?

  • dude (unregistered)

    I assume you meant cheats, not cheetahs?

  • almien (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • annon (unregistered)
            int[] arr1 = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };
            int[] arr2 = { 1, 5, 10, 11 };
            int[] arr3 = new int[arr1.Length + arr2.Length];
    
            foreach (int i in arr1)
            {
                if (!arr2.Contains(i))
                {
                    int newlength = arr2.Length + 1;
                    Array.Resize<int>(ref arr2, newlength);
                    arr2[newlength - 1] = i;
                }
            }
    
            Array.Sort(arr2);
            Array.Resize<int>(ref arr3, arr2.Length);
            
            arr3 = arr2;
    
  • fred (unregistered) in reply to Quango

    CS != programming.

  • JMO (unregistered) in reply to Dogsworth

    Sounds like most permies at clients I've done work for. ;)

  • Bring Back TopCod3r (unregistered) in reply to Remy Porter
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Lost (unregistered)
    <?php $arr1 = array( "test", "test2", "test3", "test4", ); $arr2 = array( "test1", "test2", "test3", "test4", "test5", ); $arr3 = array_merge($arr1, $arr2); $arr3 = array_unique($arr3); ?>
  • tharpa (cs) in reply to Don
    Don:
    [Masters degree doesn't really mean much. I had someone working with me previously that had a masters in IT from one of the top UK universities. Couldn't even setup a docking station...

    Hmm. I guess you're right. I have an M.S. and 6 years programming experience. I don't even know what a docking station is, let alone be able to set one up (though I could probably figure it out without too much trouble). Isn't a docking station one of those things on Star Trek?

    I think this illustrates one of the risks of evaluating fellow programmers that we see here fairly often - one thinks that the information one uses every day is something that all programmers use every day, and/or is innate.

    I also don't like Atwood's article at http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2006/07/separating-programming-sheep-from-non-programming-goats.html. I can imagine a person with programming potential (but who's never seen a line of code before) who's never been taught about assignment, and certainly has never been taught about the perverse way that C-family programmers use the equals sign, who would just see the third line in the code there, would think it was an error and/or that the test givers were morons, and wouldn't be able to get beyond that unless they were given those critical pieces of information.

  • dkf (cs) in reply to Bring Back TopCod3r
    Bring Back TopCod3r:
    https://github.com/Mikkeren/FizzBuzzEnterpriseEdition/blob/master/src/main/java/com/seriouscompany/business/java/fizzbuzz/packagenamingpackage/impl/FizzBuzz.java
    Not enterprisey enough. Still too many pieces are hard-coded. The code needs to use some other configuration layer written in some other language, no, in XML, to stitch the pieces together from services published in JNDI or OSGi or something like that.

    I wish I was joking about this.

  • Xarthaneon the Unclear (unregistered)

    How is this not classified as a 'Tales of the Interview'?

  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL (unregistered)

    TRWTF is the noobs that think this is SO and post their own non-joke solutions to the problem mentioned in the article.

  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL (unregistered) in reply to Bring Back TopCod3r
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Zemm (cs) in reply to Don
    Don:
    I had someone working with me previously that had a masters in IT from one of the top UK universities. Couldn't even setup a docking station...

    I replaced a guy with a degree in Information Systems. First day he couldn't get his computer to work. It hadn't been plugged in yet. Then he couldn't write a SELECT query (from a single table). The mind boggles.

  • lolatu (unregistered) in reply to tharpa
    Comment held for moderation.
  • FizzBuzz (unregistered)
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            for (int x = 1; x <= 100; x++)
            {
                if (x%3 == 0 && x%5 == 0)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("fizzbuzz");
                }
                else if (x%3 == 0)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("fizz");
                }
                else if (x%5 == 0)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("buzz");
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(x);
                }
            }
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
    

    where's my price?

  • levbor (cs)

    So on one hand he is totally clueless, doesn't even know what a URL is. On the other hand, he manages to google some sort of answer and to use an IDE?

    Something is wrong here.

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to tharpa
    Comment held for moderation.
  • RandomGuy (unregistered) in reply to FizzBuzz
    FizzBuzz:
    where's my price?

    Sorry, you failed. Unless I failed to spot the joke in your comment.

  • CookbookChef (unregistered)

    Several years ago I was on the interview team for a large American Bank. We interviewed dozens of people a week. There were several "senior level developers" who missed every question we asked. Even very basic questions. It became so bad that we required each candidate to submit in writing the answers to five questions before they received an phone interview.

    We had two people submit the same answer to one of the questions. Including the typos. A quick online search of the question revealed the web site that provided the answer, which was not even correct. About half of the people we interviewed just copied and pasted the answers from the first few links in the search results.

  • SQLer (unregistered)

    I'm missing the "WTF"

    1. Interview process worked - filtered out the "bad" programmers
    2. "Bad" programmers are not really a "WTF" they exist, we all have to watch out for them...

    Unless this ended with "Avi hired him anyways..." it's not a WTF IMO.

  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL (unregistered) in reply to CookbookChef
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Rnd( (unregistered)

    Somewhat these articles help me feel better about my skills as student... Somethings I hear are bit scary, considering how much software we use...

    Still, I'm not entirely sure about my prospects on job market...

  • emaNrouY-Here (unregistered) in reply to Don
    Comment held for moderation.
  • jaybird (unregistered) in reply to ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL
    Comment held for moderation.
  • ArrivingRaptor (cs) in reply to ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    Bring Back TopCod3r:
    https://github.com/Mikkeren/FizzBuzzEnterpriseEdition/blob/master/src/main/java/com/seriouscompany/business/java/fizzbuzz/packagenamingpackage/impl/FizzBuzz.java
    You laugh, you lose. I lost it at the block of import statements.
    I lost it at reading "61 lines (52 sloc)".
  • ZoomST (unregistered) in reply to emaNrouY-Here
    Comment held for moderation.
  • mag (unregistered)

    what really sucks is I bet there were 100 applicants that could write the requested code, bu didnt make the top 5 like fred

  • AlliedMasterComputer (unregistered) in reply to levbor
    levbor:
    So on one hand he is totally clueless, doesn't even know what a URL is. On the other hand, he manages to google some sort of answer and to use an IDE?

    Something is wrong here.

    Several things are wrong...extreme cognitive dissonance being one of the biggest.

  • ZoomST (unregistered) in reply to Remy Porter
    Comment held for moderation.
  • drobnox (unregistered)

    LINQ (.Net 3.5+) for unique array merge:

    (new HashSet<int>(Array1.Union(Array2))).ToAray()
  • drobnox (unregistered) in reply to drobnox

    .toArray

  • drobnox (unregistered) in reply to drobnox
    .ToArray
  • Chelloveck (unregistered)

    I get it! TRWTF is an IDE using a font that doesn't distinguish 'l' from '1', right?

  • Evan (unregistered) in reply to tharpa
    Comment held for moderation.
  • flabdablet (cs) in reply to Remy Porter
    Remy Porter:
    My initial instinct was to say, "a fizzbuzz algorithm is way too easy for a coding test," but y'know what? Apparently I'm wrong.

    It's almost a one-liner in a number of different languages.

    C, for instance.

  • AnonymouseUser (unregistered)

    Never hire anyone who looks up coding problems on the Internet, that's oh so such a good idea. Everyone here knows everything by heart.

    And if the interviewer was so good, why didn't he spot the typo?

  • Calli Arcale (unregistered) in reply to levbor
    levbor:
    So on one hand he is totally clueless, doesn't even know what a URL is. On the other hand, he manages to google some sort of answer and to use an IDE?

    Something is wrong here.

    My mom is totally clueless when it comes to computers, and would not know what a URL is despite it having been explained to her. Yet she is able to use Google, and knows that you can type things into that field at the top of the window, just under the menus. She just uses the word "address" instead of "URL", which is what most people do. People who are more technically minded, like us, are happier calling it a URL, since that's the specific type of address that it is.

    Which means that telling candidates to visit a particular URL can indeed be useful for weeding out at least some of the posers.

  • Bananas (unregistered) in reply to ObiWayneKenobi
    ObiWayneKenobi:
    Although it makes you wonder, if the guy was project lead at his old company, COULD he actually code?
    After watching the guy's failed attempt at coding, why would you believe his claim to having been project lead?
  • tharpa (cs) in reply to Evan
    Evan:
    tharpa:
    I also don't like Atwood's article at http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2006/07/separating-programming-sheep-from-non-programming-goats.html. I can imagine a person with programming potential (but who's never seen a line of code before) who's never been taught about assignment, and certainly has never been taught about the perverse way that C-family programmers use the equals sign, who would just see the third line in the code there, would think it was an error and/or that the test givers were morons, and wouldn't be able to get beyond that unless they were given those critical pieces of information.
    To play devil's advocate for a second:

    If you're a hiring manager, do you want to hire someone who might have programming potential if you put in a lot of training, or do you want to decline and wait a bit longer until you get an applicant who can actually demonstrate some amount of programming proficiency already?

    The first could lead to some high rewards, yes. But it's also really high risk. Do you want to take that chance?

    If I understand your point correctly, it is that a test to separate potential programmers from non-potential programmers could have some legitimacy. I do not dispute this. My complaint was about using such a test that used the C-language perversion of the equals sign without an explanation. I would have been consistent in my view that it was an error, and none of the answers clearly addressed that possibility. Upon reading some of the comments to that article, there were quite a few other people who made the same point. Had the writers used a different assignment operator, like :=, or used "Let" syntax, it would have been a completely different question.

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