• kjordan2001 (unregistered)

    The ebay one seems almost like there were newline or breakline characters introduced into the part number.

  • Mattie F. (unregistered)

    I'm guessing the Haskell site is blocked because the 'all' at the end of the domain makes it look like some new version of Adderall.

    As for countries, I always put the most commonly used countries at the top of the list. Also, in this era of geolocation, is there any excuse for not moving the closest countries to the user to the top?

  • dru (unregistered)
    This is a balloon

    Well, what else would you use to visit the cloud?

  • (cs)
  • OldCoder (unregistered) in reply to Mattie F.
    Mattie F. :
    I'm guessing the Haskell site is blocked because the 'all' at the end of the domain makes it look like some new version of Adderall.

    As for countries, I always put the most commonly used countries at the top of the list. Also, in this era of geolocation, is there any excuse for not moving the closest countries to the user to the top?

    Actually, it also includes the substring 'oral'. This is more likely to trip alarm bells.

    I haven't found any others, but that doesn't mean there aren't any.

  • Jack (unregistered) in reply to ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    Pista:
    I live in a building which bears number 13-15. I've had a lot of fun getting bills addressed to number 13, number 15 and number 1315, but only a few were able to keep my address with 13-15. Good thing the postal services don't have problems delivering.
    I'm surprised you didn't get anything addressed to "-2".
    That's just the point. They send it, but he never gets it.
  • Ralph (unregistered)
    I was wondering what it meant to let Azure services access the server
    Don't. Just don't.

    Protip: anytime Microsoft gives you one of those messages asking if you want to do something, just let it. That's the fastest, and usually the only, way to get stuff to work.

    Thinking, wondering, deciding... you don't need to waste time on any of those things. Nobody else does.

  • (cs)
    chubertdev:
    Why not just do the most basic validation (contains the @ symbol, etc), but not "perfect" validation, then attempt to send the email, and if it fails, alert the user? Or even use an existing construct, like the System.Net.Mail.MailAddress class to see if it can be parsed, and let Microsoft worry about it.

    http://thedailywtf.com/Comments/Translate-Everything!.aspx?pg=3#430649

  • (cs)

    90% of forms with addresses should just use a textarea.

  • (cs)

    Lincoln obviously searched using a lowercase 3, and the listing has an uppercase 3.

  • A Non. E. Mouse (unregistered) in reply to ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    He missed mentioning the falsehood of "all addresses will be in strictly increasing or decreasing order along a geographic direction".
    I've seen this occur even here in 'Murica!!!! (Worcester, MA to be specific.)

    There's a small N/S road (I forget the name since it's been over 20 years since I've been there) where the house numbers on the East side of the road (starting from the South end) went something like: 51, 52, 53; then for unknown reasons: 63, 64, 65, 66; and then to make it more fun: 58, 59, 60. On the West side (starting again from the South end), the numbers were: 20, 19, 18, 17, .... I forget what the actual numbers were, but that was the gist of the numberings.

  • Mason Wheeler (unregistered) in reply to QJo
    Quango:
    Carrie:
    Sorted by value, not label, obviously.

    At least anyone looking for the UK will be used to scrolling to both U and G.

    And also B, for Britain, and sometimes E for England (or W for Wales and S for Scotland and N for Northern Ireland).

    We only do it to confuse foreigners and generate work for UI developers.

    Our postcode system was specifically designed to give developers who want to use regular expression a brain hemorrhage.

    ...and now you have three problems.

  • Chelloveck (unregistered) in reply to OldCoder
    OldCoder:
    Actually, it also includes the substring 'oral'. This is more likely to trip alarm bells.

    I haven't found any others, but that doesn't mean there aren't any.

    Back when my day job was for a printer manufacturer we were going to use the parallel port to send data in both directions. So I headed off to Google to search for information on the subject. The most relevant hit was censored by our web proxy under the category "alternative lifestyles". Oh, what must they have thought of me and my lust for information on the BI-directional parallel port?

  • (cs) in reply to A Non. E. Mouse
    A Non. E. Mouse:
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    He missed mentioning the falsehood of "all addresses will be in strictly increasing or decreasing order along a geographic direction".
    I've seen this occur even here in 'Murica!!!! (Worcester, MA to be specific.)

    There's a small N/S road (I forget the name since it's been over 20 years since I've been there) where the house numbers on the East side of the road (starting from the South end) went something like: 51, 52, 53; then for unknown reasons: 63, 64, 65, 66; and then to make it more fun: 58, 59, 60. On the West side (starting again from the South end), the numbers were: 20, 19, 18, 17, .... I forget what the actual numbers were, but that was the gist of the numberings.

    Don't even get me started on 290 East/West/North/South.

  • not an anon (unregistered) in reply to CigarDoug
    Comment held for moderation.
  • (cs) in reply to not an anon

    Don't forget about 8675309@mydomain.com

  • (cs) in reply to chubertdev
    chubertdev:
    Don't forget about 8675309@mydomain.com
    Don't forget about +@mydomain.com
  • ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL (unregistered) in reply to A Non. E. Mouse
    A Non. E. Mouse:
    There's a small N/S road (I forget the name since it's been over 20 years since I've been there) where the house numbers on the East side of the road (starting from the South end) went something like: 51, 52, 53;
    In Bryan and College Station, Texas, the main drag Texas Avenue resets its numbering as it crosses the boundary, from around 4400S to 100S (there is no North Texas Avenue in College Station). And I'm not entirely certain, but from playing with Google Maps, it seems that one side of the road changes a block or two before the other side.

    So you can't even be sure that a building across the street has a related address. Of course this gets more fun in a metropolitan area that crosses a more important boundary, such as US 71 / State Line Ave. in Texarkana. Nnot only are the opposite sides out of sync, they don't even change at the same rate!

  • anonymous (unregistered) in reply to not an anon
    Comment held for moderation.
  • not an anon (unregistered) in reply to anonymous
    Comment held for moderation.
  • (cs) in reply to not an anon
    not an anon:
    anonymous:
    not an anon:
    CigarDoug:
    ip-guru:
    at least it is not as impossible to validate as an email address :-)
    Bah. Does string have an @ symbol? Is there at least one letter on the left and the right of the @ symbol? Then it is a valid email address.

    To complete your order, we will send you a confirmation email. Within that email is a link you must click, or a number you must type in.

    If you give me a bad email address, you can't complete the order.

    What else do I need to validate?

    CAPTCHA: facilisis. This email-can't-be-validated meme is facilisis.

    So, 'webmaster@4chan.com' is not a valid email address? Or are you saying 'somewhere on the left and right', as opposed to 'immediately on the left and right'?
    He meant "character", not "letter".
    Say what you mean, not what you say?

    He wrote "Is there at least one letter on the left and the right of the @ symbol?"

    So he clearly was not writing about the characters 'immediately on the left and right'.

    Because there can be at most one character immediately on the left and at most one immediately on the right of the @ symbol.

    Addendum (2014-05-09 17:06): "So he clearly was not writing about the characters ..." -> "So he clearly was not only writing about the characters"

  • (cs)

    Street numbers and other nonsense.

    Next to my house there is a road (McCoy) that starts out in Campbell, goes through San Jose, and ends up in Saratoga. Throughout it retains the name, but the numbers are specific to the particular town (they have different "origins". To complicate things further the border sometimes goes through the middle of the street, so you have one side in one town (with its numbers) and the other side in another town (with different numbers). It is a wonder to drive down and see:

    1. Different numbers on either side of the street
    2. Numbers jump around
    3. Street signs with different formats (each city has their own design)
    4. At the same intersection, street signs on different corners looking completely different.

    I pity the poor postman who has to deliver this route. It must be trying. Good luck with a new package company.

    In other places things are a bit more sane. My brother's address is 690 (street name). This is 6.9 miles from the start of the road. Pretty easy.

  • (cs) in reply to Nancy Reagan
    Nancy Reagan:
    Just say no.

    Friends don't let friends use Haskell.

    Haskell. Not even once.

    Best comment ever.

  • (cs) in reply to herby
    herby:
    Street numbers and other nonsense.

    Next to my house there is a road (McCoy) that starts out in Campbell, goes through San Jose, and ends up in Saratoga. Throughout it retains the name, but the numbers are specific to the particular town (they have different "origins". To complicate things further the border sometimes goes through the middle of the street, so you have one side in one town (with its numbers) and the other side in another town (with different numbers). It is a wonder to drive down and see:

    1. Different numbers on either side of the street
    2. Numbers jump around
    3. Street signs with different formats (each city has their own design)
    4. At the same intersection, street signs on different corners looking completely different.

    I pity the poor postman who has to deliver this route. It must be trying. Good luck with a new package company.

    In other places things are a bit more sane. My brother's address is 690 (street name). This is 6.9 miles from the start of the road. Pretty easy.

    Not exactly the end of the world. I'd assume that after a week or even a month, the postman would have a routine and adjust to the format.

    And as for someone new to the area finding a location, they could just use Google Maps, and at worst, ask for close cross street(s).

    It does seem quite funny, and I'd definitely chuckle at it, but there are ways to deal with it.

  • saluto (unregistered) in reply to operagost
    operagost:
    It wasn't created in China (like chow mein), but it was created by Chinese chefs, so I'd call it "Chinese".
    I vote for Chinesque.
  • "Cloud"man (unregistered) in reply to dru
    dru:
    This is a balloon

    Well, what else would you use to visit my butt?

    I mean...

  • (cs) in reply to Jay
    Jay:
    Element14 (aka Farnell) Oz-edition is very enterprisey indeed, if enterprisey means "complete morons".
    Farnell:
    You have an outstanding backorder with us for 2291620 x1 Beaglebone Black on our reference 14417571

    We have been advised that we cannot be supplied with these and offer 2401441 with identical specifications as an alternative. Your back order for 2291620 has had to be cancelled, however please feel free to place a new order for our identical alternative.

    Price for the "identical alternative" (i.e. same goods with a different stocking number) was $2.16 more than the original. I'd ordered one (1) of them. I am quite sure it would have cost them more than $2.16 to avoid simply fulfilling the back order when stock became available.

    Farnell has always been a bit of a supplier of last resort for me. I don't enjoy anything at all about dealing with them except for their enormous product range - they're quite often the only place I can find that has what I need.

  • Frank (unregistered) in reply to Pista

    At least you didn't get a -2. I once lived in a building with the number 59-2, and occasionally some mails from one company have their recipient address reading "building 57".

    Despite that, our postal service managed to deliver them to me sometimes, perhaps they have dealt with that situation before, and used the room number to find the correct building.

    We have buildings numbered 1 through 59, and for those in the range 50 through 59, they all have a trailing number ranging from 1 to 4, for 4 independent buildings(Yes, four independent buildings actually share a major number). If you live on the third floor of building 59-1, your room number will be like 31x, and for those in building 59-2, it'll be 32x.

    The number of the building have changed to 59-B now, I'm curious if that company started sending mails to those living in "building 4E" or "building NaN" now.

  • George Branwortz (unregistered) in reply to Chelloveck
    Chelloveck:
    OldCoder:
    Actually, it also includes the substring 'oral'. This is more likely to trip alarm bells.

    I haven't found any others, but that doesn't mean there aren't any.

    Back when my day job was for a printer manufacturer we were going to use the parallel port to send data in both directions. So I headed off to Google to search for information on the subject. The most relevant hit was censored by our web proxy under the category "alternative lifestyles". Oh, what must they have thought of me and my lust for information on the BI-directional parallel port?

    A similar thing happened to a friend before, while searching for a "gender changer" adapter.

  • (cs) in reply to Pista
    Pista:
    In brief, it's not just programmers who mess up addresses.
    They'd get it right if they were prefixed with “0x”…
  • Norman Diamond (unregistered) in reply to not an anon
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Norman Diamond (unregistered) in reply to ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    In Japan, with its already different from most of the world block system,
    though oddly not different from the world's most populus country and a few other Asian countries,
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    addresses within a block are not necessarily in any particular order. And if a new address gets added to a block, they'll just use the next available number, regardless of relative position.
    That I haven't seen. If a big old lot now has 2 or 3 or 4 buildings on it, the lot still has its lot number, and you have to write the building name in between the lot number and the room or floor number. The lot numbers still follow an increasing sequence one direction or the other around the block, except where redevelopment merged some blocks and now an old block number only applies to part of the new block. Both of these rules apply to the building where I work; it's one of two 10-story buildings on the lot, and adjacent is a building of around 30 stories occupying what used to be part of this block and some nearby blocks.
  • (cs) in reply to no laughing matter
    no laughing matter:
    He wrote "Is there at least one letter on the left and the right of the @ symbol?"

    So he clearly was not writing about the characters 'immediately on the left and right'.

    Because there can be at most one character immediately on the left and at most one immediately on the right of the @ symbol.

    Please copy that to me at .@.
  • Norman Diamond (unregistered) in reply to ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    So you can't even be sure that a building across the street has a related address.
    No kidding. The building across the street might be in a different country.
  • (cs) in reply to George Branwortz
    George Branwortz:
    Chelloveck:
    OldCoder:
    Actually, it also includes the substring 'oral'. This is more likely to trip alarm bells.

    I haven't found any others, but that doesn't mean there aren't any.

    Back when my day job was for a printer manufacturer we were going to use the parallel port to send data in both directions. So I headed off to Google to search for information on the subject. The most relevant hit was censored by our web proxy under the category "alternative lifestyles". Oh, what must they have thought of me and my lust for information on the BI-directional parallel port?

    A similar thing happened to a friend before, while searching for a "gender changer" adapter.

    There was the case where a visiting lecturer in x-ray crystallography needed to bone up on her subject before delivering her presentation to a certain class in a university, so asked for access to the computer network for an hour or so beforehand. When she delivered the lecture, she was disturbed by the chorus of titters and sniggers, which were apparently sufficient to disrupt her talk. Clearly she wanted to know what was the cause of this, so she had a word with the person organising the talk. She was greeted coldly by the organiser, who informed her in no uncertain terms that her browsing was unacceptable, and as a result she would no longer be welcome to lecture there. As angry and confused as you'd expect, she demanded an answer as to what she was supposed to have done. Turns out that there wasn't actually a filter on the internet, but merely a program that captured the URLs, interrogated them for unacceptable words, and reported them to a file which was, apparently, monitored by an employee of the university who had been drawn from the ranks of the students. What had happened was that her browsing for "x-ray crystallography" had set of an alert that filtered on URLs containing "x-ra" (for "x-rated"). The monitor was so amused that the visiting lecturer wanted an hour before the lecture to browse x-rated websites he told all his fellow-students, and by the time the lecture had started ... well you get the gist.

  • (cs) in reply to Norman Diamond
    Norman Diamond:
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    In Japan, with its already different from most of the world block system,
    though oddly not different from the world's most populus country and a few other Asian countries,
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    addresses within a block are not necessarily in any particular order. And if a new address gets added to a block, they'll just use the next available number, regardless of relative position.
    That I haven't seen. If a big old lot now has 2 or 3 or 4 buildings on it, the lot still has its lot number, and you have to write the building name in between the lot number and the room or floor number. The lot numbers still follow an increasing sequence one direction or the other around the block, except where redevelopment merged some blocks and now an old block number only applies to part of the new block. Both of these rules apply to the building where I work; it's one of two 10-story buildings on the lot, and adjacent is a building of around 30 stories occupying what used to be part of this block and some nearby blocks.

    What happens in Britain is that "a, b" etc. get added to the buildings in the middle. So if someone builds a new place on the waste land between 12 and 14, it tends to get numbered "12a". You also find that if a house gets redeveloped and split up into flats (that's "apartments" to the non-English-speakers), those individual flats get numbered with letters, e.g. 42 gets split up into 42a, 42b, 42c, etc. I've never seen a building given a number which is out of sequence.

    In extreme cases, particularly in the case of new builds, the buildings are completely renumbered. I bought a new flat which was number 30 in the new close. Between buying it and moving in, it was decided that another 6 houses would be added to the close, at the small end (this was a close where the numbers went incrementally round from one end to the other, as opposed to being odd on one side and even on the other -- such is the way of irregularly-shaped streets in residential developments in semi-rural suburbia).

    So, when I moved in, my no 30 had suddenly become no. 37. 37? I thought there were only 6 houses added. Well yes, that's the case, but they also took the opportunity during the renumbering of removing no. 13 as they had found they couldn't sell a domestic dwelling with that number.

  • Tony (unregistered)

    I used to live at 11 Warwick court, Warwick Road. That building having been built in the 60's by demolishing a couple of houses on the end of Warwick road. As a result 11 Warwick Road also existed. On the same postcode.

    I regularly swapped mail with the guy at Warwick road. Some companies seemed completely incapable of understanding that they were different - their address software only understanding number + street not number + building + street.

    Of note was Google maps insisted the address didn't exist, presumably because of the postcode clash.

  • anonymous coward (unregistered) in reply to Nancy Reagan

    Nor the generic version, Haskelphoral flavored with Xylitol.

  • ph (unregistered) in reply to ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    >The number of buildings is the difference between the highest and lowest building numbers

    In Peru, they like to start numbering each new block from the next hundred, so the house numbers go like 342, 343, 400, 401, ...

    Actually this makes a lot of sense as the size of blocks is much more predictable than the size of houses along the street.

  • Victor Yugo (unregistered) in reply to Matt Westwood
    Matt Westwood:
    Nancy Reagan:
    Just say no.

    Friends don't let friends use Haskell.

    Haskell. Not even once.

    Best comment ever.

    This is your brain (an egg) This is Haskell (a frying pan) This is your brain on Haskell (The identity of the application of the egg monad to the frying pan monad)

    Any questions?

  • Jay (unregistered) in reply to Matt Westwood
    Matt Westwood:
    Turns out that there wasn't actually a filter on the internet, but merely a program that captured the URLs, interrogated them for unacceptable words, and reported them to a file which was, apparently, monitored by an employee of the university who had been drawn from the ranks of the students. What had happened was that her browsing for "x-ray crystallography" had set of an alert that filtered on URLs containing "x-ra" (for "x-rated"). The monitor was so amused that the visiting lecturer wanted an hour before the lecture to browse x-rated websites he told all his fellow-students, and by the time the lecture had started ... well you get the gist.
    Google has decided that I like looking a picture of naked and mostly naked women, which is quite true but a but disctracting when I'm looking for something else.

    Of course entering "hot male female china" when looking for high-temperature connectors is a bad idea, but for "spaghetti tubing"?

    Spaghetti tubing is used in equipment to bundle & protect wiring; turns out that very thin shoulder straps on women's clothing is also called spaghetti (strap, not tubing but anyway).

    "No I don't know why loads of pictures of women just appeared." At least they were dressed, I suppose.

    Seems Google now knows the difference; "spaghetti tubing" is now much less interesting than "spaghetti strap".

  • Jay (unregistered) in reply to flabdablet
    flabdablet:
    Jay:
    Element14 (aka Farnell) Oz-edition is very enterprisey indeed, if enterprisey means "complete morons".
    Farnell:
    You have an outstanding backorder with us for 2291620 x1 Beaglebone Black on our reference 14417571

    We have been advised that we cannot be supplied with these and offer 2401441 with identical specifications as an alternative. Your back order for 2291620 has had to be cancelled, however please feel free to place a new order for our identical alternative.

    Price for the "identical alternative" (i.e. same goods with a different stocking number) was $2.16 more than the original. I'd ordered one (1) of them. I am quite sure it would have cost them more than $2.16 to avoid simply fulfilling the back order when stock became available.

    Farnell has always been a bit of a supplier of last resort for me. I don't enjoy anything at all about dealing with them except for their enormous product range - they're quite often the only place I can find that has what I need.

    Sounds about right.

    I'm surprised they didn't bill your credit card for the difference along with a cancellation fee for the original order, plus an administrative charge for the new one.

  • (cs) in reply to ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    The block system itself (allocating addresses to blocks between streets, rather than along a street) is alien to most people on this planet, but in addition to Japan, I am aware that at least some US army bases use a block system.

    Doesn't Manhattan Island use the block numbering system too?

    Here in Australia it is common outside the cities to use "rural numbering" which is simply 10s of metres from the "main road" to the driveway. These numberings still respect odd/even: each property is going to have more than 20 metres of road frontage, so there's no real chance of overlap. My brother-in-law lives at 198 "Example" Road, so you know it is exactly 1.98km until you reach his letterbox!

    Two of my friends had the exact same mailing address, save their names, despite living about 50km from each other, since they were on a "mail service". So "Mr Jones, MS 1234, Sometown 4321" and "Mr Smith, MS 1234, Sometown 4321" never got each other's mail, since the deliverer knew who lived at each address.

    Finally, normally an "A" number is between successive numbers, like 10, 10A, 12. Except when it is 2A or 1A, which could be on the other direction. The highest letter I know of is H, where a large block was subdivided into eight houses. 11A is probably the most common "A" number, where there is a gap for 13. But 13 is not completely excluded...

  • andyn (unregistered)

    TRWTF is that there is a person who willingly uses Crestron products.

    Their SIMPL+ IDE takes 5 minutes to start. Programming is done in a C-like language that does away with inconveniences such as pointers and character constants and then slaps on useless functionality like operator overloading. The end result is then compiled into C#.

    Oh, did I mention that they claim copyright over all software written for their products?

  • psuedonymous (unregistered)

    Farnell: Stupid error ACTUALLY means: the product you have tried to buy was a pre-listing (i.e. not on sale yet), the listed price is just to let you know how much it will be once it is on sale. Not omitting the 'add to cart' button is a bit of Enterprisy WTF though, with the 'no price' error a hack to prevent people buying things that are not on sale yet.

    Ebay: Ebay, unless you futz with the settings, rigidly enforces regioning. If you were originally looking at a listing in another region (e.g. US) that only listed locations in that region as acceptable shipping destinations, and then searched in your local region homepage (e.g. UK) for that exact listing, it will not display by default. The 'more items related' area will show listings from outside your region but that DO allow shipping to you (e.g. EU with explicit allowance for shipping to UK), but not listings outside your region that do not explicitly allow shipping to the region you're in. Useful system, stupid interface.

  • (cs) in reply to ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL
    ¯\(°_o)/¯ I DUNNO LOL:
    In Japan, with its already different from most of the world block system, addresses within a block are not necessarily in any particular order.

    Actually, addresses within a block are in chronological order of when the building permit was issued.

    And if a new address gets added to a block, they'll just use the next available number, regardless of relative position.

    ...thus the above result.

  • (cs) in reply to Quango
    Quango:
    Great Britain != UK
    Let's face it, the Brits (or should that be "United Subjects"?) aren't exactly consistent in this regard either. I think one of the very few times the country is called "United Kingdom" is when it's also called "Royaume-Uni", in other words: during Eurovision.

    Your number plates say "GB". At the Olympics, you call yourselves "Team GB". The language setting is en_GB", not "en_UK". In fact, everything is about "British", "Visit Britain", and so on.

    Arguably, this is the same issue that the Americans have, because there there's not really an adjective for "UK", just as there isn't one for "USA". But at least the Americans are consistent in the use of "US".

  • (cs) in reply to True Hood
    True Hood:
    Obligatory: http://www.mjt.me.uk/posts/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-addresses/
    Still doesn't include Florence (Tuscany, Italy) where they have two different numbering systems in the same street. They use so-called black and red numbers.
  • Hasse de great (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • Carrie (unregistered) in reply to Severity One
    Severity One:
    Quango:
    Great Britain != UK
    Let's face it, the Brits (or should that be "United Subjects"?) aren't exactly consistent in this regard either. I think one of the very few times the country is called "United Kingdom" is when it's also called "Royaume-Uni", in other words: during Eurovision.

    Your number plates say "GB". At the Olympics, you call yourselves "Team GB". The language setting is en_GB", not "en_UK". In fact, everything is about "British", "Visit Britain", and so on.

    Arguably, this is the same issue that the Americans have, because there there's not really an adjective for "UK", just as there isn't one for "USA". But at least the Americans are consistent in the use of "US".

    We do it especially for your benefit. American- (or to coin a more accurate adjective, USAlien-) baiting is one of our national sports.

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