• Ger (unregistered)

    Actually, russians are not the guys you go for high-level, easy to read, commercial software, nor you go to them for UI. But in case you need some crazy alghoritms... well, welcome to Eastern Europe.

  • Alargule (unregistered)

    In Soviet Russia, code writes YOU!

  • frits (cs)

    American managers will believe any line of baloney...What a Country!

  • Alan (unregistered)

    The bit where the stock codes fell down the screen and you had to rotate them in order to buy or sell was cool.

  • KattMan (cs)

    Yeah the team was loyal and trustworthy all right. You just have to make sure you know who they are loyal to.

  • Ilyak (unregistered)

    The story ending suggests that they ought to fail again, having not learned anything?

  • Dmitri... errr... Dmitry (unregistered)

    Maybe his name was Dmitry Dmitri?

  • Ilyak (unregistered)

    His name was probably Дмитрий.

  • Harold von Finklestein (unregistered)
    Upon first glance, the Brett was impressed with the look of the UI screens. The code, on the other hand, left little to be desired.

    I don't think it means what you think it does.

  • java.lang.Chris; (cs)

    One of the real WTFs: they didn't just add a script to CVS that called dos2unix on source files when they were committed. CVS provides a hook for pre-commit tasks for a reason.

  • Ilyak (unregistered)

    Err, Дмитрий.

  • Aaron (cs)

    So evidently this story is from Brett's POV, and Brett was hired after they had acquired the product. Which makes the entire first section of this story a complete fabrication.

    But I guess it's OK, as long as it pokes fun at managers and executives.

  • Ru (unregistered) in reply to Harold von Finklestein
    Harold von Finklestein:
    Upon first glance, the Brett was impressed with the look of the UI screens. The code, on the other hand, left little to be desired.

    I don't think it means what you think it does.

    That's because you're probably the sort of person who 'could care less'.

  • Cecil (unregistered) in reply to Ru

    I know it peaked your interest, but for all intensive purposes isn't it just a mute point?

  • SR (unregistered) in reply to Aaron
    Aaron:
    So evidently this story is from Brett's POV, and Brett was hired after they had acquired the product. Which makes the entire first section of this story a complete fabrication.

    But I guess it's OK, as long as it pokes fun at managers and executives.

    That's fine by me.

  • highphilosopher (unregistered) in reply to Ru
    Ru:
    Harold von Finklestein:
    Upon first glance, the Brett was impressed with the look of the UI screens. The code, on the other hand, left little to be desired.

    I don't think it means what you think it does.

    That's because you're probably the sort of person who 'could care less'.

    Or maybe you're just the kind of person who 'doesn't want to get involved'.

  • SR (unregistered) in reply to Cecil
    Cecil:
    I know it peaked your interest, but for all intensive purposes isn't it just a mute point?

    There's a special level of Hell for cruel posters of Internet comments. You're a shoe-in for that.

  • Peter (unregistered) in reply to Alan
    Alan:
    The bit where the stock codes fell down the screen and you had to rotate them in order to buy or sell was cool.

    Win.

  • KattMan (cs) in reply to Ru
    Ru:
    Harold von Finklestein:
    Upon first glance, the Brett was impressed with the look of the UI screens. The code, on the other hand, left little to be desired.

    I don't think it means what you think it does.

    That's because you're probably the sort of person who 'could care less'.

    Dr. Finklestien is correct, If it left little to be desired then it had everything in it, or maybe he is wrong, because it did have the ability to back date a buy and make you tons of money.

    As for the 'could care less', this comes from "As if I could care less', meaning that you can't care less. Other sources of this give it a Yiddish etymology in which they tend to say the opposite of what they mean in order to enhance the idiocy of the comment.

  • Dignissim (unregistered) in reply to Harold von Finklestein
    Harold von Finklestein:
    Upon first glance, the Brett was impressed with the look of the UI screens. The code, on the other hand, left little to be desired.

    I don't think it means what you think it does.

    Don't question The Brett's wisdom. If The Brett says the opposite of what he means, it is because The Brett wants to expose you as a whiner. You have fallen right into his clever trap.

  • pjt33 (cs) in reply to Cecil
    Cecil:
    I no it peaked your interest, but for all intensive purposes isn't it just a mute point?
    FTFY.
  • dr memals (unregistered) in reply to KattMan
    KattMan:
    Ru:
    Harold von Finklestein:
    Upon first glance, the Brett was impressed with the look of the UI screens. The code, on the other hand, left little to be desired.

    I don't think it means what you think it does.

    That's because you're probably the sort of person who 'could care less'.

    Dr. Finklestien is correct, If it left little to be desired then it had everything in it, or maybe he is wrong, because it did have the ability to back date a buy and make you tons of money.

    As for the 'could care less', this comes from "As if I could care less', meaning that you can't care less. Other sources of this give it a Yiddish etymology in which they tend to say the opposite of what they mean in order to enhance the idiocy of the comment.

    In my country we call that "Sarcasm"

  • Harold von Finklestein (unregistered) in reply to KattMan
    KattMan:
    Dr. Finklestien is correct, If it left little to be desired then it had everything in it, or maybe he is wrong, because it did have the ability to back date a buy and make you tons of money.
    While others might be vexed, carefully dissecting errors in the articles is surely a tradition by now. For what it's worth, now that I think of it it's in all likelihood a simple case of a missing "a".
    As for the 'could care less', this comes from "As if I could care less', meaning that you can't care less. Other sources of this give it a Yiddish etymology in which they tend to say the opposite of what they mean in order to enhance the idiocy of the comment.
    I wasn't aware of this particular explanation, and yet it makes the most sese of them all. Many thanks.

    PS: How did you know I'm a doctor, anyway?

  • cdosrun (cs) in reply to pjt33
    pjt33:
    Cecil:
    I no it peaked you're interest, but for all intensive purposes isn't it just a mute point?
    FTFY.

    Yeah, I know it's irrevelant, but that begs the question, aren't most comments?

  • Plz Send Me The Code (unregistered) in reply to dr memals
    dr memals:
    KattMan:
    Ru:
    Harold von Finklestein:
    Upon first glance, the Brett was impressed with the look of the UI screens. The code, on the other hand, left little to be desired.

    I don't think it means what you think it does.

    That's because you're probably the sort of person who 'could care less'.

    Dr. Finklestien is correct, If it left little to be desired then it had everything in it, or maybe he is wrong, because it did have the ability to back date a buy and make you tons of money.

    As for the 'could care less', this comes from "As if I could care less', meaning that you can't care less. Other sources of this give it a Yiddish etymology in which they tend to say the opposite of what they mean in order to enhance the idiocy of the comment.

    In my country we call that "Sarcasm"

    Wow, you're so clever.

  • again! (unregistered) in reply to cdosrun
    cdosrun:
    pjt33:
    Cecil:
    I no it peaked you're interest, but four all intensive purposes isn't it just a mute point?
    FTFY.

    Yeah, I know it's irrevelant, but that begs the question, aren't most comments?

    more FTFY!

  • md5sum (cs) in reply to cdosrun
    cdosrun:
    pjt33:
    Cecil:
    I know it piqued your interest, but for all intents and purposes isn't it just a mute point?
    FTFY.

    Yeah, I know it's irrevelant, but that begs the question, aren't most comments?

    FTFY all... let's just go and fix the real problem, not the words around it...

  • Alexander Temerev (unregistered)

    Normally, when you write forex trading systems, you sign tons of NDAs and other legalese which can get you literally destroyed (or worse) if you even try thinking of such a trick.

    Disclaimer: I am writing trading systems for a living, I am Russian, and my name is not Dmitri.

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to md5sum
    md5sum:
    cdosrun:
    pjt33:
    Cecil:
    I know it piqued your interest, but for all intents and purposes isn't it just a moot point?
    FTFY.

    Yeah, I know it's irrevelant, but that begs the question, aren't most comments?

    FTFY all... let's just go and fix the real problem, not the words around it...

    No, you missed one.

  • Yardik (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • md5sum (cs) in reply to Anon
    Anon:
    md5sum:
    cdosrun:
    pjt33:
    Cecil:
    I know it piqued your interest, but for all intents and purposes isn't it just a moot point?
    FTFY.

    Yeah, I know it's irrevelant, but that begs the question, aren't most comments?

    FTFY all... let's just go and fix the real problem, not the words around it...

    No, you missed one.

    Ah, damn... well, I was closer than the rest of these fools :P

  • Anon (unregistered) in reply to Alexander Temerev
    Alexander Temerev:
    Normally, when you write forex trading systems, you sign tons of NDAs and other legalese which can get you literally destroyed (or worse) if you even try thinking of such a trick.

    Disclaimer: I am writing trading systems for a living, I am Russian, and my name is not Dmitri.

    Well, you see, that's why it's almost a perfect crime. Sure the company could press charges or sue him into oblivion, but to do so would show everybody how incompetent they are. Not good for a company that wants people to trust them with their money. If Dmitri got away with it, he would have been rich. If he get's caught (which he did), it's quietly swept under the rug and he's let go to try it again with a different company.

  • The names have been changed to protect the innocent (unregistered)

    Wonder if Kaspersky is feeding intelligence to the Russian Maf.., sorry, Government.

  • oldami (unregistered) in reply to Harold von Finklestein
    Harold von Finklestein:
    Upon first glance, the Brett was impressed with the look of the UI screens. The code, on the other hand, left little to be desired.

    I don't think it means what you think it does.

    Inconceivable!

  • Quirkafleeg (unregistered) in reply to KattMan
    KattMan:
    As for the 'could care less', this comes from "As if I could care less', meaning that you can't care less.
    ⇒ “couldn't care less”.
  • BBT (unregistered) in reply to md5sum
    md5sum:
    Anon:
    md5sum:
    cdosrun:
    pjt33:
    Cecil:
    I know it piqued your interest, but for all intents and purposes isn't it just a moot point?
    FTFY.

    Yeah, I know it's irrevelant, but that begs the question, aren't most comments?

    FTFY all... let's just go and fix the real problem, not the words around it...

    No, you missed one.

    Ah, damn... well, I was closer than the rest of these fools :P

    Well, that might makes you the biggest fool, since all the other "fools" were intentionally adding mistakes.

    The "intensive purposes" mixup is not so bad. Yeah, "intents and purposes" is correct, but essentially it's saying "purposes and purposes". At least "intensive purposes" makes sense and isn't redundant.

  • frits (cs) in reply to md5sum

    Three layers of funny surrounded by three layers of clueless.

  • Anonymous (unregistered) in reply to BBT
    BBT:
    The "intensive purposes" mixup is not so bad. Yeah, "intents and purposes" is correct, but essentially it's saying "purposes and purposes". At least "intensive purposes" makes sense and isn't redundant.
    OK, I'll remember that - it's OK to be wrong as long as BBT gives it his seal of approval. I was wondering, is it OK for me to put an extra a in "you God-damn reatard"? Thanks!
  • Mr Grumpy (unregistered)
    Comment held for moderation.
  • NightDweller (cs) in reply to Harold von Finklestein
    Harold von Finklestein:
    Upon first glance, the Brett was impressed with the look of the UI screens. The code, on the other hand, left little to be desired.

    I do not think it means what you think it means.

    FTFY

  • ounos (cs) in reply to cdosrun
    cdosrun:
    pjt33:
    Cecil:
    I no it peaked you're interest, but for all intensive purposes isn't it just a mute point?
    FTFY.

    Yeah, I know it's irrevelant, but that begs the question, aren't most comments?

    You are a welcomed addition to the club of "I don't know what begging the question even means but I see no problem using it as I see fit". (I would add a helpful link to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Begging_the_question but some software drone in between thinks it is spam).

  • amischiefr (cs) in reply to Ger
    Alex:
    Well, kind of. There’s a second team working out of a satellite office. Labor over there is cheap, good quality, and, most importantly, totally trustworthy. It’s not in Moscow, though.
    Ahh yes, India. Where labor is cheap and the code is... well, ok not so good a quality. Maybe it's not India, maybe its Nigeria. I hear they have some good talent over there.
  • frits (cs)

    This article reeks of BS and xenophobia.

  • Andrew (unregistered)

    So anyway, what sort of cars were they selling through the auto-trading system?

  • lolwtf (cs)

    Was the code preceded by a comment "maybe I needing this later"?

  • John (unregistered) in reply to frits
    frits:
    This article reeks of BS and xenophobia.

    Why, because the Russians are the antagonists? I admit it's very James Bond. Seeing as the vast majority of WTFs are American, with the occasional Brit it suggests a nice balance it's not only us that are crap.

    I also don't see why you can claim it's BS. I've always joked about messing up the rounding when it comes to VAT in our invoicing system (It could earn me a cool £120 per year). It's just that a bunch of guys who could write [bad] code decided to implement their crazy scheme.

  • Vlad Patryshev (unregistered)

    So, after encountering one scoundrels and 6 idiots, the company decided that Russians are no gooNo d.

    Good reminder for me, who on the daily basis has been trying to refactor the code from our Chinese colleagues - yes, thousands-line methods, copy-paste, no refactoring, just commenting out; global variables everywhere... so what?

    No, I am not defending all the crooks and idiots in Moscow; there's plenty. But if you look around, how many companies have tons of great programmers over there, in Russia; if you look at, hmm, the best Java/Scala IDE, if you check out where exactly the best anti-virus software is being produced... oh, whatever. Sorry for interrupting.

  • RBoy (unregistered) in reply to Alan
    Alan:
    The bit where the stock codes fell down the screen and you had to rotate them in order to buy or sell was cool.

    You win a satchel of internets.

  • Yardik (unregistered)

    The article did smack of a bit of 'cliche corrupt russian' stereotype... Oh well, entertaining read none the less.

    Moo.

  • Zylon (cs)

    This DailyWTF left little to be desired.

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