• (cs) in reply to Eduardo Habkost
    Eduardo Habkost:
    (taken on 2008-01-06 from a building in São Paulo)

    My friend probably has a time machine, because he has published this picture on December 18th, 2007. Before it was taken!

    No, that's a new picture, only traffic hasn't moved in between.

  • Zygo (unregistered) in reply to Fant
    Fant:
    The GNU/Linux /bin/true as true.c: http://www.koders.com/c/fidDF83F838AA5D91F9B07D35DD6353BCA20BD2B48B.aspx?s=md5

    I find the Solaris solution rather elegant :-)

    Compare with busybox, which shares a single copyright message across multiple Unix command-line utilities (well, OK, "false" then):

    http://www.koders.com/c/fid863125A971F14C752FE1CF94BBFCC1F7E3EE58A6.aspx?s=busybox

  • Christophe (unregistered) in reply to hallo.amt
    hallo.amt:
    You know, there is also a program called false

    That can't be true!!!

  • Eric (unregistered)

    There's a famous story about an IBM program called iefbr14. It was basically the same as /bin/true. It just returns, which one the IBM S/360 was the instruction "b r14" (branch register 14, register 14 contained the return address for the subroutine). One instruction, and it had a bug. Forgot to set the return code. Fix doubled the size of the program. And I think the original version of the fix had other bugs as well.

  • eryn (unregistered) in reply to TGV
    TGV:
    Eduardo Habkost:
    (taken on 2008-01-06 from a building in São Paulo)

    My friend probably has a time machine, because he has published this picture on December 18th, 2007. Before it was taken!

    No, that's a new picture, only traffic hasn't moved in between.

    i call bullshit on the whole thing, they only black and white cars, it's probably a movie shoot for some commercial, u just can't see the crew, used to work in the industry as a student, saw this type of thing all the time...

  • Jon (unregistered)

    So isn't this a time warner WTF? and a TDWTF for saying it's a comcast WTF?

  • CSM (unregistered) in reply to SomeCoder

    [quote user="SomeCoder In America, you aren't allowed to enter an intersection unless you can clear it, period. The left turn yield on green means that you can enter it and wait for traffic or until the light turns yellow to clear but you still must be able to clear it.

    99% of Americans (and especially in the state where I live) don't understand that you aren't supposed to enter an intersection that you can't clear. It's really irritating.[/quote]

    What is really irritating is when I follow the rules and stop before the intersection when there is no way I can make it through although the light is green, and jackasses behind me are actually honking at me for NOT entering an intersection that I can't get out of. One time a person behind me actually went around me and got stuck in the intersection, blocking traffic, but didn't seem to realize how much of a moron he was, and acted like it was the proper thing i should have done. Oh, if only I had sith lightning at my fingertips...

  • v.dog (unregistered)

    Version 0.1

    bash-2.05$ cat /bin/true bash-2.05$
    I'm sure you can guess the rest.

  • Ilyak (unregistered)

    Trafic picture is scary! That's a true deadlock in hardware!

  • ais523 (unregistered) in reply to mare
    mare:
    If I understand this correctly, those yellow diamonds in the intersection mean that you're not allowed to stop in the middle of it? And you have to wait before the intersection for the oncoming traffic to clear? (I'm serious, I've never seen them before and the first thing that turns up on google for "yellow diamonds intersection" is this very page :D)
    In the UK, they mean that you can't enter the intersection unless your exit is clear; however, you can enter the box if your exit is clear but a stream of traffic is preventing you actually getting to it.
  • Brazilian Guy (unregistered) in reply to eryn
    eryn:
    i call bullshit on the whole thing, they only black and white cars, it's probably a movie shoot for some commercial, u just can't see the crew, used to work in the industry as a student, saw this type of thing all the time...

    Being a Brazilian myself and living abroad right now, I can say that when I saw the picture, even before reading any text, my first thought was "That looks just like Brazil". From my point of view it's not bullshit at all!

    By the way, the traffic rules in Brazil are completely twisted. Stop signs don't mean stop at all, they just mean the same as the white triangle, even though there are white triangle signs in Brazil as well.

    Captcha: valetudo (portuguese for "everything goes" or "all allowed")

  • Kevin (unregistered) in reply to Brazilian Guy

    I have had the joy of driving in Juárez, Mexico where stop signs and red lights are so optional. Hell there, everything in driving is optional.

    Granted, where I live in NEW MEXICO, USA it seems that stop signs and red lights are optional too.

  • ysth (unregistered)

    Amusing snippet from perl's Configure:

    cat >c1$$ <<EOF ARGGGHHHH!!!!! <p>SCO csh still thinks true is false. Write to SCO today and tell them that next year Configure ought to "rm /bin/csh" unless they fix their blasted shell. :-)

    (Actually, Configure ought to just patch csh in place. Hmm. Hmmmmm. All we'd have to do is go in and swap the && and || tokens, wherever they are.)

    [End of diatribe. We now return you to your regularly scheduled programming...] EOF cat >c2$$ <<EOF

    OOPS! You naughty creature! You didn't run Configure with sh! I will attempt to remedy the situation by running sh for you... EOF

    true || cat c1$$ c2$$ true || exec sh $0 $argv:q

    (exit $?0) || cat c2$$ (exit $?0) || exec sh $0 $argv:q rm -f c1$$ c2$$

  • (cs)
  • Andy (unregistered) in reply to Johnny Awkward

    That's the version of 'coreutils' you're seeing, not 'true'...

  • (cs) in reply to adhominem
    adhominem:
    Johnny Awkward:
    On my installation of Linux, '/bin/true --version' is reporting version 5.2.1. And it's 12K of code.

    On mine, it's version 6.9, and 19k. Feature creep, probably.

    It's at 6.9 because it's part of the coreutils package, and coreutils is at version 6.9. It's 19k because that's about the smallest executable that gcc is willing to produce.

  • TRWTF Troll (unregistered) in reply to vt_mruhlin

    Reminds me of the "Don't Gridlock" signs in Pittsburgh.

    There are the words "Don't Gridlock" inside one of those no smoking / ghostbusters (/) signs.

    Are they saying no to don't gridlock?

  • (cs)

    The "traffic light" one looks like everyday traffic in most parts of China.

    You haven't lived until you've been in a coach in China with an experienced driver who spots a traffic build-up ahead and therefore decides that the best way to proceed is the wrong way on a highway, then negociates a roundabout (again, going the wrong way) successfully.

  • David (unregistered) in reply to alegr
    alegr:
    BlueKnot:
    MET:
    I blame the drivers. The junctions are clearly boxed (the yellow diamonds) so they should not have pulled out until there was somewhere to get out. Only a moron blindly pulls forward without thinking just because the lights told them to.
    Which describes the majority of drivers today.

    Which actually describes the majority of drivers at any given epoch.

    Epoch Fail!

  • mmm (unregistered) in reply to Carnildo
    On mine, it's version 6.9, and 19k. Feature creep, probably.
    It's at 6.9 because it's part of the coreutils package, and coreutils is at version 6.9. It's 19k because that's about the smallest executable that gcc is willing to produce.
    Uh, no.
       text    data     bss     dec     hex filename
      18406     384     388   19178    4aea true
       1486     284       8    1778     6f2 uptime
    
    this is coreutils true 6.10 btw
  • clev (unregistered) in reply to SomeCoder
    SomeCoder:
    In America, you aren't allowed to enter an intersection unless you can clear it, period. The left turn yield on green means that you can enter it and wait for traffic or until the light turns yellow to clear but you still must be able to clear it.

    99% of Americans (and especially in the state where I live) don't understand that you aren't supposed to enter an intersection that you can't clear. It's really irritating.

    I don't know which America you're living in, but in California, you can enter and block any intersection on a green unless there's an explicit "Do not block intersection" sign at that intersection.

  • (cs) in reply to Brazilian Guy
    Brazilian Guy:
    By the way, the traffic rules in Brazil are completely twisted. Stop signs don't mean stop at all, they just mean the same as the white triangle, even though there are white triangle signs in Brazil as well.

    And what does a "white triangle" mean? Is it the same thing as an American "yield" sign?

  • mmm (unregistered) in reply to Lunkwill
    [email protected] ~ $ time for (( i=0; i<10000; ++i )); do ./true.sh; done

    real 0m35.886s user 0m4.432s sys 0m12.373s [email protected] ~ $ time for (( i=0; i<10000; ++i )); do /bin/true; done

    real 0m25.883s user 0m1.648s sys 0m8.637s

    There you go, NetBSD. Considering what a monster /bin/sh is in comparison to some "int main{return 0;}" plus libc gruft, it's pretty obvious why that is.

    Is your /bin/sh by any chance bash? This is on NetBSD, /usr/bin/true is the script.

    $ n=0; time while [ $n -lt 10000 ]; do n=$((n + 1)); ./true; done
       11.39s real     0.43s user     1.11s system
    $ n=0; time while [ $n -lt 10000 ]; do n=$((n + 1)); /usr/bin/true; done
       17.67s real     0.39s user     1.20s system
    

    The user and system time are almost equal... Besides, most shells have a builtin true, so it's moot anyway.

    But I agree, there's nothing wrong with a binary true. But then again, there is with a 20k one...

  • (cs) in reply to Gonzalo
    Gonzalo:
    What's the deal with black cars in Sao Paulo? Half of them are black!

    Must have been listening to the ole Henry Ford motto:

    You can have any color car you want, as long as its black.

  • SomeCoder (unregistered) in reply to clev
    clev:
    SomeCoder:
    In America, you aren't allowed to enter an intersection unless you can clear it, period. The left turn yield on green means that you can enter it and wait for traffic or until the light turns yellow to clear but you still must be able to clear it.

    99% of Americans (and especially in the state where I live) don't understand that you aren't supposed to enter an intersection that you can't clear. It's really irritating.

    I don't know which America you're living in, but in California, you can enter and block any intersection on a green unless there's an explicit "Do not block intersection" sign at that intersection.

    I'd like to see the California law that specifically allows someone to cause traffic to back up. If said law does exist, it's no wonder California roads are gridlocked 100% of the time down there.

  • SomeCoder (unregistered)

    Actually, nevermind, I found where it is ILLEGAL in California to block the intersection:

    "(a) Notwithstanding any official traffic control signal indication to proceed, a driver of a vehicle shall not enter an intersection or marked crosswalk unless there is sufficient space on the other side of the intersection or marked crosswalk to accommodate the vehicle driven without obstructing the through passage of vehicles from either side."

    From: http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/vctop/d11/vc22526.htm

    So yes, I live in America where blocking the intersection is illegal. Doesn't mean that people don't do it though.

  • Vempele (unregistered) in reply to Gonzalo
    Gonzalo:
    What's the deal with black cars in Sao Paulo? Half of them are black!

    The rest of the black cars aren't black?

  • FRIEND COMPUTER (unregistered)

    #!/bin/bash

    WTF Brillant Comment v 2.3b

    COPYRIGHT 2008, FRIEND COMPUTER

    THIS IS AN UNPUBLISHED, COPYRIGHTED, PRIVATE COMMENT.

    IF YOU ARE READING THIS BY MISTAKE, PLEASE REPORT FOR

    TERMINATION.

    This disclaimer does not evidence any

    actual or intended publication of this comment.

    wtf -v -i wit -o comment

  • Pete (unregistered)

    Why disable comments for the comic? Unless it is/was an elaborate prank (it's hard to think of anyone putting in that kind of effort), not all comments were negative.

  • Ubersoldat (unregistered)

    $man true

    REPORTING BUGS Report bugs to [email protected].

    jejeje... I know is part of coreutils and this must be some standard part of man pages, but still is funny

  • duh (unregistered) in reply to Christophe
    Christophe:
    hallo.amt:
    You know, there is also a program called false

    That can't be true!!!

    It's not!

  • dkf (unregistered) in reply to clevershark
    clevershark:
    You haven't lived until you've been in a coach in China with an experienced driver who spots a traffic build-up ahead and therefore decides that the best way to proceed is the wrong way *on a highway*, then negociates a roundabout (again, going the wrong way) successfully.
    I haven't lived, or I haven't had a near death experience until I've travelled with such an epic madman?
  • (cs) in reply to v.dog
    v.dog:
    Version 0.1
    bash-2.05$ cat /bin/true bash-2.05$
    I'm sure you can guess the rest.
    I'm fairly sure that there is at least one version of *nix, and at least one shell therein, where running this "script" doesn't change the value of our beloved $?. Which ain't much use if you're going to test for "truth" later.

    And besides, what is "truth"? From the look of it, AT&T had no idea prior to 1984. Or at least, their lawyers hadn't agreed on a definition that would stand up in court.

    PS I did not have sexual relations with that exit status.

    Addendum (2008-02-22 19:31): PPS Does SCO hold the copyright on this one?

  • (cs) in reply to ais523
    ais523:
    In the UK, they mean that you can't enter the intersection unless your exit is clear; however, you can enter the box if your exit is clear but a stream of traffic is preventing you actually getting to it.
    You know, I just knew I shouldn't have skipped that Sex-Ed class...
  • (cs) in reply to Fabian
    Fabian:
    BTW: the santas are indeed cool, but I also like the bus blocking all lanes towards the bottom right.
    My favorites are the motorcycle (?) couriers...
  • Phleabo (unregistered) in reply to real_aardvark
    real_aardvark:
    Version 0.1

    Addendum (2008-02-22 19:31): PPS Does SCO hold the copyright on this one?

    No, actually. A court has ruled that Novell owns that copyright.

  • Grobbendonk (unregistered)

    I am not sure which is worse, that this is copyrighted, or that this is version 1.6.

    I'm happy that it copyrighted - it means that no-one else can use it...

  • CSM (unregistered) in reply to clev
    clev:
    SomeCoder:
    In America, you aren't allowed to enter an intersection unless you can clear it, period. The left turn yield on green means that you can enter it and wait for traffic or until the light turns yellow to clear but you still must be able to clear it.

    99% of Americans (and especially in the state where I live) don't understand that you aren't supposed to enter an intersection that you can't clear. It's really irritating.

    I don't know which America you're living in, but in California, you can enter and block any intersection on a green unless there's an explicit "Do not block intersection" sign at that intersection.

    Usually the intersections that say "Do not block" aren't 4-way, light-controlled intersections--they are usually intersections where one direction of traffic has the full right-of-way and would otherwise never need to stop. In 4-way, light controlled intersections I'm pretty sure it's unlawful to be a traffic-blocking idiot.

  • Josh (unregistered)

    There are definitely "do not block" signs at light-controlled CA intersections, in particularly busy areas. I see one driving to school every day. Of course, they oftentimes still are blocked... I think it serves more as a reminder than anything, in areas where it's particularly sorely needed.

  • Jared (unregistered)

    You're on Digg

    http://digg.com/odd_stuff/Comcast_sends_screenshots_instead_of_a_new_printout_of_bill

  • Jb (unregistered)

    My uncle who is a county traffic engineer for a major US city comments that this reminds him of the typical requests he gets from citizens. I've heard this one before:

    caller: You need to change intersection X. Traffic's getting backed up at rush hour! engineer: ...uh, ok. what's wrong with it? caller: it needs more green time so more people can get through! engineer: for which road? caller: both. engineer: (stunned silence)

    Now we have an illustration for why this scheme isn't such a great idea for those who can't see the contradiction on their own.

    These stories have taught me that, sadly, Programmers' users are no worse than those of any other engineering profession. And, luckily, we don't have to worry about being constantly overruled by a single call to the local polititian for all but the most catastrophically bad decisions.

    • I doubt those kids trying to get airborn actually think the limit on this residential road is 70mph; what will more speed limit signs do? give them something to aim for on their way down?
  • Aidan (unregistered) in reply to Christophe
    Christophe:
    hallo.amt:
    You know, there is also a program called false

    That can't be true!!!

    There's also the non-existant filenotfound...

  • Atario (unregistered)

    No one seems to have noticed that each direction is being blocked by traffic coming from the right. Generally, you watch for a clear intersection by watching the traffic in front of you, going the same way as you.

    Looks to me like the light gave everyone red for a bit, then gave everyone green at once. Everyone advances, then slams on the brakes when those silly people to the right "run the light". Instant swastika-form gridlock.

  • Ralph (unregistered)

    The real WTF is that they disabled comments on comics.

    Problem: People are complaining that comics are boring.

    Solution: Remove the ability for users to complain.

    Problem solved.

  • (cs) in reply to notme
    notme:
    You should have a look at true.c from the GNU coreutils some time. You'll be amazed...

    At my system, GNU true is a link to the truefalse program. One can call it "truefalse (-true|-false)", and it will return the apropriate vale. But first, it tests argv[0] to discover if it was called "true" or "false". Alied with macros for discovering the apropriate return value, that is a fabulous piece of overengeenering.

  • (cs) in reply to Brazilian Guy
    Brazilian Guy:
    By the way, the traffic rules in Brazil are completely twisted. Stop signs don't mean stop at all, they just mean the same as the white triangle, even though there are white triangle signs in Brazil as well.

    Oh, no. Our rules are quite good. They just aren't followed by the morons most places hire as "trafic engineers" that place stop signs where there should be triangles. It is also common to have 40km/h curves on 60km/h streets (and even on some 80km/h ones), dead-lock prone intersections, streets that cut the path of rainwater without any channels to deal with them...

    But those problems aren't very common at the city of São Paulo.

  • (cs) in reply to Carnildo
    Carnildo:
    Brazilian Guy:
    By the way, the traffic rules in Brazil are completely twisted. Stop signs don't mean stop at all, they just mean the same as the white triangle, even though there are white triangle signs in Brazil as well.

    And what does a "white triangle" mean? Is it the same thing as an American "yield" sign?

    It means you should stop if there is somebody at the other street. If there isnt, you don't need to stop.

  • (cs) in reply to mare

    In the UK we have yellow hatched markings in our box junctions. They mean exactly the same thing though; you can't enter the junction unless your exit is clear.

    [image]
  • mobus (unregistered) in reply to Brazilian Guy
    Brazilian Guy:
    By the way, the traffic rules in Brazil are completely twisted. Stop signs don't mean stop at all, they just mean the same as the white triangle, even though there are white triangle signs in Brazil as well.

    You're wrong, please read the traffic code: the Brazilian STOP sign indeed means "stop the vehicle and yield"; in theory, if you do not stop, you get the same fine as advancing a semaphore while it is red. Problem is, as with everything in Brazil, the lack of enforcement. Don't blame the rules: Brazilians drive the way they drive because they can do anything and get away with it. It's more of a cultural and engineering problem (poorly-placed signs and intersections).

    I got rear-ended by a taxi driver last year for this very reason: I did not enter a locked intersection. I get honked at every single day for yielding to pedestrians at pedestrian crossings or for daring to use it as a pedestrian.

    Nothing short of impounding/sequestering the offending vehicles, and arresting the drivers will change it.

  • PSpeed (unregistered) in reply to Josh
    Josh:
    There are definitely "do not block" signs at light-controlled CA intersections, in particularly busy areas. I see one driving to school every day. Of course, they oftentimes still *are* blocked... I think it serves more as a reminder than anything, in areas where it's particularly sorely needed.

    Tend to agree with your reasoning.

    Of course the unintended side-effect, as has been apparent by a few posts here and personal experience, is that it is then assumed that when a sign doesn't exist that the rule is no longer in effect.

    The fact that "do not block intersection" and "slow traffic keep right" signs are needed at all is a fundamental problem. And putting up a few reminder signs here and there only makes it worse.

    I think I even remember seeing a "Stop on Red" sign. Ugh.

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